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Has Anyone Used These Drill Bits

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  • Has Anyone Used These Drill Bits

    I had to help a friend out the other day. As usual, never prepared and never has the right tools on hand, it's figure it out when you get there. Poor or I should say no planning.
    Any way............... I had to drill a bunch of 3/8" holes in some 1/4" plate. He ran to HD to buy some drills. He came back with these.
    At a first quick glance I though coolant through drills? na, not at HD. Any way.......... they looked real impressive but actually ended up being about the worst drill bits I've ever used in a hand drill. First off, they are way too aggressive.......... they bite in and want to rip the drill right out of your hand, weather you start a pilot hole or not, didn't matter, and when you start to come through the other end they would snag and either rip the drill out of your hand and chip the cutting edge.
    I ended up bending the two reduced (soft shank) 1/2" bits.
    I've never had this kind of a problem drilling any holes in any material with a hand drill as I did with these bits.
    They might be OK in a mill or drill press where you can control the feed, but not in a hand drill.
    And being sold at HD you know that most people buying them are using them in a hand drill.

    JL...................




  • #2
    I would transform the bit, use coolant we use water in a spray bottle. This has worked for more than 50 years. My two bits. John

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    • #3
      Probably why they call them "Shockwave"

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      • #4
        They look like a decent split point, but with more backside relief than usual, which is likely why they are so aggressive. Also maybe a bit more twist per inch.

        I can sure see those breaking through and "screwing right down" in the hole until the end of the flute breaks off the last of the material in the hole.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          I personally won't buy parabolic flute drills or those with very few twists for any hand drill usage. I have some Blu-Mols that are very controllable drilling through thinner metal pieces (say 16-14 gauge.) The others just grab, hit the enclosure behind the panel and snap off. I haven't looked to see if they are still available lately.

          Those Milwaukees do claim to be impact duty. I wonder if that would actually help with not grabbing? The variable helix sure doesn't seem like it would make any difference in thinner metal like the I-Beam they show.

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          • #6
            Agreed, I think they might be for impact guns mainly. Where the grabbing is much less a problem as you don't get torque transmitted to your wrist via impact drivers.

            if I was you, I would hit them up with a diamond hone (at least, ones without chipped flutes.. those need to go to a bench grinder/belt sander) and give them much less relief. That should help them be much less aggressive. Does not take much honing to totally change how the drill bit behaves, Only need to have the relief go back a few thou from the cutting edge for it to be effective.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              It's possible that a tiny bit of "brass honing" on the front of the edges as they are, might be enough to control them. Lots simpler than re-sharpening them.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #8
                I've got oodles of those drills. A whole set of craftsman brand by 1/64th to 1/2". I bought them probably fifteen years ago, not for impact, in fact they probably predate these little battery impacts by a bit of a margin. I never had a problem drilling with them, they are aggressive, but I don't do much hand drilling. I have no idea what the concentric grove is on the tip, but it goes away with a few sharpenings. I normally split the point as well, but not quite as dramatic as how they come from the factory.

                For more drill oddities, I have a set of Dewalt drills that was given to me as a gift. These are the "pilot point" variety, however, they have a very steep helix angle and I believe they also have the concentric groove that your drills have. I'll have to grab a picture next time I'm in the shop. I like the "pilot point" for it's obvious benefits, but for me it's to fiddly to regrind, so they normally don't last through one trip to the grinder with me...

                Later,
                Jason

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                • #9
                  I've never heard of impact drilling steel. I never thought to give that a try while I was at it. The package does say for impact and regular drills.

                  JL...............

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                  • #10
                    They claim the groove is a chip breaker to reduce heat build up. Home Depot reviews look to be love 'em or hate 'em.

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                    • #11
                      I think I'm gonna barf. Red helix is not defined anywhere I have found. No red to be seen on the helix anywhere either. So like "pre-owned" doesn't mean "before anyone has owned it", I think Red or RED is a stand-in for "reduced" as in the helix angle drops from 35° to 15°. Stupid pointless marketing gimmicks. The pre-release preview demonstration of course shows them drilling wood with their metal or hard metal RED HELIX wonder bits.

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                      • #12
                        The images appear to be the way the drills look after being used, and the ring of about 1/2 the diameter seems to be where a previously drilled pilot hole caused some abrasion of the cutting edge and the relief lip behind it. The relatively fast spiral essentially gives the cutting edge a large degree of "rake" which can cause the drill to grab. For thin material, I like Unibits or step drills. They don't seem to grab at all.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #13
                          Increasing Milwaukee=junk,I am not surprised.
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

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                          • #14
                            FWIW, I have some Craftsman branded ones with a point like that that are marked MADE IN USA on the shank. I seem to recall them working surprisingly well, and seeing how abused the 1/4" one is (only one I can find at the moment, and unsure if I had a set or even how I ended up with them in the first place), I clearly preferred it over any of my others in that size. Also, it was regular/round shank for a normal drill chuck, not whatever you call the hex thing used on an impact driver.

                            Last edited by adatesman; 04-10-2016, 09:47 PM.

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                            • #15
                              That image pretty clearly shows an apparently intentional concentric groove that might act as a chip breaker, but I found other chip breaker drills that are ground differently.



                              http://www.somta.co.za/index.php/app.../#.VwsOs3rLweA

                              http://www.bctus.com/chip-break-drills.php

                              Here is a review of the "red helix" drill bit design:

                              http://www.protoolreviews.com/tools/...ll-bits/18480/

                              Last edited by PStechPaul; 04-10-2016, 10:54 PM. Reason: image added
                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

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