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today I went horizontal

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  • #16
    Yep, that would have garnered an "A+" in film school.

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    • #17
      Enjoyable, well planned and executed, it's not like you can make one to find out how to make one then film it, thank you
      Mark

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      • #18
        Thanks all. Too kind. But glad you liked it.


        Mcgyver/adatesman: baby steps!


        Rosco: That was actually my first inclination (boring in place) but the spindle and
        the overarms are one piece, to advance the work I would have had to tap it along with
        a hammer. I suppose I could've used a large C-clamp and screwed it through.


        Michael Edwards: at first I didn't realize what you were talking about.. i was worried
        maybe a beer-in-hand or something made it through the editing process. Then I checked
        what 2:18 was. Then it clicked. No lie, my wife came running into the living room
        thought I was having a seizure. Haven't laughed like that in years.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Tony View Post
          Mcgyver/adatesman: baby steps!
          Oh, I quite agree and it takes a while to get used to just how fast a horizontal can peel off metal. First time I ran one (big old Milwaukee, I think) I ran the calcs, thought "that can't be right", confirmed it with the instructor, flipped the feed lever, then hid behind another machine. Yours is nowhere near as rigid as that machine, but capable of *far* more than the cut you took.
          Last edited by adatesman; 05-16-2016, 01:43 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Tony View Post
            Rosco: That was actually my first inclination (boring in place) but the spindle and
            the overarms are one piece, to advance the work I would have had to tap it along with
            a hammer. I suppose I could've used a large C-clamp and screwed it through.
            Lightly tighten the overmarm support onto the overarms, advance it into the boring bar held in the spindle using the table and an angle plate.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Tony View Post
              Mcgyver/adatesman: baby steps!
              o
              if it wasn't clear, I was kidding....making light of just what great material removers horizontals are.
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                if it wasn't clear, I was kidding....making light of just what great material removers horizontals are.
                Flip side of that is 60rpm, 18 teeth, and 0.5ipm is under half a thou per tooth (0.00046"), which will rub the cutter to death. If 0.5ipm is where the OP is comfortable then it would have been better to use 0.002" per tooth and 15rpm. Same MRR, but nowhere near as hard on the cutter.
                Last edited by adatesman; 05-16-2016, 01:55 PM.

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                • #23
                  60 rpm's as slow as I can go. Maybe 55? Like I said baby steps, started at 1/2 IPM and from where I was standing, chips looked pretty good.

                  I say that having absolutely no reference for what the chips off of a horiz cutter should look like. I'll crank it up and post some follow up pictures.

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                  • #24
                    Nice vid. Inspires me to wire up my Nichols which has been mothballed for a while.

                    The table that originally came with it had two very large chunks ripped out of it from slot to slot where a vise had once been bolted. Must have been a hell of a rodeo.

                    Horizontals make supreme tube notchers.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by adatesman View Post
                      Flip side of that is 60rpm, 18 teeth, and 0.5ipm is under half a thou per tooth (0.00046"), which will rub the cutter to death. If 0.5ipm is where the OP is comfortable then it would have been better to use 0.002" per tooth and 15rpm. Same MRR, but nowhere near as hard on the cutter.
                      Hmmmmm.

                      Maybe.....

                      I mean , I agree, but remember ALL horizontal mills doing conventional milling DO "rub" a LOT. The entry to the cut has the cutter edge nearly moving parallel to the cut, going from zero D.O.C. and gradually getting to approximately the set cut depth.

                      Yeah, less "rubbing" if you set up the feed higher, but it's not as if you can totally escape it.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        Hmmmmm.

                        Maybe.....

                        I mean , I agree, but remember ALL horizontal mills doing conventional milling DO "rub" a LOT. The entry to the cut has the cutter edge nearly moving parallel to the cut, going from zero D.O.C. and gradually getting to approximately the set cut depth.

                        Yeah, less "rubbing" if you set up the feed higher, but it's not as if you can totally escape it.
                        No different than vertical milling, actually. But long story short, taking a big enough bite for the cutter to cut rather than rub will help with tool life.

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                        • #27
                          awesome machining and the opera singing/ cutting nearly made me spit my coffee all over my laptop. I do miss the Blaxploitation style though, this was a bit to "artsy" for me.

                          very inspiring though, especially the precision of the multiple bores. That's something that keeps stymieing me.

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                          • #28
                            I have a little Denbigh horizontal, the best cutters are the alternate inclined cut teeth, more shear less thump
                            Mark
                            http://abercutters.com/staggered.html
                            Last edited by boslab; 05-16-2016, 04:09 PM.

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                            • #29
                              at 10:28 the milling vise being used to hold the bushing appears to have a 4 way indexing fixed jaw . What make of vise is it I have never seen such a tool.

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                              • #30
                                Beautiful work and nice video.

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