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Review: Grizzly 1.5HP G7948 12 speed 20" Drill Press

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Of course, it is possible that the design has been downgraded in the time since I purchased those two machines.
    I'm guessing ^this is the case. I can't imagine a plastic nut holding the pulley to be adequate for the job.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Glug View Post
      Too bad you didn't return it when you determined it was plasticized, etc. Seems like that should have been a dealbreaker. Though their return policy is surprisingly unfriendly in the modern era of Amazon.

      I have a 15" Jet I bought 20 years ago. It's been a good DP. It's smooth and quiet. I recently acquired a 1970 Powermatic 1200, so the Jet has to go. Kinda sad about that, since it was my first DP, and it would be nice to keep for woodworking, etc.

      If I were you, I'd replace that DP with some American iron.
      Love to....we'll see if I can find one.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        Any DP of the general size and power being discussed ought to drive those hole saws with no problem. If they don't, they are messed up, for sure. Like buying a 4 axle dump truck and finding it won't haul over a ton.
        Thanks....that was the major point of my review.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          Forrest, that may not be fair.

          1) if a similar HF DP did the job, it would be fair to assume the Griz would do it. We did it at a prior employer with some cheezy DP approximately equal to a Western Auto unit. Holes up to 2 1/2" diameter or so.

          2) There's hole saws and hole saws. The sheet metal hole saws are basically annular cutters, although they actually take more oomph than some of the bimetal holesaws that look like ones for wood. I've used both kinds of saw with DPs and with hand-held drills to cut 10 gauge and similar metal, They were never an issue, although the hand held tended to be a "workout". As far as I know, all the hole saws are effectively piloted. Some with solid pilots, others with drills, but there is nobody stopping a person from putting in a solid pilot where the drill goes.

          I don't see it as that unreasonable to expect that a 1.5HP DP should do things that can be done with a Western auto or HF drill press, or with hand held drills.

          I suppose it is possible the OP was going overboard with feed rate/pressure, we have no idea, and there tend to be two sides to these situations. What he writes is reasonable, although I would have made a metal nut first and tried that.
          Just to answer your question about feed rate/pressure....I tried what I'd done in the past which with say a 1.5" holesaw....it would take a minute...maybe two to drill through 1/8" steel. It's hard to quantify the amount of force I exerted on the old HF DP's handle....but it wasn't what I'd characterize as even medium effort. You're trying to cut, not bind after all. The Grizzly simply wouldn't do that....You could put very light pressure (probably not to exceed 10 lbs.) on the handle and it would stop the spindle with the 2" holesaw.

          I did have the tapered insert for the pulley re-threaded so I could install a metal nut....haven't put it in yet to see if it'll solve the problem. I'll post the results.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
            Humm, I have to agree with Forrest. I have purchased both the Grizzly and the HF models of the 20 inch DP. The Grizzly about 7 or 8 years ago for my former employer and the HF for myself about two years ago. They look, operate, and perform much the same.

            I have not tried using large hole saws in either, but I would not hesitate to do so.

            My complaints would be a high noise level and a hard to use depth stop on both. The Grizzly did have a threaded rod for depth control, but I hate the use of regular nuts on those and I purchased a quick adjust nut for it. The HF has one of those dials on the spindle spider and I hate that even more. It is impossible to make a really precise adjustment. I plan to make my own depth stop as soon as I get the rest of my shop up and running. Both of them are quite noisy and I also plan to do some balancing on my HF.

            I was confident that the HF would handle this operation so I ran out to the shop. I could not find any 3/16" steel, but had some 1/8" so you can multiply the times by 1.5. These are some brackets that were the wrong size and I obtained about 20 of them free when the OEM replaced them. I don't know the alloy, but they are a bit harder than hardware store steel. They were to support some rather heavy, rack mounted equipment. I found a 1.5" Milwaukee hole saw on it's arbor. This is a good brand, but I don't know if it ranks with the best. The hole saw is quite sharp but the center, pilot drill could use some dressing. Anyway, here is the overall shot:



            Up close and ready to drill. I used some plain oil for cutting fluid, nothing special. The speed was set at the lowest setting: 180 RPM.



            It took about 30 seconds for the pilot drill to penetrate the 1/8" steel. As I said, it needs some attention at the grinder. The hole saw only took about one minute to go through the 1/8" steel. I did not have to use any excessive pressure and the DP did not seem to slow up by any appreciable amount.



            It's a hole! So, for 3/16" I think the times would have been 45 seconds for the pilot drill and around 90 seconds for the actual hole saw. I think I have taken longer to saw wood with similar drills.

            I believe the Grizzly I used would take a similar amount of time.

            It is possible that the Chinese have switched to these plastic parts in the last year or so. I did not see any plastic working parts in the Grizzly and I do not see any on the HF.

