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My V blocks

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  • My V blocks

    So I needed something to hold round parts in the vise, so I made myself some V blocks.

    At first I wanted to make 2, with a big V in one side and a smaller one in the other to use with threaded clamps, but then I saw some others with a keyway to clamp them parallel to the table T-slots, so I made another two more.

    Started by squaring a bar stock of F114 steel, 50mm side and 110mm long, with my vise sideways. I selected this steel to flame harden and grind them in the future.
    I make the two blocks at once to make sure the V's have the same size.

    http://s25.postimg.org/g9uo6re6n/IMG...425_154937.jpg

    Milled the lateral and bottom slots.

    http://s25.postimg.org/hsq2bqkr3/IMG...425_212746.jpg

    Put the part at 45 degrees with the help of a technical draw sqare. Was the only way I had but it works pretty well. After roughing the V's:

    http://s25.postimg.org/jzg2b24y7/IMG...426_091225.jpg

    http://s25.postimg.org/3qzu1kw3z/IMG...426_091146.jpg

    http://s25.postimg.org/ag6dhlhfz/IMG...426_091751.jpg

    http://s25.postimg.org/hago7aa33/IMG...427_095525.jpg

    http://s25.postimg.org/go0lk3nnz/IMG...427_095554.jpg

    I made a circular saw blade arbour for a blade that was laying at my home, but It was making a horrible sound so I had to use small endmills to make the reliefe slots. Broke some of them.

    http://s25.postimg.org/dpkso25jj/IMG...427_171315.jpg

    After cutting the part at half, squared the last face and made the holes and the M12 counterbore.







    They are very usefull to make your own transformer!


  • #2
    Turn the links into pictures with this: [img] *picture link* [/img]

    Works on all BB code forums.

    Nice job, do you have access to a grinder to grind them on?

    Comment


    • #3
      I know, but the forum only allow 4 pictures for post, I would have to split it in several ones.

      Not yet unfortunately, I will have to grind them in the future.

      Comment


      • #4
        nice!

        Comment


        • #5
          Very nice job. But I have to ask are you going to be able to flame harden something that big with a torch ?

          JL..........

          Comment


          • #6
            Nicely done.

            Originally posted by DEVILHUNTER View Post
            I know, but the forum only allow 4 pictures for post, I would have to split it in several ones.
            So split it into several posts, or do this:

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks guys!

              Good question, JoeLee. If I can't do with the torch I will have to wait until I get a heat treatment oven.

              This is another great way RichR. I had everything ready when I saw the number limit and took the lazy way. Thanks for posting them!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DEVILHUNTER View Post
                This is another great way RichR. I had everything ready when I saw the number limit and took the lazy way. Thanks for posting them!
                You're welcome. Truth be told, I'm writing a small image manipulation program and your pictures served as test data to create the
                image above.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Keyed tooling ,such as your v-blocks are handy IF the slots in the mill table are uniform. I have seen a lot of import mill tables that the slots varied as to width and straightness. Nice work, Devilhunter.

                  Sarge

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sarge 41 that is an interesting observation you made.
                    I don't hang around import machines and so have not seen that condition..
                    Looking at the posters mill table shows red paint in the keyways, so I am obliged to agree with you.
                    That is a sad state of affairs as it seems many home shop machinists are not aware of this important part of quality machine construction.
                    Keyways were machined in TOTAL alignment with the ways of the mill table. The outside of the table is NOT a required surface for parallelism.
                    Generally the outside surface ( where you may mount your DRO !) can be up to .010 ( .25mm) out of plumb with the way surface.
                    The reason machinery manufactures did this is so you could lay a round rod in the keyway and mill a slot down the middle and more important
                    was the use of attachments like a dividing head and dead center. They have to be aligned perfectly with the table movement and concentricity.

                    I know there is a movement of guys not wanting to use keys, but they are an important part of getting the best accuracy.
                    Skilled machinists understand this and use them
                    Rich

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sarge41 you are absolutely right. I consider the keys in this kind of cheap machines as a quick reference, but if you need something to be precise you always have to go and use the dial indicator.

                      Rich, you are also right of course, in fact in the area of the slots where I put my vise I have stripped the paint because is kinda thick and irregular, but didn't bother to strip the paint in all the slot. But of course, if I'm going to mill something that needs to be perfect, I tram the vise.

                      As Stan said in one of his Shadon HKW videos, your work is not precise if you don't measure it after. Same can be said about the machine and accesories, they are not precise if you haven checked them. For example my vise (import), even having the sides ground, I know it's some hundred's of milimeter convex, so I cannot rely in dialing in the sides.
                      Last edited by DEVILHUNTER; 05-09-2016, 01:49 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Double post
                        Last edited by DEVILHUNTER; 05-09-2016, 01:50 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm not sure I understand the point about keyways, except perhaps that a shaft could be clamped so that it sits partially in the horizontal slot, and then a keyway could be cut along its length while being fully supported. In that case I can see where the slot needs to be rather precisely machined, possibly with a bit of chamfer, so the shaft is well supported and parallel to the table, or at least to the ways so that the axis of the shaft remains at the same distance to the end mill along the length of X-axis travel. I suppose this could be accomplished by using a chamfering mill and running it along each edge of the slots. The paint on the vertical surfaces of the slots would not matter.
                          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

                          Paul: www.peschoen.com
                          P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
                          and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
                            Sarge 41 that is an interesting observation you made.
                            I don't hang around import machines and so have not seen that condition..
                            Looking at the posters mill table shows red paint in the keyways, so I am obliged to agree with you.
                            That is a sad state of affairs as it seems many home shop machinists are not aware of this important part of quality machine construction.
                            Keyways were machined in TOTAL alignment with the ways of the mill table. The outside of the table is NOT a required surface for parallelism.
                            Generally the outside surface ( where you may mount your DRO !) can be up to .010 ( .25mm) out of plumb with the way surface.
                            The reason machinery manufactures did this is so you could lay a round rod in the keyway and mill a slot down the middle and more important
                            was the use of attachments like a dividing head and dead center. They have to be aligned perfectly with the table movement and concentricity.

                            I know there is a movement of guys not wanting to use keys, but they are an important part of getting the best accuracy.
                            Skilled machinists understand this and use them
                            Rich
                            On a vertical spindle machine, the slots will be as straight as the ways and the spindle follows along, whereas a horizontal better be right, unless you have a universal table.
                            Slot widths can vary from standards which means making custom keys. But there is also the school of thought that says anything requiring clearance to fit can therefore suffer misalignment. IMO, a key gets you close and an indicator gets better if needed.
                            It's VERY nice if that outside surface is true in Z! Increases the versatility of a knee mill...sadly, some are not. I'll put a DRO scale on the back and lose a little Y travel
                            if the front is true.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have both the 100mm Bison and the 125mm Chinese vices keyed to the slots in the museum's Taiwanese drill mill. I have to be careful where I place them as the left six inches of the preferred slot deviates about 4 thou, I don't remember which way. I have not yet made keys for the rotary table. Your blocks will probably be fine without hardening and grinding if they are not used in a production environment.

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