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  • Surface grinder prices

    I have a chance to buy a Delta Milwaukee surface grinder with some centers and a longer table. I can think of some uses for it. Whats a good price for the shape its in?





    Last edited by daveo; 03-22-2016, 09:07 PM.
    Feel free to put me on ignore....

  • #2
    Hi,

    Had one years ago in good shape and payed less than $500.00 for it. This one looks beat as is. The long table and centers come from a tool and cutter grinder. If you can't test the grinder I would keep looking.
    Toolznthings

    Comment


    • #3
      A turd from the word go.
      I would not take one for free.
      It's got a column like a drill press.
      Grit most likely has already worn it out.

      -D
      DZER

      Comment


      • #4
        Nice and rusty to boot. Not taken care of by the previous owner and/or current seller. Looks like it's being stored outside on a trailer. Seller is probably little more than a junk dealer.

        Comment


        • #5
          "Whats a good price for the shape its in?"

          Whatever it's worth to you. It isn't much of a surface grinder. Like you, I could think of uses for it.
          But you'll have time and money in it before you see a spark, speaking of which, is it the original motor, and what's the spindle like, bronze or ball bearing?
          Wheels (rocks) may be hard to find, parts harder yet.
          Apart from all that, a solid little easy to work on machine. I'd say $125, in the north east.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am surprised there are yet no posts saying,
            "Why all the negative? If the manufacturer built a
            grinder, it must be good. Even though it has a round
            column, it is good enough for most things. Any HSM
            would be glad to have a grinder like that. It's not that
            dirty, anything can be cleaned. And I am not expecting
            NASA precision. So the wear from the grit getting in the
            column area should be fine. If grit was a problem, they
            would have designed it differently. If it was made in a
            factory, we need to trust the design. They are not going
            to market something that doesn't work well. People
            wouldn't buy it if it was not a good design. And besides,
            me and my broken over buddy can carry it into my tool
            shed. (not my garage, my wife need to park there.)
            I'll get 'er fixed up and a new latex paint job will make
            it look like a rebuild. I hear rollers are the way to go
            for something like this. I might even sand blast it first
            or pressure wash it to make sure I do a good job.
            Then I can post pictures on the internet to show that
            now I have joined the more prestigious club of HSMers
            with a grinder."
            Wait and see. They will come.

            -Doozer
            DZER

            Comment


            • #7
              Doozer, you didn't have that beer yet didja.

              Comment


              • #8
                It's a simpler relative of this

                http://www.mikestools.com/download/D...3-08-15-67.pdf

                Your pics do not show the head adjuster, which is an important part of the machine. the fine adjust is on the traveling part of the head.

                It's likely mostly a tool grinder, not so much a surface grinder although if you look at the manual for the somewhat fancier version in the link, they suggest it for many things. And it probably will do them, at least sort-of. A grinder does not have to do that many things to be useful, but it does need to hold the head steady, be easily adjustable, and move the table straight.

                They seem to be respected as the lowest end workable grinder over at PM, for what that is worth. Probably not a "turd from the word go", as Doozer seems to think (he looks so much at the positive side of things), but it's not a super machine either.

                As for THAT one, it has some rust, but it is not by any means a flaky "ball-o-rust". Most of the paint is on it, and where it has come off the surface is not flaked with loose rust so it has been set aside unused, but not "stored in the rain". Not as obviously bad as others have said.

                As mentioned, test it under power. if that is not possible, you can offer scrap iron price if you want a project (technically that is about one cent a pound, maybe 20 bucks). He'll probably be angry, but any rusty machine that doesn't run is basically scrap, and I would have no problem saying that to the guy if he insists it is in good shape.

                if it runs, and the spindle rotates smoothly and quietly, it might be OK, given an unknown amount of work. The later versions have two sets of opposed angular contact ball bearings. If the spindle shows anything doubtful at all, it is probably best to take a walk, since that can quickly get much more expensive than it is worth. (Doing a "Doozer" here, trailer bearings won't fit that thing).

                To find out, you might have to loosen the belt and hand-turn the spindle. If you hear much noise, it's time to leave. Should be quieter than a regular bench grinder.
                Last edited by J Tiers; 03-23-2016, 11:27 AM.
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
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                Comment


                • #9
                  I've got one, it's ok for what it is. If it works and you can get it cheap (I paid $50 for mine, just to save it from the scrap yard).

                  They are more of a PITA to operate than a standard surface grinder but they do grind, and the one I have has the same spindle size as my Harig, so it can share wheels
                  Mike Hunter

                  www.mikehunterrestorations.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have used those before. They will do the job and are a nice size for HSM use. My main objection is that the wheel and motor assy. is on a pivot. When you are grinding, the resistance of the material can push the wheel up so it sometimes takes several passes to spark out. This is all manual operation so going side to side can wear you slick in a short time on a wide flat piece. It is a good tool for cutter sharpening though, where you are only working a small area like the end of an end mill.
                    Kansas City area

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      I would say "older" rather than "simpler". Same niche in the Rockwell product line, just from a few decades earlier.

                      It is definitely a tool-and-cutter grinder that can be used as a surface grinder in a pinch, NOT a surface grinder. Threads over on PM seem to indicate that folks have trouble with chatter and poor surface finish when trying to use them as surface grinders.

                      HGR surplus in Cleveland had 3-4 of them a month or two ago. Most are sold now (probably in the $200 price range). The best of the lot had a magnetic chuck and spare wheel hub - that one sold first. The only one left has neither of those things and is still priced at $299 - too high IMO.
                      https://www.hgrinc.com/productDetail...ER/02160860005
                      HGR lowers prices about every month until the item either sells or reaches scrap value, so it can be interesting to bookmark something and see what happens as time passes.