            ***EDIT***Apologies....I didn't realize you clarified your position before making the below post.***

            Paul...
            You agree with Forrest....but my Grizzly drill press (with a 2" hole saw) wouldn't do what your Harbor Freight one did in your test. Forrest seems to be saying your and my drill press shouldn't be asked to do it....yet yours did it with ease. I guess I'm failing to see why you agree with him, considering your drill press just accomplished what mine could not.

            You mentioned that you didn't see any plastic parts in the Grizzly. If you get a chance, open your top cover, get a ladder (if you need it) and look at the nut holding your spindle pulley to the spindle. Is it plastic? I'm curious at this point.

            Thanks,
            Sean
            Last edited by Sean K.; 07-03-2016, 03:30 PM.

            Comment


            • #21
              I have the Grizzly 20" DP. There is a strong possibility that my 2005 version is actually not even made by the same company that makes the ones they sell today.

              Mine has the plastic nut on the forward pulley. That was a problem the first time I used it, but it hasn't given me any fits since then.

              The machine is definitely not a finished piece of art; the table is very crude, the slots are very rough. But it has done everything I asked of it for the last 10 years. The run-out is not great, but hey! It is a Chinese drill press, not a mill.

              I don't know if I have every tried to use a cheap 1-1/4" hole saw to cut through 1/4" steel, but I know that I have cut a 3/4" hole through 1/4" steel plate with a large twist drill, and it handled it without any problem. Slow and easy is always my motto when cutting through thick steel like that. I am not a production house, and I don't want to smoke my drill bits.

              I will say that I would rather use my mill to drill or cut big holes like this.

              Comment


              • #22
                I have the bench top version of this drill press. It's not work of art, but it's not junk either. The alignment of the motor, countershaft and quill is not great and the supplied belts were garbage. I put dayco belts on it and it will drill 3/4 in steel with no problem now

                Comment


                • #23
                  Sean, I just looked and checked with a magnet. It IS a steel nut. I also looked at the parts list and if the drawing there is accurate, it seems like the "Insert-Pulley" that the pulley sits on and the nut fits on has a taper for the pulley to sit on. I believe you mentioned this in your first post and I looked up the Grizzly manual for this model (G7948) and it also appears to show a taper fit for the pulley.

                  If the pulley sits on a taper, then could too much grease/oil at assembly be the cause of your problem? Perhaps if you disassemble it and clean out the majority of that grease or oil, it may work OK. Or use some Loc-Tite thread locker on it. Just a thought.

                  On that nut, I noticed that mine is also a left hand thread. I attempted to take the nut off but it was quite tight and holding the smaller pulleys did not provide enough torque: the belts just slipped. I guess I would have to use a strap wrench on the pulley or something fabricated. Anyway, I had hoped that the Grizzly and the HF/Central part were interchangeable. But I was able to get a caliper on the exposed threads and their OD was around 26.8mm so no go. It really would have been nice if you could order the Central Machinery part and have it fixed.

                  One last thought, I do not see why this nut needs to be grade 5. I would think any grade left hand nut would be OK. Heck, you could probably use a right hand nut and a bit of Loc-Tite and it will be OK. The nut does not take the torque, the taper does.

                  OTOH, this is a Grizzly problem. I think you should put your complaint in writing and send it to them by registered mail, with return receipt. State that the DP is NOT suitable for the advertised purpose that it is intended for. And demand all of your money back along with the shipping costs. Demand that they pay for return shipping AND CRATING or make whatever shipping AND CRATING arrangements they want if they want it back. Be polite and business like: no cuss words. Just explain why it does not work correctly. Do it in writing, not just verbally on the phone and KEEP A COPY along with the Post Office receipt showing who signed for it. That should get their attention.



                  Originally posted by Sean K. View Post
                  ***EDIT***Apologies....I didn't realize you clarified your position before making the below post.***

                  Paul...
                  You agree with Forrest....but my Grizzly drill press (with a 2" hole saw) wouldn't do what your Harbor Freight one did in your test. Forrest seems to be saying your and my drill press shouldn't be asked to do it....yet yours did it with ease. I guess I'm failing to see why you agree with him, considering your drill press just accomplished what mine could not.

                  You mentioned that you didn't see any plastic parts in the Grizzly. If you get a chance, open your top cover, get a ladder (if you need it) and look at the nut holding your spindle pulley to the spindle. Is it plastic? I'm curious at this point.

                  Thanks,
                  Sean
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Oh, and if you paid for it with a credit card, start a complaint with the CC company. They can work wonders with the threat of a reversal of the payment. Get this started as soon as possible, and again DO IT IN WRITING and keep a copy. Don't worry about any 30 or 90 day limits, just do it.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                      Sean, I just looked and checked with a magnet. It IS a steel nut. I also looked at the parts list and if the drawing there is accurate, it seems like the "Insert-Pulley" that the pulley sits on and the nut fits on has a taper for the pulley to sit on. I believe you mentioned this in your first post and I looked up the Grizzly manual for this model (G7948) and it also appears to show a taper fit for the pulley.

