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OT: Solid metallic hydrogen

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  • OT: Solid metallic hydrogen

    "Molecular hydrogen is normally a gas at room temperature, but when crushed with diamond anvils, it can convert into a totally different, previously unknown state of matter, according to a team of condensed-matter physicists.

    The so-called "phase V," described in the journal Nature, poses a significant step toward finding what’s been called the holy grail of high-pressure physics: solid metallic hydrogen."

    http://www.latimes.com/science/scien...107-story.html

    Here's the Nature article referenced:

    http://www.nature.com/articles/natur...ww.latimes.com

  • #2
    I wonder how they remove the possibility of a fission reaction.

    Comment


    • #3
      Cool - Whats the machinability rating?

      Comment


      • #4
        If you mix it with oxygen,
        you can carve it with a chainsaw.

        -D
        DZER

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        • #5
          A space alien introduced this as an unlimited power source in 1957. Science Fiction Theater, "The Magic Suitcase":

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_Fiction_Theatre

          A stranger arrives in a remote dwelling with a small suitcase. It has an electrical outlet on the outside and, in the stranger's absence, the homeowner's son plugs his electric train into it. He is scolded by his father but, after the stranger disappears without the suitcase, the man refers it to scientists because the energy the suitcase puts out seems unlimited. Unable to pierce the material of the suitcase, the scientists use the suitcase's own energy to break it open. They do not fully understand what they find inside (a block of solidified hydrogen) and the suitcase no longer produces energy. A "killing the goose that laid the golden egg" tale.
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tlfamm View Post
            ... it can convert into a totally different, previously unknown state of matter, according to a team of condensed-matter physicists.
            This is a very interesting development. I never knew that the core of Jupiter might be metallic hydrogen, with properties of which we have no knowledge.

            This claim has me puzzled:
            ... Solid metallic hydrogen might exhibit such far-out properties as superfluidity and superconductivity – and so, if it were ever able to be mass produced, it could have game-changing technological implications, he added.

            I am familiar with the superfluidity of helium below 2 kelvins -- it has zero viscosity, and will creep up the side of a flask and "siphon" itself to the other side. That's pretty weird, but perhaps not as weird as solid hydrogen demonstrating like behavior.
            Allan Ostling

            Phoenix, Arizona

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            • #7
              Well, I have to say this before anything- whenever something comes along that is of potential use and seen for it's market value, the 'invention' or whatever you call it is going to be exploited by those who do that, and we the public will be paying to have use of it in our lives. This cycle has been going on for a long time, and basically don't expect anything to change with this. We simply aren't getting the wonderful results from any 'breakthrough' or 'new discovery' that the hype always tries to sell. The trickle down to us the consumer has always been slow because 'certain people' are making money from us using the old technology. They want to keep that train going.

              But, after having that initial reaction, I must say I find it actually somewhat exciting to be reminded of these 'super things', like metallic hydrogen, or room temperature superconductors, a lot of things carbon related- graphene lately in that regard. Wouldn't it be cool if we as individuals could actually make good use to our own benefits from some of this technology.

              We do get a trickle down- (but hey, where's my flying car)- but where's my hobbyist-made basement superconductor module that I could dump my solar panel energy into, for instance. None of this technology is new of course, and I'm constantly amazed at how old the roots of technology are.

              I'm frustrated that it's not happening sooner. We have at our disposal some wondrous things- super magnets, metallic hydrogen, we seem to be on the verge of having a room temperature superconductor, we have graphene, which by all accounts has several prized characteristics. We have 'super super magnets' on the horizon, iron-nitrogen. The list is longer-

              I just wanna have my own little warp engine or something-
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #8
                So I'm guessing that the invention of transparent aluminum is just a few years in the future!!!

                JL.........

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                • #9
                  Where can I get a chunk of aircraft billet hydrogen?
                  Mike
                  WI/IL border, USA

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                  • #10
                    transparent aluminum - it's been around a good while. Whatever happened to Starlight- the ceramic. Anybody remember that?
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by darryl View Post
                      Well, I have to say this before anything- whenever something comes along that is of potential use and seen for it's market value, the 'invention' or whatever you call it is going to be exploited by those who do that, and we the public will be paying to have use of it in our lives.
                      -Yep! Stuff like desktop computers that cost less than a refrigerator, flat-screen TVs, iPhones, the internet, something like five or six streaming movie and TV services, microwave ovens, cars that get 40+ MPG and last for 200K miles, transatlantic flights, year-round fresh vegetables in the stores, a distinct lack of polio...

                      Damn those people for developing something and "exploiting" it by bringing it to market where we can buy it and use it to improve our lives! Those bastards!

                      We simply aren't getting the wonderful results from any 'breakthrough' or 'new discovery' that the hype always tries to sell.
                      -He says as he sits in front of an incredibly powerful supercomputer, that is linked directly to nearly all available modern knowledge, and through which he can converse at leisure with thousands of people scattered literally all across the globe.

                      You and I seem to have rather different interpretations of "wonderful results".

                      Doc.
                      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                        So I'm guessing that the invention of transparent aluminum is just a few years in the future!
                        -We've had transparent aluminum for literally billions of years. Most people called them "rubies" and "sapphires".

                        Doc.
                        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I want some! The first billet hydrogen top yoke can be mine!

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                          • #14
                            The article says solid hydrogen was first predicted in 1935 - NOT true. Metallic hydrogen was proposed by John Keely sometime in the 1880s (estimate). http://www.svpwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page=Hydrogen

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                            • #15
                              Here's some more detail: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-35237985

                              They applied "about a ton of force" on the back end of the diamond anvil, and almost got metallic hydrogen. Hey, we're almost there - if someone on this board would offer the (free) use of their HF 20 ton hydraulic press, it looks like the problem would be solved!

                              Ian
                              All of the gear, no idea...

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