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3D print head for your CNC

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  • 3D print head for your CNC

    Has anyone tried one of these yet?

    http://www.performancemotion.com/3dprinting.html
    Gary Davison
    Tarkio, Mo.

  • #2
    How could I. It's a web page showing a neat idea with pictures, then absolutely no information for a potential customer such as: how much does it cost, where could one possibly buy it, etc.
    Here's an idea - if I ever have a product, maybe put a button on the page that allows a guy to purchase one.
    "Science !!"

    hehe

    Looks like a decent idea though.

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    • #3
      That kind of thinking is exactly why you don't have a huge online retail business.

      Online, it's all about selling for a small loss, but making up for it in volume.

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      • #4
        It's ok my project list ti make one of them. You may need to add a hot table but shouldn't be a problem. You can buy complete head extruders in china very cheap. Just add the table and the stepper drive.

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        • #5
          Its just a 3d printhead in a tool fixing, a pid controller for the printhead thermocouple and psu to run the heater for the print head and it appears to have no sort of bed heaters so you can rule out anything but pla prints unless you want to print banana's.

          I have the same parts here but with the exception that the printhead has a mixing 3 feed setup not monocolour, less than $150 all in and I was going to do the same on my bridgeport as a get out of jail card when I needed prints bigger than my 3d printer could cope with but with the exception I also have two bed heater plates and was going to mount them on something to thermally isolate a top surface from the cast iron of the bed. Its a case of the roundtuits so far.
          But... downside to using a mill, 3d printers are light and fast and accurate enough given the dimensional stability of plastic once its extruded, a cnc mill will take hours and hours to print things, masses longer than the lightweight fast 3d printer can do it in, so its strictly a emergency thing for me. I fitted a larger X axis heated bed to my printrbot and am stretching the Z axis when I can find some 1/4 acme this side of the atlantic and now the times I need bigger are even rarer so I may just go with mounting the 3 stream extruder on the printer instead.

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          • #6
            I can see that a mill wouldent be ideal, but I was thinking the other day that whilst it wouldent be ideal that the area of gaskets and seals might be handy, after machining pick up the extruder and print the seals and gaskets straight on, barmy I know but there we are!
            Mark

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dave_r View Post
              That kind of thinking is exactly why you don't have a huge online retail business.

              Online, it's all about selling for a small loss, but making up for it in volume.
              I'm curious; Just how do you sell at a small loss and make it up in volume. That turns a small loss into a big loss.

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              • #8
                I added a 3d print head, heated bed and a set of chinese controls for head temp and bed temp control. The 3d print head made in usa was so bad it wouldn't even work without constant fiddling. Nice looking but very bad design. Got the head extruding then it stopped. Temperature controller melted down due to components running way over rating. Then the heated bed overheated. The solid state relay shorted on! It was way oversized with a huge heat sink too. So I decided to go industrial and control everything with the DL06 plc in my machine using thermocouples. However I haven't finished it yet. My CNC mill has ballscrews, THK linear ways and big steppers so it does 300 ipm without problem so should print reasonably well.

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                • #9
                  At first glance adding a 3D print head to your CNC mill sounds like a great idea, at least it did to me.

                  The more I thought about it, the more I disliked the idea. Why wear out your ball screws, and sliding components on your mill? 3D printing is extremely motion intensive and over the long term would wear out your mill.

                  Would I 3D print a few parts on my mill? Yes I would. But I think there is a valid reason why even Tormach does not offer a 3D print head for their mills. It would be better to build or buy a 3D printer.
                  www.thecogwheel.net

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                  • #10
                    Ditto, by the time you add up all the costs with converting a full size milling machine you will have far exceeded the cost of a good 3D printer. Some people like doing projects, that fine. But if all you want to do is 3D printing either a TAZ 6 or MakerGear M2 would be my suggestions. Plan on spending $2k or a little more, unless you just want a toy.

                    I just looked at the Link in the OP at the top of the thread. The thing is a joke, having owned three 3D printers its clear whoever has designed that kit does not have a clue.
                    Last edited by wmgeorge; 05-25-2016, 09:33 AM.
                    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by boslab View Post
                      I can see that a mill wouldent be ideal, but I was thinking the other day that whilst it wouldent be ideal that the area of gaskets and seals might be handy, after machining pick up the extruder and print the seals and gaskets straight on, barmy I know but there we are!
                      Mark
                      Mark, good idea & I use my 3d printer a lot, but horses for courses and I dont think this is one of them...
                      Your enemy is porosity of fdm 3d printed pieces between the striations. I print occasionally in rubber (ninjaflex) and the piece is rubber like in behaviour but the final print is porus, same for plastic pieces. I'd not be able to run a 3d printed mug off and reliably expect it to hold liquid, not a good trait for gaskets and seals.
                      Far better for this job to get a sheet of rubber or gasket paper and use a drag knife to cut the gasket out.
                      I did think about 3d printing some parts in nylon, then finish machining them to get more accuracy than the process allows, although if you say this on 3d printer forums, of course everyone can print pieces to 0.01mm in pla straight off the machine, and their chinese digital calipers prove it so. But then, I might as well just pick up some stock and machine it out, and have the correct grain structure and less variables in the piece.

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