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OT electrical help with camper trailer

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  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by fishfrnzy View Post
    In the wiring diagram it id show electric brakes, the guy I bought it from said it had them. I had a brake controller installed on our Durango before picking it up. Got it home and crawled underneath and if t has electric brakes the must be some new marvel type because there is just a 6 bolt hum on the end of an axle. No wires going into axel or to a drum, no drums and no disks. The trailer only weighs about 1600 lbs empty so I think they use one diagram for many models, lengths and options and you ignore the information not relevant to yours.

    Thanks once again to all who replied.
    If you ever decide you want brakes you can buy fully-loaded brake assemblies- everything from the backing plates to the shoes, ready to bolt on.

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  • fishfrnzy
    replied
    Ok, so as not to leave any dangling threads. I couldn't set the trailer up until I went to use it last weekend and the cell phone reception where I was at was insufficient for internet. Anyhow, the green wire is for charging the converter. In the wiring diagram it id show electric brakes, the guy I bought it from said it had them. I had a brake controller installed on our Durango before picking it up. Got it home and crawled underneath and if t has electric brakes the must be some new marvel type because there is just a 6 bolt hum on the end of an axle. No wires going into axel or to a drum, no drums and no disks. The trailer only weighs about 1600 lbs empty so I think they use one diagram for many models, lengths and options and you ignore the information not relevant to yours.

    Added on edit: The green wire was to the converter and charges the battery. Meter read 12.97 VDC when plugged into shore power.


    Thanks once again to all who replied.
    Last edited by fishfrnzy; 06-23-2016, 03:18 PM.

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  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by IdahoJim View Post
    I think breakaways are only required on dual axles or more. Single axle trailers may have them, but not required by law.
    Jim
    It varies by state. NY requires breakaways on any trailer with brakes, regardless of axles. My Jayco fold-down had hydraulic surge brakes with a breakaway device that pushed and locked the master cylinder pushrod.

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  • dave_r
    replied
    Originally posted by IdahoJim View Post
    I think breakaways are only required on dual axles or more. Single axle trailers may have them, but not required by law.
    Jim
    It likely depends on specifically where the trailer lives and works.

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  • IdahoJim
    replied
    I think breakaways are only required on dual axles or more. Single axle trailers may have them, but not required by law.
    Jim

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  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    The old breakaways were wired as shown. (Can't speak on newer styles.) They had a self contained battery in a box. When the pin was pulled, it shot 12v+ from that battery straight to the brakes. The 7-way was completely out of the picture since on a "breakaway" there won't be a 7-way connection.

    It was up to the owner to keep that battery charged. It was nothing more than an add-on accessory.

    Oh, and you could use a breakaway kit on any trailer with electric brakes. Not all trailers have a battery like a camper, etc.
    Still that way today. Some breakaway batteries are charged with a little solar panel, some through the brake-light circuit, and some not at all.

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  • CCWKen
    replied
    The old breakaways were wired as shown. (Can't speak on newer styles.) They had a self contained battery in a box. When the pin was pulled, it shot 12v+ from that battery straight to the brakes. The 7-way was completely out of the picture since on a "breakaway" there won't be a 7-way connection.

    It was up to the owner to keep that battery charged. It was nothing more than an add-on accessory.

    Oh, and you could use a breakaway kit on any trailer with electric brakes. Not all trailers have a battery like a camper, etc.
    Last edited by CCWKen; 06-18-2016, 08:39 AM.

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  • darryl
    replied
    I think there's an error in that diagram where the breakaway is. Braking can be had through the 7 way connector to the vehicle, but not from the on-board battery. If the breakaway goes open circuit when activated, then it is normally shorted, which would remove voltage from the brake wire by shorting that output from the trailer brake control in the vehicle. If the breakaway goes shorted when activated, then it is normally open and will short the current to the brakes just when it's needed, but still not getting activated by the on-board battery. Black from the breakaway should go to black on the 7 way, not the blue as shown. Unless I'm completely out to lunch-

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  • vpt
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Not necessarily on a DC system. They often use black for ground/negative.

    I would not use green in a DC system unless all the other colors had been used already and I really needed another color to allow easy tracing of the circuit. It can cause confusion.
    I have found that when it comes to 12v systems and automotive no color is safe for any assumption. Honda for one loves to make black wires (sometimes with yellow stripe) 12v+. They also primarily use green wires for the 5v+ systems.

    I assume nothing in auto/trailer 12v wire colors. If I am checking wires I check them all for voltage +/-.

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  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by fishfrnzy View Post
    Again, the trailer does not have brakes.
    According to the wiring diagram, it does- or did- have electric brakes. Maybe someone hacked up the original wiring.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    You keep saying that you are taking resistance measurements. I would caution you to completely disconnect the battery and any charging device (converter?) before doing this. If the battery or another DC source is connected you may instantly destroy your meter.

    Another caution about making DC measurements. A meter uses a small (1.5V to 9V) DC Voltage to measure resistance. The point is this is a DC Voltage and polarity does matter. So if you reverse the meter's leads, which reverses the polarity, then you can get widely different resistances readings at the same point. Keep this in mind when making resistance readings.

    You have the wiring diagrams (they are NOT schematics) so you should be able to figure this out with some head scratching.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Not necessarily on a DC system. They often use black for ground/negative.

    I would not use green in a DC system unless all the other colors had been used already and I really needed another color to allow easy tracing of the circuit. It can cause confusion.



    Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
    Green is generally a ground wire. That is what I would suspect.

    Brian

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  • vpt
    replied
    The diagram shows the 7 way plug.

    One wire from the 7 way plug (one that plugs into the truck) will have 12v+ when the key is turned on in the vehicle. This wire is for charging trailer batteries and will be ran from the 7 way plug to the battery with the fuse on it (the green or the red wire). The other 12v+ wire (green or red) would then go to the converter in the camper to run said equipment in the trailer. When plugged into 110v the converter like said converts the 110v to 12v to run the equipment and also sends power to the battery for charging. I always get a spark (or resistance) threw my "power in" wire as well because I believe it "powers up" the converter.

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  • wmgeorge
    replied
    This is pop up camper no brakes. I can not see the diagram that well but the camper more than likely has a 4 wire flat connector, no charging of the battery from the tow vehicle. The battery will charge from the Convertor when plugged into 120 volt. If the wire is really green and OEM it may not be a ground. The diagram clearly shows a black wire and nothing green.
    Last edited by wmgeorge; 06-17-2016, 08:59 AM.

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  • fishfrnzy
    replied
    Did I mentioned that I was electrically changed? Thanks everyone for your help. I'll try what Ken and Carl suggest.

    Leave a comment:

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