Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

today I went horizontal

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • today I went horizontal

    Finally made an overarm support for the Schaublin.
    First impressions: horizontal milling is frightening. And I like it.

    Not my typical video style -- bit of an experiment.

    5/8" cutter, 18T, about 0.4" DOC (wanted to go deeper but realized I had run out of headroom in my setup).
    60 rpm and about 0.5 IPM.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw7Mwd6ey6g


  • #2
    Thanks for the cool video Tony.

    Comment


    • #3
      An impressive piece of work! I particularly liked the technique for cutting the block out of the original rectangular lump of metal. Do tell us the details! I do admit I didn't understand the sequence just before the appearance of the bronze blank for the bearing.
      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

      Comment


      • #4
        great looking machine you've there....when you get used to it you'll want to take a real cut
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

        Comment


        • #5
          0.5"/min is on the slow side of things... You mentioned 18 teeth and 60rpm, so at 0.002"/tooth you'd want ~2.16ipm, and even /that/ is conservative!
          Last edited by adatesman; 05-15-2016, 04:36 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            The bushing for the arbor, any decision process for not boring it out in-place on the overarm? Possibly achieve better/ultimate alignment with the spindle?

            Comment


            • #7
              Nicely done Tony. I always enjoy your projects and the production details that go into sharing them and I'm a better home shop machinist because of it. Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                I do admit I didn't understand the sequence just before the appearance of the bronze blank for the bearing.
                Looked like he used copper + tin + phosphorus to make phosphor bronze. The chili pepper was because you can't melt the alloy without adding heat.

                Dan
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Beatufully done.

                  Tony, that was a great video. It was engrossing, so much so that I did not even notice the passing of time.

                  Technically, it was spot on.

                  Thanks.

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another great video. I like the way you removed the vertical head, it gave me a way to solve an upcoming project of my own.

                    I got a pretty good guess what was in your left hand at 2:18

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      WoW!
                      Great build and machining. Rather aggressive bite for a first pass on the horizontal. I have a small Atlas. It is scary and I take very small bites with it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        WOW nice job! Thanks

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fantastic video and machining.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That was an "artsy" video. Nice mill. Nice work.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=danlb;1049013]Looked like he used copper + tin + phosphorus to make phosphor bronze. The chili pepper was because you can't melt the alloy without adding heat.

                              Oh, thanks for the explanation, I think it was the chilli pepper that confused me.
                              'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X