                      John

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Forgot to mention - that upper swivel table doesn't go with the Rockwell grinder. You might be able to adapt it, but don't expect it to just fit.

                        If you want to do surface grinding you are going to want a magnetic chuck. Check mag chuck prices before you buy a grinder without one.

                        Don't know where you are, but unless it is a tool wasteland you can probably find a real 6x12 or so surface grinder at a reasonable price.
                        For example, HGR has Boyar Shultz and Reid surface grinders starting at $226 including a mag chuck.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          It's a simpler relative of this

                          http://www.mikestools.com/download/D...3-08-15-67.pdf

                          Your pics do not show the head adjuster, which is an important part of the machine. the fine adjust is on the traveling part of the head.

                          It's likely mostly a tool grinder, not so much a surface grinder although if you look at the manual for the somewhat fancier version in the link, they suggest it for many things. And it probably will do them, at least sort-of. A grinder does not have to do that many things to be useful, but it does need to hold the head steady, be easily adjustable, and move the table straight.

                          They seem to be respected as the lowest end workable grinder over at PM, for what that is worth. Probably not a "turd from the word go", as Doozer seems to think (he looks so much at the positive side of things), but it's not a super machine either.

                          As for THAT one, it has some rust, but it is not by any means a flaky "ball-o-rust". Most of the paint is on it, and where it has come off the surface is not flaked with loose rust so it has been set aside unused, but not "stored in the rain". Not as obviously bad as others have said.

                          As mentioned, test it under power. if that is not possible, you can offer scrap iron price if you want a project (technically that is about one cent a pound, maybe 20 bucks). He'll probably be angry, but any rusty machine that doesn't run is basically scrap, and I would have no problem saying that to the guy if he insists it is in good shape.

                          if it runs, and the spindle rotates smoothly and quietly, it might be OK, given an unknown amount of work. The later versions have two sets of opposed angular contact ball bearings. If the spindle shows anything doubtful at all, it is probably best to take a walk, since that can quickly get much more expensive than it is worth. (Doing a "Doozer" here, trailer bearings won't fit that thing).

                          To find out, you might have to loosen the belt and hand-turn the spindle. If you hear much noise, it's time to leave. Should be quieter than a regular bench grinder.
                          Good info.! And the head adjuster is missing from my conversation with the guy. Im gona look at it tomorrow and run it. Guy wants 375.00 for it. I think is a little high.

                          If the head adjuster is gone and I dont think I can make one, I'm not interested!
                          Feel free to put me on ignore....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The grinder in your pix has a spindle with tapered bearing running in a matching tapered bronze bushing, running in light machine oil. The back of the spindle has a ball bearing. Parts for the front tapered bearing are probably next to impossible to find, but the bearing can be lapped in if it's not trashed. Somewhere I may have that information either downloaded or bookmarked.

                            The motor and motor pulley were originally balanced as an assembly at the factory. If the motor has been replaced you can expect some vibration that may or may not have an unacceptable effect on the grinding.

                            The long table and two centers you show are definitely a part of the grinder. The table can swivel (as can the grinder head) to give more options when setting up to grind various tools.

                            Keep in mind that just because the grinder is a bit rusty and ugly doesn't necessarily mean that it's worn out. The place that wears the most is usually the ways. Remove the table and turn it upside down and inspect the ways for excessive wear.

                            Keep in mind too that the grinder as shown weighs about 600 pounds.

                            It looks like you have the fine downfeed screw and graduated dial, but you're missing the bakelite knob. If you do buy this, let me know...I parted one out some years ago, but I think I may still have that knob.

                            Download this manual from the Vintage Machinery website and learn all about it: http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs....aspx?id=12601

                            It will have an adapter on the spindle that holds the grinding wheel. Unless someone has done something really crazy, the adapter will take typical toolroom grinding wheels with 1-1/4" bore.
                            Last edited by john hobdeclipe; 03-23-2016, 07:11 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
                              The grinder in your pix has a spindle with tapered bearing running in a matching tapered bronze bushing, running in light machine oil. The back of the spindle has a ball bearing. Parts for the front tapered bearing are probably next to impossible to find, but the bearing can be lapped in if it's not trashed. Somewhere I may have that information either downloaded or bookmarked.

                              The motor and motor pulley were originally balanced as an assembly at the factory. If the motor has been replaced you can expect some vibration that may or may not have an unacceptable effect on the grinding.

                              The long table and two centers you show are definitely a part of the grinder. The table can swivel (as can the grinder head) to give more options when setting up to grind various tools.

                              Keep in mind that just because the grinder is a bit rusty and ugly doesn't necessarily mean that it's worn out. The place that wears the most is usually the ways. Remove the table and turn it upside down and inspect the ways for excessive wear.

                              Keep in mind too that the grinder as shown weighs about 600 pounds.

                              It looks like you have the fine downfeed screw and graduated dial, but you're missing the bakelite knob. If you do buy this, let me know...I parted one out some years ago, but I think I may still have that knob.

                              Download this manual from the Vintage Machinery website and learn all about it: http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs....aspx?id=12601

                              It will have an adapter on the spindle that holds the grinding wheel. Unless someone has done something really crazy, the adapter will take typical toolroom grinding wheels with 1-1/4" bore.

                              Good info! Thank you. Im going to look at tomorrow and tell him yes or no. I think he did say just the knob was missing.

                              I didnt see anything in the pics that scared me. He sent me a bunch of close ups too
                              Feel free to put me on ignore....

                              Comment

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