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Bolt Down LMS 3990 Mill?

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  • Seastar
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
    After having used these extensively in test positions it is not going to tip over. That is period, gospel, full stop.

    What it might do under extreme circumstances depending on the surface of the bench, like smooth plastic, is, it may walk off with vibration from cutting.
    So if you don't want holes in your shiny bench at the moment either do like Flylo says and use a steel plate, if you have one or just run a bead round with a hot melt glue gun.
    The glue will act as a dam to stop it moving and also some will get underneath to hold the machine but it can all be warmed up and peeled off if needed.
    Now you have the definitive answer!
    Bill

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    After having used these extensively in test positions it is not going to tip over. That is period, gospel, full stop.

    What it might do under extreme circumstances depending on the surface of the bench, like smooth plastic, is, it may walk off with vibration from cutting.
    So if you don't want holes in your shiny bench at the moment either do like Flylo says and use a steel plate, if you have one or just run a bead round with a hot melt glue gun.
    The glue will act as a dam to stop it moving and also some will get underneath to hold the machine but it can all be warmed up and peeled off if needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seastar
    replied
    Originally posted by flylo View Post
    Why not bolt it to a bigger steel plate if your set not to bolt it to the bench. That would give it a bigger footprint & more weight on the very bottom? Then if you choose to you could C clanp it to the bench if it walks around taking heavy cuts.
    +1. That's an excellent idea Flylo.
    Bill

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  • Mike Amick
    replied
    Originally posted by Beazld View Post
    And socialism too
    Don't forget fascism ..

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  • flylo
    replied
    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    It does appear that this mill has a more narrow base than my drill-mill, and it is also considerably lighter. So I would agree that bolting it down would be a good idea. Mine already has a chip pan, and that is another good idea.

    Why not bolt it to a bigger steel plate if your set not to bolt it to the bench. That would give it a bigger footprint & more weight on the very bottom? Then if you choose to you could C clanp it to the bench if it walks around taking heavy cuts.
    Last edited by flylo; 02-14-2016, 11:57 PM.

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  • flylo
    replied
    Originally posted by KIMFAB View Post
    Still bitter eh?
    I love it.
    Not me, never was. I wasn't the one whining, I was having a blast as I always do

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Sometimes the need to bolt it down depends on where you are. 5 miles from an earthquake fault, it's pretty good advise to bolt things down when tools are heavy and prone to tipping when the bench moves an inch or two in a fraction of a second.

    Other times, it makes for better operation when the tool has the rigidity of the bench added to the strength of the castings.

    I bolted my micro mill down. It's less than 100 lbs and easy to move if I loosen the bolts. It would also nose-dive off the edge of the bench in a good quake. BTW, if you are in an area with fracking, there are likely to be many small quakes.


    Dan ( near San Francisco)

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  • kf2qd
    replied
    Mine has 2 long bolts through the back 2 holes. Not tightened down just to keep the machine from shifting in place.

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  • dp
    replied
    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    It does appear that this mill has a more narrow base than my drill-mill, and it is also considerably lighter. So I would agree that bolting it down would be a good idea. Mine already has a chip pan, and that is another good idea.
    The larger problem is while that mill is top heavy, it is also very light weight, and any time you put a wrench on it to clamp your work or to pull the tool holder from the quill the whole dang thing shifts. I put up with it on my mill for about 3 weeks before I purchased the bolts and drip pan. I have the tilting Grizzly version of that (this one doesn't tilt) and it is surprisingly unsteady even when not tilted (tilting is largely a waste of time, btw).

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  • boslab
    replied
    If you don't intend to use it with a spinning eccentric load then I suppose it's not going to go far, if however you have the urge to at some point fly cut I'm fairly certain you would have a mobile machine, it will move, I'm guessing that's why it's supposed to be fixed down, I know how quickly things wander about after foolishly turning on a bench grinder that got loose, the bolts holding it had been unscrewed to remove it (without my permission!) it was fine until I swiched it off and the wheels were slowing, it hit some resonant frequency, went bonkers and ended on the floor, smashed btw.
    It's wise to fix spinning things down was the moral of the story, expiriences has shown this to be true, no amount of reasoning will change the fact.
    Shove some bolts through the holes they thoughtfully supplied
    Mark

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  • Beazld
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    I've never bolted anything down either. I agree with the advice part, use logic and sound reasoning. Passing down old lies from generation to generation is why religeon still exists.
    And socialism too

    Leave a comment:


  • PStechPaul
    replied
    It does appear that this mill has a more narrow base than my drill-mill, and it is also considerably lighter. So I would agree that bolting it down would be a good idea. Mine already has a chip pan, and that is another good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • KIMFAB
    replied
    Still bitter eh?
    I love it.

    Leave a comment:


  • flylo
    replied
    Not trying to be rude but Sasquatch is right it's 2 bolts either follow directions & bolt it or don't, when it falls it's your broken machine & foot not mine & the arguement about permanent position on the bench is easily solved but using wing nuts if you don't own 2 wrenches. And no this isn't a veiled attempt for me to sell 2 bolts or a wrench LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • moerman
    replied
    Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
    10 minutes and two bolts. Tough decision?
    Maybe it is the permanent position on the bench what makes it a tough decision. My bandsaw isn't bolted down althoug it should be. I always can unbolt it and move it but I like the thought of having a flexible setup.

    Leave a comment:

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