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Benjamin moore Super Spec HP Alkyd paint for machine tools?

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  • Benjamin moore Super Spec HP Alkyd paint for machine tools?

    I am looking at the Ben moore "Super Spec HP Urethane Alkyd gloss Enamel P22" for my lathe and other machine tool projects down the road. I don't want to go with anything with Isocyanate hardeners and want a step up from regular hardware store paint. after reading the data sheet carefully they do recommend their own primer for new metal surfaces and for best rust prevention.

    Anybody tried this product on their machines? The guy at the counter said they have coated trash trucks with the stuff and it holds up well. Not exactly an equivalent application, I know but not a bad data point either. I thought of buying a gallon (its only about $40USD) and trying it but with primer and all it would alot of paint to gamble on. So if anyone else has any ideas or experience with this paint I'd appreciate it.

    Now the real tough question, should I paint my Rockwell lathe that sandy/almond color that was stock (and someone painted over) or convert it to some form of industrial gray? They will tint it for me so the colors are unlimited. I suppose if I got gray I could use it on other equipment unless I want to transfer my shop into lighter colors over time... man, so many decisions...

  • #2
    I use it onside steel gates and associated structures. Sure good at withstanding the elements and abuse. I'd go for a semi-gloss unless you want to see every imperfection. Not the best brushing paint either... roll with short knap (once or with an immediate back roll.. no delay) or spray are best.

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    • #3
      Alkyd means derived from an alcohol and an acid.
      In most common terms, oil base paint.
      Interesting on the comment that is does not brush well, only rolls well.
      I had the same experience with Sherwin williams alkyd paint on an steel
      man door. Using a brush, it streaked and dragged like hell. I had to use
      a foam roller to get it to lay down. Must be some environmental low
      volatile organic compound (solvent) formulation. I even thinned it and it
      still sucked. I got the door painted and it took 2 coats to cover well.
      I still love Rustoliem and I hope they never monkey with the recipe.
      It paints with a brush well and flows out wonderfully. I can even spray
      it with a pressure cup gun. Bad that stores will not mix it in custom colors.
      I have found 3/4 silver and 1/4 yellow make a nice green color.

      --Doozer
      DZER

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      • #4
        I used the same thing by Sherwin Williams as we were a dealer & it worked great.

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        • #5
          Doozer: you think plain rustoleum works well enough? Should I just do that if I can get the color I want?

          Sent from my SM-S766C using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            I don't see paying $40 for a gallon as much of a gamble. I see the labor to redo it the bigger issue.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              I recently bought a quart of Miller enamel semi-gloss 6780 white tinted 1066 "machinery gray." I had a couple of I belt covers to start with.

              The Miller paint covers well over sound prepared existing paint and Rustoleum red brush on primer (cured a week or so) over exposed metal, tacked off and solvent wipes with a towel dampened with Duco lacquer reducer. I brushed on a thin coat of the Miller gray with a foam brush, al;lowed the thinner to flash and tipped it with a dry foam brush. Two days later I dulled it with a fresh ScothBrite pad, solvent wiped and re-coated with gray tipping as before. The second coat cured semi-gloss with no visible brush marks.

              It's been only two days and the coat hasn't fully cured (I can dent it with a thumb nail) but is passes the tape test and the appearance is very good. If it's possible to enthuse over a color like gray this particular shade would be my choice. It's a bright and satisfying color that looks good under any light. It's too early to test it against stains (black cutting oil, ATF, Prussian blue. layout ink) or solvent clean-up but it looks promising. It's early days to check abrasion resistance. Being merely enamel it has no significant resistance to the chip wash of a machine tool.

              Resistance of a paint system to cleaning wear and solvents, chipping from tool impacts, and handing abrasion are all legitimate concerns and key points to consider in selecting paint systems for machine tools. Generally hard paints last better to a point but cost of purchase and cost of application and prep may eliminate the high performance coating system products to all but high performance applications. I assert since no paint will hold p to a continuous flow of hot sharp chips it would be wiser in the long run to select a paint system that's easy to touch up. Therefore I recommend a one part alkyd or self curing epoxy (do they still make this?) for indoor machine tool service in wet and oily environments.

              I give this Miler (neve rused it before) a good review for color, ease of application, and early cure which is not what the OP asked. He wanted to know the merits of S/W Super Spec alkyd enamel so this response is - um - unresponsive. However it is germane in the broader sense to anyone shopping for paint for machine tools..

              The S/W Super Spec is no doubt good stuff though I suspect it's a re-label of their venerable alkyd enamel, a very good product and a staple of the industry for 35 years to my knowledge. I suggest you buy a quart and try it on some samples you can torture.

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              • #8
                Yes, what Forrest said.

                It may be somewhat different in a home shop environment, but I tend to put paint on a machine tool in the "perishable tooling" category. It's only going to be "perfect" until the first clean up operation, even more so if you use any cutting oils or coolant.

                Dave

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
                  I don't see paying $40 for a gallon as much of a gamble. I see the labor to redo it the bigger issue.
                  Agreed. To do a machine right you're going have countless hours in prep, cleaning and painting. Honestly I think $40 is cheap.

                  I know people that just love Rustoelum. We used a lot of it years ago on the farm but more recently I've found it just absolutely miserable stuff to use. It stinks (opinion of course) it doesn't cover as well and it takes *forever* to set. The Sherwin Williams I've been using is so much better. I had my store color match Rustoelum Smoke Gray. If I wasn't so happy with S-W I'd try the Benjamin Moore. I know its not just me. My mom bought some Rustoelum to paint some metal shelving I gave her that I got at an auction and she mentioned having the same issues. The stuff took days to harden.
                  Mike
                  Central Ohio, USA

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                  • #10
                    Well...its probably $40 for the primer too but I hear you all about the cost in time to do it over.

                    Sent from my SM-S766C using Tapatalk

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                    • #11
                      So far, I've painted seven machines, a vise, a grinder stand, a rotary table, two chests of drawers, a car and a horse trailer with the stuff, and it's holding up remarkably well on all of them.

                      Doc.

                      (Edit- that is, Bar-Ox brand alkyd enamel, not the Moore stuff.)
                      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
                        I know people that just love Rustoelum. We used a lot of it years ago on the farm but more recently I've found it just absolutely miserable stuff to use. It stinks (opinion of course) it doesn't cover as well and it takes *forever* to set.
                        There are many many kinds of Rustoleum. The industrial stuff that comes in gallons and is typically not available in hardware stores works excellent. They have quite an array of just the industrial paint.. mine isn't handy at the moment and I can't recall what series it is. Suffered from none of the issues you speak of.

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                        • #13
                          The best industrial paint I've ever used was the Rustoleum 2 part epoxy paint. Applied it with an HVLP sprayer on machinery frames. Oops got a run, wait a minute where is the run? Self leveled out a run unless it was really big. Hard as rock the next day, ready to install all the components and very scratch resistent.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by softtail View Post
                            There are many many kinds of Rustoleum. The industrial stuff that comes in gallons and is typically not available in hardware stores works excellent. They have quite an array of just the industrial paint.. mine isn't handy at the moment and I can't recall what series it is. Suffered from none of the issues you speak of.
                            The last Rustoleum I'll ever buy was terrible.

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                            • #15
                              Alkyd enamel is one of the best paint's for machine tools. I painted my 10EE with it and it is resistant most stuff.

                              I will say, make sure you use the optional hardener. if you dont it takes about 2 years to fully cure. I had to strip my lathe and repaint before I found this out. Two weeks of sitting outside and it was still tacky.

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