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  • Small Shaper Build

    A gentleman in Australia has built a small shaper, about 9" overall height x 4 3/4" width x with a base 10" long. The ram has a stroke of 2 3/8". Apparently the plans were published in a magazine, but the original plans were too small to suit him, so he scaled everything up be approximately 50% larger. He has a build thread in progress over on Home Model Engine Machinist and even has a video of the finished shaper running. He was a draftsman at some point in his life, but never got into CAD, so he asked for a volunteer to do all his sketches with a CAD program, so I volunteered. This is a very neat project. I can not lay any claim to the actual "design" at all, but I am working with his hand-drawn paper sketches and modeling it for him, in preparation for pulling off a complete set of computerized drawings. I know many of you would be interested in this, so here it is at about 75% modelled.----Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Hopefully the rocker arm is made of a stretchy material. . . . There doesn't seem to be any provision for motion! Well, unless I'm missing something of course--no doubt that's it.

    Jim

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    • #3
      http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...=model+shapers
      best small shapers I've seen .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jim2 View Post
        Hopefully the rocker arm is made of a stretchy material. . . . There doesn't seem to be any provision for motion! Well, unless I'm missing something of course--no doubt that's it.

        Jim
        You're not missing anything. But Brian did post that it's still a work in progress. Otherwise the blue bar in back would have fallen to the floor already.....

        Brian, as someone that has only dabbled with my CAD program's 3D abilities and gotten chased back to strictly 2D I can honestly say that you've put quite a lot of time into this virtual build and done a really fine job of it. I look forward to seeing the final product if you're willing to share it.

        EDIT- Just got back from that link in studentjim's post and gotta say..... wow..... simply wow...... Fantastic work. I'm going to go back and read the whole thread but didn't want to bump it being so old.
        Last edited by BCRider; 06-06-2016, 04:15 PM.

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        • #5
          I was sent most of the magazine article of that shaper.....good stuff. And I thought my homemade shaper will be small, at 3.5" stroke!

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          • #6
            BCRider--I did most of that on Sunday. 3D is extremely fast if you are working from existing sketches.---Brian
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Andre3127 View Post
              I was sent most of the magazine article of that shaper.....good stuff. And I thought my homemade shaper will be small, at 3.5" stroke!
              Which magazine is the article from? I think I have it, but my memory is a bit fuzzy.

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              • #8
                Interesting post Brian, way cool!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                  BCRider--I did most of that on Sunday. 3D is extremely fast if you are working from existing sketches.---Brian
                  That's easy for YOU to say! I've played a little with Sketchup and a bit with the 3D side of my preferred TurboCAD program. But I find all too often that the tool I need is either in the more costly "Pro" version or that I'm not thinking in the proper 3D mode and "extrude" myself into a corner or can't make things cross over each other correctly or any host of other issues.

                  Basically I hit the foothills of the "learning slope" and as soon as it steepens up I go back to what I'm happy with.... 2D. I'm sure it would be fine if I put in the same learning time as I did originally with 2D but so far I just have not seen the need for what I do.

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                  • #10
                    As a thought/paper excercise I've thought about a shaper a few different times. One option I think I would go with is using a hydraulic drive system for the ram and cross feed. Using either switches or a mechanical linkage to shift a four way two position valve body to control the ram travel with simple Parker type ColorLine flow control valve to control ram speed. The cross feed is controlled by a pick feed cylinder that gets its stroke controlled by either an adjustable stop or a series of set stops that give fixed amounts of feed. The down side of course is heat, noise and leaks. I used to use shapers a lot and prefered to use a Rockford hydraulic over a mechanical Cincinnatti when I had a choice. As to the pump, just how much flow and psi does a powersteering pump out
                    Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                    • #11
                      BCRider--I taught 3D modeling part time for 3 years. It is great stuff, but pure Hell to learn from books or tutorials. You really need someone who has used it a lot to teach you 'hands on".
                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                        BCRider--I taught 3D modeling part time for 3 years. It is great stuff, but pure Hell to learn from books or tutorials. You really need someone who has used it a lot to teach you 'hands on".
                        That, my friend Brian, is the absolute gold plated cast in stone truth for me. How I wish I had someone to take me through
                        a 3D CAD like that!!!

                        Oh well...

                        Pete
                        1973 SB 10K .
                        BenchMaster mill.

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                        • #13
                          I am absolutely excellent at spatial relationships, but absolutely terrible at learning 'puter stuff by reading. Terrible at
                          learning many things by 'reading'. I learned AutoCAD when it was in DOS only 'cause there were folks there to show me.
                          And I learned the new versions up to V14 the same way. After I lost the learning connections, I tried desperately to learn
                          more by reading and, later, other systems by reading. No joy. Total failure. Tried recently with TurboCAD and Fusion 360.

                          Sorry,
                          Pete
                          1973 SB 10K .
                          BenchMaster mill.

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                          • #14
                            Well, "reading" isn't really the right word used by itself. "Self teaching" would probably be closer. It seems I can get just so
                            far and then I hit a wall. Even when I put it aside, or back off some, for a while I still seem to hit a wall. It's so frustrating! Time frame; months. So I don't think I'm trying for 'instant'...
                            I just keep pickin' at it but don't seem to make much progress is all.
                            I think one of the problems is that I seem to expect the program(s) to be more 'intuitive' than they are. Another is that I
                            will be looking for functions that just aren't there that I consider basic functions, like 'offset' in AutoCAD. There, it's simple.
                            In TurboCAD, it just ain't!!

                            Oh well, I'll keep lookin' and tryin'.

                            Pete
                            1973 SB 10K .
                            BenchMaster mill.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers
                              The biggest part of using 3D modeling is to think about the parts right. If you get in the right way of looking at it, you can model up parts well and fast.

                              It helps a great deal if you have a good imagination and can "see" the part in your head. Some can, some cannot.
                              I most certainly agree with that. For me I've got the ability to see the parts in 3D in my head but it's the tools for doing it in the different packages. I can understand the idea of extruding and using one object to cut through another to do something like making a "hole" in a plate or other part. But it's finding the tools that do that.

                              I've only ever done it on my own. And truth be told I've done a few basic things. One time I "built" a model airplane wing with ribs, spars trailing and leading edges including the center line dihedral and even the dihedral braces. But it was a long and painful process figuring out with "pencil" (tool) did which feature.

                              While I expected that the learning slope would be steep no one told me I'd need pitons and life lines.....

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