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Dust Collection for Abrasive Chop saw & Belt Grinder.

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  • Dust Collection for Abrasive Chop saw & Belt Grinder.

    Rather that re-invent the wheel, I thought I would put the call out to see who has come up with a cost effective system to collect dust & grit from a chop saw and/or belt grinder.

    Pat

  • #2
    These work quite well- filters out fine plaster dust.

    http://www.oneida-air.com/inventory....E06240A24A4%7D

    Full disclosure: my nephew works for the company.

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    • #3
      It has been my experience in industry that any system that will work really well with wood will work with grinding particles/dust.
      The gotcha is that the particles are heavier, so need plenty of air flow, and won't lift as high as wood particles.
      Cyclone separators are excellent. Just make sure the bucket under it is metal. Those particles can get 'warm'.
      The fine filter won't normally see 'warm' but you can get fire resistant filters.

      I really like Onida stuff....

      I have Dust Deputy I use in the wood shop. It's great!!

      Pete
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

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      • #4
        How does it work with any sparks coming in from the chop saw / belt grinder?

        Pat

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 10KPete View Post
          It has been my experience in industry that any system that will work really well with wood will work with grinding particles/dust.
          The gotcha is that the particles are heavier, so need plenty of air flow, and won't lift as high as wood particles.
          Cyclone separators are excellent. Just make sure the bucket under it is metal. Those particles can get 'warm'.
          The fine filter won't normally see 'warm' but you can get fire resistant filters.

          I really like Onida stuff....

          I have Dust Deputy I use in the wood shop. It's great!!

          Pete
          be really careful with those particles. Iv seen them gather up in areas, then with exposure to new hot particles and lots of air, end up catching fire and burning very hot. Definitely make sure any tubing from the tool to cyclone separator is 100% fire proof.

          Steel burns surprisingly well in the right conditions, even with just atmospheric oxygen. If you don't believe me, set some steel wool on fire!

          IMO the best way to deal with grinder dust, is do it outside where you get plenty of fresh air to breath and the dust getting god damn everywhere is not an issue.
          Last edited by Black_Moons; 06-20-2016, 01:51 AM.
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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          • #6
            I agree with Black_Moons: "IMO the best way to deal with grinder dust, is do it outside".

            I only use the 14 inch chop saw outside. Many a time I have layered up and dragged the chop saw outside and set it in the snow to make cuts. I would rather be really cold for a while (or in the sun in the summer) than to have the prolonged smell after using an abrasive blade.

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            • #7
              So far my dust collection has all been on the wood working side of the house. But one thing I have learned for sure is that the design of the catch hoods is probably as or more important than the airflow.

              High CFM collectors cost big bucks and run very noisy. And even then if not aided by good collector hood design the air flow can be wasted.

              But when the collector hoods are set up so that they make the most of the inertia of the particles/dust and combine that "head start" with good airflow design around the mouth of the hood it's surprising how well even a modest CFM dust collector can perform.

              In a way working with the metal and abrasive particles from a chop saw or belt grinder is easier than working with wood dust that loves to remain airborne for a longer time. A good collector hood should take advantage of the flow of the metal coming off the blade or belt so that the core of the flow is aimed right down the throat of the collector pipe. From there rely on the flared out sides to collect the spray from the remainder.

              Getting in close and tight to the source also pays. For an abrasive chop saw this means a sheet metal collector hood which wraps around the back of the saw and extends up as best it can around the blade cover and even up almost even with the back of the fixed jaw of the built in vise. By maximizing the wrap around the rear of the blade and machine you pick up more of the spray of metal and abrasive particles as well as speed up the airflow at the mouth of the hood by "blocking" it with the saw and blade guard. And a faster mouth velocity aids in pulling in particles that would otherwise bounce or fly out into the air around the operator.

              A belt grinder poses other challenges. First of all is the tendency of the metal to travel with the belt. Even to the point of going a good way around a roller and part way up the next flat run. So a good pickup hood design will want to be open at the end of the working area to grab the initial spray but it should wrap around and follow the next wheel after the working area if the wheel isn't the contact point already. It should also follow around part way from the exit off that wheel to catch the particles that stick and want to travel with the belt for a way.

              For some belt grinder hoods it can also pay to Y the collector tubes and have one at point just after the contact working area and another at the end of the following end of the hood to directly pick up the particles that are shed off the belt further along past the wheel used as the contact point or which is right downstream of the flat platten contact point.

              I have not got around to building my belt grinder yet but I've been looking and considering the dust collection issue since I know a bare belt on a belt grinder will throw stuff from here to next Thursday. And I don't need all that metal dust and abrasive sprayed around the shop and settling on the motorcycles or machine tools. So this idea of a long "backside" collector hood with the two pickups set on tangential angles to work with the natural direction of travel of the particles has been pretty high on the list of design factors. The real trick on a belt grinder is to arrange some super fast and easy way of changing the belts and end rollers. In the end it may not be possible/practical to work with the idea of switchable "front ends" with different contact wheels and flat platten options and use only one collector hood. I may need to use a couple of different ones. And if that turns out to be the case then I need to figure out how to best switch them out so it's fast and easy.

              In contrast the abrasive chop saw collector hood would be a piece of cake.

              I've obviously fixated on the collector hood aspects here. The others covered the advantages of using all metal tubing and all metal cyclones for both the fire and abrasive issues. And excellent points they are. A metal particle collection system has no place for anything that can either melt or burn along the run.

              I know that using things like sheet metal for the collector hoods and common heating ducting for the run to the cyclone collector made with a galvanized garbage can is going to be prone to wear from the particles. But for home use I suspect it'll be many years before the metal wears through and then it'll be fairly easily replaced. I don't see it justifying the use of heavy gauge and very expensive tubing. Although perhaps the hoods themselves could be made from something heavier so they last. But for all the ducting I'd go with heating duct used so all the internal lips are facing downstream and tape over the seams on the outside to avoid air leakage.
              Last edited by BCRider; 06-20-2016, 01:56 PM.

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