                      If the pulley sits on a taper, then could too much grease/oil at assembly be the cause of your problem? Perhaps if you disassemble it and clean out the majority of that grease or oil, it may work OK. Or use some Loc-Tite thread locker on it. Just a thought.

                      On that nut, I noticed that mine is also a left hand thread. I attempted to take the nut off but it was quite tight and holding the smaller pulleys did not provide enough torque: the belts just slipped. I guess I would have to use a strap wrench on the pulley or something fabricated. Anyway, I had hoped that the Grizzly and the HF/Central part were interchangeable. But I was able to get a caliper on the exposed threads and their OD was around 26.8mm so no go. It really would have been nice if you could order the Central Machinery part and have it fixed.

                      One last thought, I do not see why this nut needs to be grade 5. I would think any grade left hand nut would be OK. Heck, you could probably use a right hand nut and a bit of Loc-Tite and it will be OK. The nut does not take the torque, the taper does.

                      OTOH, this is a Grizzly problem. I think you should put your complaint in writing and send it to them by registered mail, with return receipt. State that the DP is NOT suitable for the advertised purpose that it is intended for. And demand all of your money back along with the shipping costs. Demand that they pay for return shipping AND CRATING or make whatever shipping AND CRATING arrangements they want if they want it back. Be polite and business like: no cuss words. Just explain why it does not work correctly. Do it in writing, not just verbally on the phone and KEEP A COPY along with the Post Office receipt showing who signed for it. That should get their attention.
                      Lube on the taper was one of the first things I checked. No go there. I was afraid of a mismatched taper from the pulley to the insert....but the new one seems to be a match.

                      Honestly, I'm going to try the LH nut I bought and the new 1 1/4-12 LH taper I had cut into the insert. I'm betting that solves the problem since yours was so tight and your nut was metal.

                      You're right...no need for grade 5, but I found one from Global Industrial, so I just went with it.

                      I may try the written request....but I've already been told company policy is to fix the broken one, so we'll see. But I agree.....keep it professional.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        Oh, and if you paid for it with a credit card, start a complaint with the CC company. They can work wonders with the threat of a reversal of the payment. Get this started as soon as possible, and again DO IT IN WRITING and keep a copy. Don't worry about any 30 or 90 day limits, just do it.
                        Again, thanks for the advice. I appreciate it. One other BIG THANK YOU for going out and checking the nut with a magnet. Again, really appreciate the effort on your part.

                        Thanks,
                        Sean

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by tmarks11 View Post
                          I have the Grizzly 20" DP. There is a strong possibility that my 2005 version is actually not even made by the same company that makes the ones they sell today.

                          Mine has the plastic nut on the forward pulley. That was a problem the first time I used it, but it hasn't given me any fits since then.

                          The machine is definitely not a finished piece of art; the table is very crude, the slots are very rough. But it has done everything I asked of it for the last 10 years. The run-out is not great, but hey! It is a Chinese drill press, not a mill.

                          I don't know if I have every tried to use a cheap 1-1/4" hole saw to cut through 1/4" steel, but I know that I have cut a 3/4" hole through 1/4" steel plate with a large twist drill, and it handled it without any problem. Slow and easy is always my motto when cutting through thick steel like that. I am not a production house, and I don't want to smoke my drill bits.

                          I will say that I would rather use my mill to drill or cut big holes like this.

                          I'd rather use a mill too....but I'm not fortunate enough to own one currently. I too had no problems with this DP drilling up to 7/8" step drills through 1/4" plate....I don't think it would have problems with a 1" bit and 1/2" plate....provided I drilled a 3/8" pilot first......now that I think of it, I'm pretty sure it's done exactly that.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Just installed the new 1 1/4-12 LH nut and pulley insert/pulley back into the DP. Needed a 1/2" thick by 1.5" OD slug for another project so threw in my 1.75" holesaw and some mild steel hot rolled 1/2" plate.

                            Took about 3-4 minutes to drill through. Probably took only about 1 minute to get through the first 3/8"....the last 1/8" made me slow down to blow out chips as it cut. The spindle did stop 3 times from binding with all the chips....but that was my fault, not the machine's and is pretty normal with that depth of cut and a hole saw....at least it was with my HF DP.

                            Anyway....so it appears the problem is simply a cheap nylon nut and either incredibly poor foresight in the engineering department or cost cutting measures that shouldn't be implemented if one is going to call a piece of equipment out as being specifically for "metal working".

                            [IMG][/IMG]

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Can i give you a tip for using a holesaw on thick plate? Drill a couple of holes on the outside (or inside, if you want a hole and not the slug) that will intersect the kerf of the saw. It will give the chips somewhere to go and will make the whole thing much easier.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                                Can i give you a tip for using a holesaw on thick plate? Drill a couple of holes on the outside (or inside, if you want a hole and not the slug) that will intersect the kerf of the saw. It will give the chips somewhere to go and will make the whole thing much easier.
                                Thanks for the tip. .....though doing it the way I did was acceptable to me in terms of time it took.

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