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Home Shop Hot Dipped Galvanizing

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  • Home Shop Hot Dipped Galvanizing

    Any one ever tried it before???

    I have six small rods that I need hot dipped. Every place I've called has any where from a $200 to $400 minimum and they are all out of state. Just not feasible.

    There isn't much to the process other than a sulfuric acid bath to remove mill scale and other contaminates.

    Not sure if there is any flux bath required and then the zinc bath at about 850 degrees or so.

    I could make a small tank or easier yet, get one of those long stainless food pans. Where do I get the zinc????

    JL.................

  • #2
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    Where do I get the zinc????
    Got a penny jar?


    (EDIT: Modern pennies are nothing more than a copper-clad zinc disk, and it's easy to separate the two... put a nick in the copper, apply heat, and the zinc runs out)
    Last edited by adatesman; 04-05-2016, 01:56 PM.

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    • #3
      Go to a marina they sell pure zinc that is used on boats to keep all-gee of the hulls also a roofing supply will sell pure zinc strips, you also need some washing soda the rest you will find in you kitchen
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wy6u2kikAA4

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      • #4
        The youtube video is the electro plate process. I'm talking hot dipped.
        Good thought on the marina and the zinc anodes.

        JL................

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        • #5
          Just flux them up with plumber's acid flux and tin them well with old style 50-50 lead tin solder. You then have a very corrosion resistant coating similar to what use to be used to make auto gas tanks, sheet metal roofing, etc., so called Terne metal. Real Terne is actually 10-20% tin and the rest lead. However, I coated some gas tank brackets with 50-50 solder for my old PU and they lasted at least 20 years with no apparent corrosion when I sold it.

          RWO

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          • #6
            There is also a technique where you feed a zinc wire into a small but air blown gas flame. The force of the air is sufficient to blast small droplets of zinc as it melts to hit the target. Gosh, it still exists and not banned by HSE.

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            • #7
              I talked to a guy at a galvanizing supply place. He was real helpful. The pickling or acid wash can be done with muriatic acid followed by a cold water rinse
              and then the flux bath. They use some salt type flux that is diluted with water. I didn't ask him if soldering flux would work. Pure zinc is what is used.
              Boat out drive anodes will work ok I can by the zinc ingots. The stuff is cheap. A steel tank and a propane burner is all that is needed. The zinc starts to melt at 800 deg. and 850 is the preferred temp.
              This is my next project when the weather warms up.

              JL...............

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                The youtube video is the electro plate process. I'm talking hot dipped.
                Good thought on the marina and the zinc anodes.

                JL................
                I had some parts i make for old tractors that needed to be coded for rust more substantial then paint the cheapest and effective way to protect steel was the zinc plating processes. Hot dipping is a more drawn out processes that i did not want to deal with at that time but maybe in the future let me know of the way to do it you come up with

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                • #9
                  I've used sal ammoniac as a flux. Too long ago to trust my memory, but I seem to recall the salt was floated on the molten zinc so that the part passed through it .

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                  • #10
                    Aladdin galvanizing bar-

                    http://www.xpress-test.com/catalog3.htm

                    I've used it to repair Galv surfaces and do small items,it works good,contains all fluxes etc.Just do it outdoors with a fan blowing the fumes away.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11
                      Be sure to bone up on the hazards of molten zinc before starting.

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                      • #12
                        +1 to molten Zn. Watch out for closed chambers, vent them
                        Mark

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by old mart View Post
                          Be sure to bone up on the hazards of molten zinc before starting.


                          Wouldn't a yellow zinc (zinc chromate) plating offer sufficient protection for four rods? What kind of environments will they be exposed to?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by old mart View Post
                            Be sure to bone up on the hazards of molten zinc before starting.
                            I'm going to be doing this out side so ventilation isn't going to be an issue.

                            JL................

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                            • #15
                              I'm a hot dipped galvanize fan myself but more and more I am seeing epoxy coatings in place of hot dipped. What's driving it? Expense, EPA regs, other?
                              I think If I were going to do a home corrosion resistance job I'd be looking into epoxy coatings myself for bother safety and ease of application reasons, after doing a lot more research of course. Apparently the coatings I'm referring to are pretty good though, I see them used on rebar for applications near salt water.

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