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Who's Bob and do I want him for any uncle?

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  • Who's Bob and do I want him for any uncle?

    Can a knowledgeable person tell me the background and meaning of "And Bob's your uncle"? My US upbringing failed to educate me on that expression ☺

    Randy
    Do yourself a favor and see if your TV carrier has America One News Network (AONN). 208 on Uverse. It is good old fashion news, unlike the networks, with no hype, bias or other BS.

  • #2
    This should answer your question........... and if my grandmother had wheels she'd been a wagon.

    JL...............

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob's_your_uncle

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    • #3
      It's common, er, at least not uncommon in Canada. I remember its use in the original "A Christmas Carol" movie starring Alastair Sims (who's a double for my Grandfather) so google "Bobs your uncle Dickens". It's noted as a gaff in the movie - Dickens died before Cecil's nepotism.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #4
        I do not know the origin although I suspect it is British/Empire/Commonwealth. The meaning is somewhat like "There it is and easily done."

        Usually used in my experience to conclude a series of steps or instructions to achieve a desired result such as showing a child how to tie his shoe lace.

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        • #5
          Same as ". . and there ya go".

          https://www.google.com.au/search?q=g...d+there+you+go
          Last edited by oldtiffie; 05-21-2016, 09:45 PM.

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          • #6
            When pigs fly.

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            • #7
              My understanding is that it originally meant "and now you know all the details" as in, it's a dark family secret that Bob is really your uncle, and now you have been told everything. Of course, that may just be a local interpretation....

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              • #8
                Bish bosh. Sorted. = Bob's your Uncle in 21st century speak.

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                • #9
                  I first heard the expression in 1972 when I was living in Wellington, NZ. At the time I was making plans for a visit from my Uncle Bob and Aunt Esther, who lived in Seattle, and were on a trip to visit their daughter in Australia.

                  My office mate, pertaining to something we were discussing, concluded with "and Bob's your uncle!"

                  "How did you know?" I asked him.
                  Allan Ostling

                  Phoenix, Arizona

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                  • #10
                    Often followed by a sequel 'And Fanny's Your Aunt'.
                    Max.

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                    • #11
                      The following link is a good site to bookmark. It not only gives you the meaning of the phrase but also the history of how it came about. Very interesting reading.

                      http://www.worldwidewords.org/

                      Type the phrase into the "search" box on the right of the page.

                      EDIT:
                      Scroll toward the bottom of the page for "Kick The Bucket"
                      Last edited by DATo; 05-22-2016, 11:00 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DATo View Post
                        ... Scroll toward the bottom of the page for "Kick The Bucket"
                        I have long wondered how English idioms are rendered in other languages. What would be the French equivalent of kick the bucket?

                        If anybody knows other languages, please chime in.
                        Allan Ostling

                        Phoenix, Arizona

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the replies.

                          Randy
                          Do yourself a favor and see if your TV carrier has America One News Network (AONN). 208 on Uverse. It is good old fashion news, unlike the networks, with no hype, bias or other BS.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I like the rule of thumb.

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                            • #15
                              Is that a metric thumb or an imperial thumb, I've always been amused by rule of thumb, there are so many of them, rules that is not thumbs, and are big toes foot thumbs, guy I know did have his big toe removed and stuck on his hand after getting his actual thumb chopped off, it's an ugly thumb but it works, the blokes used to take the piss (another odd one?) and call him athlete, they reckoned he had athletes hand now and is the only bloke to have a tug with his foot,(have a tug, another name for gentlemans persuit), and he was the only footballer who could touch the ball during play and not cause a hand ball foul if he used his hybrid right hand,
                              Mark

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