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  • Making wood chisels from scratch?

    I'm thinking of making a set of wood chisels for my future brother in law who is a contractor. I figured it would be something unique rather than the typical wedding gift.

    They probably will be mainly ornamental, but I still want to make them fully functional. I'm thinking O1 tool steel, a moderate heat treat, maybe 48 to 52 RC. CNC engrave his name on them, hickory handle, and a P20 tool steel strike plate.

    So has anyone ever built a set?

  • #2
    Socketed chisels are nice, like the reintroduced Stanley sweetheart range, you can replace the handle easily enough
    Mark
    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=st...sC25O-JGQ8M%3A

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jimmer12 View Post
      I'm thinking of making a set of wood chisels for my future brother in law who is a contractor. I figured it would be something unique rather than the typical wedding gift.

      They probably will be mainly ornamental, but I still want to make them fully functional. I'm thinking O1 tool steel, a moderate heat treat, maybe 48 to 52 RC. CNC engrave his name on them, hickory handle, and a P20 tool steel strike plate.

      So has anyone ever built a set?
      How about something more unique?

      Like, corner chisels. Or radius corner chisels, the radius used for <Some common contractor task>. Something he can use in his tool kit.
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        Most contemporary Western chisels aim for an RC of 60-62 or so. Japanese chisels tend to be 62-64. The members of a woodworking club here in MN made a bunch of chisels out of O1 hardened to 60 and the guys love them. They left the sides square like old firmers, they didn't bevel the lands.

        BTW, these chisels are simple tangs, bolstered by a washer or whatever and driven into custom handles.
        Last edited by oldwing; 02-21-2016, 10:32 AM. Reason: More stuff

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        • #5
          Originally posted by oldwing View Post
          Most contemporary Western chisels aim for an RC of 60-62 or so. Japanese chisels tend to be 62-64. The members of a woodworking club here in MN made a bunch of chisels out of O1 hardened to 60 and the guys love them. They left the sides square like old firmers, they didn't bevel the lands.

          BTW, these chisels are simple tangs, bolstered by a washer or whatever and driven into custom handles.
          Ok, most reading I've done suggested the harder steels had a tendency to chip the edge easier. But heat treating to 60 RC is easy enough.

          Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
            How about something more unique?

            Like, corner chisels. Or radius corner chisels, the radius used for <Some common contractor task>. Something he can use in his tool kit.
            I'll do some poking around and see what he commonly uses.

            Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jimmer12 View Post
              I'm thinking of making a set of wood chisels for my future brother in law who is a contractor. I figured it would be something unique rather than the typical wedding gift.
              ...and for the wife?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
                ...and for the wife?
                I'll make her a matching set of chisels.

                Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

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                • #9
                  Measure once, chisel twice and it's still too small!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jimmer12 View Post
                    I'll make her a matching set of chisels.

                    Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk
                    Make her a rolling pin that separates into a pair of mallets.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kendall View Post
                      Make her a rolling pin that separates into a pair of mallets.
                      Excellent suggestion. Then I will demand fresh made lasagna when I visit...actually rolling pins that become mallets may not be good for my health.

                      Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        You are aware that most wedding gifts are for the couple, for the household. Even I know that. If you want to make something, how about SS salt and pepper shakers. Or a set of pots and pans made from "billet". Err, Military Grade billet, that is.

                        Do the chisels later for his birthday or some other occasion.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                          You are aware that most wedding gifts are for the couple, for the household. Even I know that. If you want to make something, how about SS salt and pepper shakers. Or a set of pots and pans made from "billet". Err, Military Grade billet, that is.

                          Do the chisels later for his birthday or some other occasion.
                          Meh, my wife can be in charge of figuring out what the hell her sister wants.

                          Or I'll give these to him at his bachelor party instead.

                          Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

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                          • #14
                            Don't forget to hollow grind them.
                            It makes sharpening them on a
                            stone fast and easy.

                            -Doozer
                            DZER

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                            • #15
                              Some time back, I watched Peter Ross forge a socketed chisel. After he finished the socket, he forge welded a piece of steel in place to form the cutting edge. After some file work, stoning, and fitting a handle, he had a nice colonial period wood workers chisel. Peter's forge is near Siler City, NC. He is an authority on colonial period iron work.

                              Jim

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