Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Obsolete machine tools,when were the last ones made? Please chime in

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Obsolete machine tools,when were the last ones made? Please chime in

    I would think many of the members of this forum have worked for machine tool manufacturing companies.I thought it would be interesting if people would share actual first hand knowledge about the last days of production of various iconic machine tools, such as jig borers ,shapers,horizontal mills, ect.I am not wanting to talk about to relative merits of these machines,but just wanting information. Yesterday I was using a precision grinding vise that I made back in 1965 ,I used this to grind parts for Gilette razor blade dies.The company that I worked for had just bought SIX BRAND NEW TAFT- PIERCE MANUALL SURFACE GRINDERS.These machines were a a work of art.So does anyone no when the last Of these and other icons were made.Please chime in.Edwin Dirnbeck

  • #2
    Shapers probably aren't being built anymore, but manual surface grinders, horizontal mills certainly are. I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere there are jig borers being built still, likely for use making other machine tools.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jimmer12 View Post
      Shapers probably aren't being built anymore, .
      I would say not really, they have just changed or morphed slightly into railway rail planers and are now also used extensively for manuf elevator shaft slides.
      They operate on the same principle as the planer, just the larger machine envelope.
      Max.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post
        I would say not really, they have just changed or morphed slightly into railway rail planers and are now also used extensively for manuf elevator shaft slides.
        They operate on the same principle as the planer, just the larger machine envelope.
        Max.
        Interesting, thank you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jimmer12 View Post
          Shapers probably aren't being built anymore, but manual surface grinders, horizontal mills certainly are. I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere there are jig borers being built still, likely for use making other machine tools.
          Chester Machine Tools here in the UK currently catalogue both shapers and slotters in range of sizes up to 1250mm stroke. Where they are made, I don't know, except that its most unlikely to be in the UK, and where the customers are for this size and type of machine, I don't know either.

          I would though, be extremely surprised to find a current supplier of planers, which I believe to have been out of production anywhere for about 50 years. Manual capstan lathes?
          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

          Comment


          • #6
            Had a recollection of hearing that shapers are still being built in India. See, for example: http://www.sugunaindustries.in/shaper-machine.htm

            This website also shows slotters and planers.

            David
            Last edited by old_dave; 06-19-2016, 01:29 PM. Reason: Additional comment

            Comment


            • #7
              Almost all of the old machines are still being made in India.
              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi,

                I think the Chinese still make things like shapers and planers also.

                Dalee
                If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think obsolete is the wrong word. Obsolete is tied to use; something that is no longer useful; fallen into disuse, outmoded etc. Sneaky b*****d manufactures have tricked you into think the word means "we no longer make it, so bend over, 'cuz you're going to have buy a whole new___________now). Don't give in to their trickery...their parts aren't not obsolete, it was just time to hose ya again.

                  imo none of these machines are obsolete. Perhaps in certain segments like commercial use they're largely done, but shapers and horizontal mills and even planers are still used and doing work. Each has attributes that makes them uniquely useful for certain applications and being useful is the antithesis of obsolete - ie home shop or jobbing repair shop etc.

                  It is astounding what the Indians make. i sometimes wonder if a decade ago someone came across a WWII machinery catalogue washed up on a beach and proclaimed "this is what we must make to make American customers happy"
                  Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-19-2016, 05:45 PM.
                  .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    German company named Klopp still makes a shaper:
                    http://www.klopp.de/en/klopp-machine...aping-machine/
                    Personal website

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If Hauser is still in business and building jig grinders then they are still building jig bores. Whether they are built in Switzerland is another matter http://www.lathes.co.uk/hauser/ No technology is ever truly obsolete. it may be outmoded. It may be out performed. but it can still be useful. After all a fire hardened wooden spear is still useful if one finds ones self stranded in the wilderness.
                      Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Silly question, isn't it? They are still making manual lathes and mills, they are obsolete.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I exchanged a few messages with a person who was looking for large industrial shapers. They were wanted for placement in a "third world" country where they could get the job done and also be maintained locally. If your electricity comes from a diesel generator and you can grind HSS tools much easier than get new carbide inserts the shaper could make a lot of sense.

                          cheers,
                          Michael

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Michael Moore View Post
                            I exchanged a few messages with a person who was looking for large industrial shapers. They were wanted for placement in a "third world" country where they could get the job done and also be maintained locally. If your electricity comes from a diesel generator and you can grind HSS tools much easier than get new carbide inserts the shaper could make a lot of sense.

                            cheers,
                            Michael
                            How about a cnc 4 axis shaper?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                              How about a cnc 4 axis shaper?
                              A planer is just a different form of a shaper, I once retrofitted a dual head planer to CNC, cuts 4 different axis on two rails, if that counts.
                              Max.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X