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Are small lathes dangerous? Do I need training before operating one?

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  • I have learned to read first by breaking some parts early in my life. If a machine or tool is strange to me, like you mentioned JT, I as well will read up on the item before using it most times simply so I don't break it.
    Andy

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    • 1)Don't do a parting cut between centers or having the tailstock engaged in the piece
      2)Don't leave chuck key in chuck
      3)Make sure no hair, jewelry, or loose clothing can come in contact with workpiece, chuck,or anything else that is turning

      For the most part, those three items will keep you safe if followed.
      And one more thing, don't place your hands anywhere that you wouldn't touch with your dick

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      • I guess I learned when very young!

        Dad was a keen model steam engine enthusiast. He took "The Model Engineer" magazine, back then it arrived every Thursday. I was looking at the pictures and asking him to take me to see, or make models for me before I could read.The idea that " You need a lathe to make models"was firmly planted in my mind before I was 8 or so. Friends helped us out with the lathe work we needed to keep purchased models running at first but is soon became apparent that we needed one of our own. I have previously told of how we were given a home made lathe and got it up and running when I was 13 or so. I do not remember any specific concerns about safety being raised, just a general awareness of the need for care and thought in using the lathe, and those better ones which followed. My children learned about tools and workshops in their early years, and still have interest and involvement and all their fingers! I hope this is of interest . Regards David Powell.

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        • Originally posted by RB211 View Post
          1)Don't do a parting cut between centers or having the tailstock engaged in the piece
          2)Don't leave chuck key in chuck
          3)Make sure no hair, jewelry, or loose clothing can come in contact with workpiece, chuck,or anything else that is turning

          For the most part, those three items will keep you safe if followed.
          And one more thing, don't place your hands anywhere that you wouldn't touch with your dick
          I think that the only lathe safety rules that are not intuitive are:

          a) the problem with long stock through the spindle starting to whip.

          b) Chucks that can come loose.

          Dan
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

          Location: SF East Bay.

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