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OTish - Wood Mitre Saw

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  • OTish - Wood Mitre Saw

    I'm about to install my Bauerle pendulum crosscut / mitre saw in it's own bench. Most of the job seems straightforward. One thing that I don't know is, when the blade cuts through the wood, how far should the teeth protrude through / beneath the work? A couple of mm? More?

    Like most of the heavier crosscut saws, this one cuts when you pull the blade towards you, so basically it's "climb milling". Sounds like it would grab the wood and try to take a sudden huge cut, but that doesn't seem to happen. Not sure if the amount of penetration through the work influences this, and if so, what the right setting is.

    Thanks,

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

  • #2
    Do you have any pictures of this beast?

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    • #3
      I'm jealous- that's a nice saw.
      I'd recommend just breaking through the work and seeing if the edge chips and then increasing the depth of cut until you get a clean kerf.

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      • #4
        I would think, regarding getting a clean kerf, the blade depth would be just the reverse of a table saw.
        I find that about an 1/8' of blade above the wood gives the cleanest cut so I would start with 1/8" of the blade below the wood.

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        • #5
          Depends, thin stuff want the sacrificial table high, thick stuff not so much, if you cut thin with little blade out I found small off cuts turned into projectiles, so we stuck a sheet of ply on the bed to raise the work.
          Mark

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          • #6
            It sounds like this is much like a radial arm saw: the blade and it's motor hang on an arm above the work and is pulled towards you to cut. It can be adjusted to different heights.

            The one radial arm saw that I used had a particle board table under the saw blade and the cut had to go into that table a bit for the cut to be full depth. But if you lowered it too far, you could cut that table in half or at least a good percentage of it's depth, greatly weakening it. I had some idiot do that and I had to replace the table. I never found out who did that. SO, you only lower the blade about 1 or 2 mm (1/16") into the table. That's all it takes.

            As for the saw jumping out at you, YES that is a distinct problem. The saw I used had a mechanism to limit the speed at which it could move along the rail and they advised that it be kept properly adjusted and engaged at all times. I found that this was also a good way to get a nice, clean cut. You did not want to cut too fast anyway.

            A bigger problem was when the saw head was rotated 90 degrees for ripping. When ripping on a saw like this, you should always feed the lumber against the direction of rotation. If you feed it into the rotation, it can grab, take off, and impale anyone or anything in it's path. Very bad. Always feed against the rotation.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Clean cut? Use a sharp blade. A dead sharp blade.
              Paul A.

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                It sounds like this is much like a radial arm saw
                It's not. The power head swings on an overhead pivot (hence the term pendulum saw). Google it- there's lots of pictures. They're beasts.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
                  It's not. The power head swings on an overhead pivot (hence the term pendulum saw). Google it- there's lots of pictures. They're beasts.
                  Hummmmm. I looked at images after googling it. Not sure exactly how the thing works, but if It does indeed swing like a pendulum, then depth of cut will not be consistent, like it is with a radial arm saw.

                  So I wonder how one would answer the OP's question, since in that case the depth of cut is a variable.

                  And if somehow the depth of cut is constant, then it looks like this beast will essentially perform the same as a radial arm saw (doesn't look like it from the pictures though...)

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Ian B;1025755] Like most of the heavier crosscut saws, this one cuts when you pull the blade towards you, so basically it's "climb milling". Sounds like it would grab the wood and try to take a sudden huge cut.

                    The way the saw behaves has a lot to do with the blade, it is important to use only the correct blades on radial arm saws, I would think the same applies to this, the wrong blade may cause it to behave badly and bite the operator.

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                    • #11
                      Haven't seen pictures of it yet, but in general you want a nicely sharp blade for any kind of chop saw, radial saw, etc. Dull blades cause the real problems.

                      Ok, just looked at a few pics- looks like a nice rugged saw. I have to assume that the action lets the blade cross the table at a constant height- but regardless, you really only need to make sure it cuts through the material by 1/8 or so at what might be the worst points, which is the bottom edge up against the fence and the bottom edge at the front of the material.
                      Last edited by darryl; 01-16-2016, 05:24 PM.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        It still sounds like you want to make a minimal cut down into the table. Otherwise you will weaken it or cut it in half. Same idea, just cutting an arc vertically instead of a straight line.

                        But it would be safer with a deeper cut. Perhaps you should cut as deep as the table will allow.

                        This sounds like an older design. I doubt that such a saw could be sold today without some safety features. Do be careful.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          DZER

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                          • #14
                            For a general rule of thumb, I adjust my saws so they cut between 1/4th and 1/3rd of the tooth into the table. Works best for me.

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                            • #15
                              OK, big honking saw.

                              And from the looks of the linkage, it does "swing out" along a straight line, not an arc. So the penetration into the table should be constant along the cut. What is not obvious in those pictures is if the depth of the cut can even be adjusted.

                              With a blade that big, and a 3/4" or 1" thick "table" it probably does not make a lot of difference how deep into that table you go. It will still be about the same angle at the cut. Unless you can go an inch or two or three below the bottom of that wood table.



                              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                              Paul A.

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                              Comment

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