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Drawer Liners for Tools That Can Rust

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  • Drawer Liners for Tools That Can Rust

    As some of you may know, I am in the process of cleaning up a lot of rusted tools that I had in storage for too long. Tonight I tackled a small plastic drawer that had some tapping tools in it, handles and guide blocks and some thread gauges. Most of the rust was on the top side of the tools: I think some humidity or even a little rain got to them. One surprise to me was that the bottoms were also rusted. They were sitting on some of that rubber like foam that they sell for shelf and drawer liners and I could see the pattern of the foam on the tools. The rust was where they had contacted the foam. And some were sitting on some paper towel which I had wrongly assumed would retain some oil and help to prevent rust. It didn't do either.

    My question is, what is the best drawer or shelf liner for tools that can rust. If I reline these drawers, I want to use something better.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  • #2
    Zerust 91132 Anti-Rust And Corrosion Drawer Liner Amazon has it & I'm sure others
    Will protect your tools and toolbox from rust and corrosion
    The non-slip feature holds tools in place and protects drawers from scratches
    Drawer liner is non-absorbent, mold-resistant and cleans with soapy water
    Can easily be trimmed for a custom fit
    Cleans with soapy water - trims for custom fit
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

    Comment


    • #3
      Wood. I rarely ever see a tool rust in a wood box/drawer, especially if the wood has soaked up some oil from the tools over time. The wood acts as a humidity barrier, its why they build humidors out of wood.
      Andy

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      • #4
        Originally posted by vpt View Post
        Wood. I rarely ever see a tool rust in a wood box/drawer, especially if the wood has soaked up some oil from the tools over time. The wood acts as a humidity barrier, its why they build humidors out of wood.
        One can also treat the wood with linseed oil - greatly reducing its ability to absorb moisture.

        Comment


        • #5
          If using linseed oil I'd use boiled.
          "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
          world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
          country, in easy stages."
          ~ James Madison

          Comment


          • #6
            See: http://www.corrosionvci.com/blog/vci...ing/vci_paper/
            gvasale

            Comment


            • #7
              Use any kind if oil, except cooking oil which could have salt. Even unscented baby oil (mineral oil) could do the job quite well.

              I have experienced some issues with wood rusting tools, but I also have a homemade tool in a homemade black walnut box that although is an acidic wood, has no rust issues. You could always try using a paste wax used for floors as a vapor barrier.

              Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

              Comment


              • #8
                That stuff looks like what I have been using but mine lacks the chemical treatment for preventing rust. Perhaps I can just get some of the rust inhibiting paper and put a piece in each drawer. Perhaps under the present liners.

                Any comments on that?



                Originally posted by flylo View Post
                Zerust 91132 Anti-Rust And Corrosion Drawer Liner Amazon has it & I'm sure others
                Will protect your tools and toolbox from rust and corrosion
                The non-slip feature holds tools in place and protects drawers from scratches
                Drawer liner is non-absorbent, mold-resistant and cleans with soapy water
                Can easily be trimmed for a custom fit
                Cleans with soapy water - trims for custom fit
                Paul A.

                Make it fit.
                You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                Comment


                • #9
                  The basic issue with rust is nearly always humidity. That alone can be an issue, or there can be other chemical assaults as well.

                  I found that white and yellow wood glues were a potent rust producer, even after curing for weeks. But hide glue does no such thing.

                  Anyway.....

                  One way moisture becomes a rust producer is temperature changes inducing changes in relative humidity.

                  In a non-absorbent but non-sealed toolbox, perhaps of metal, perhaps of plastic, changes of temperature cause air flow in and out of the box. Warmer air carries more water, and if it goes into a box containing cooler metal tools, the reduction of temperature can cause some moisture to condense out on the metal of he box and/or tools. Nothing else exists that will change the relative humidity, the box is non-absorbent. The condensed water is a rust inducer.

                  The condensed water may not evaporate, depending on the air flow around and through the box, as well as temperature. It may build up, or it may be transient, but when present, it rusts tools.


                  The very same thing in a wood or other absorbent box adds a humidity buffer. When the air moves through the box, the wood tends to absorb water from humid air, and give back water to dry air. This buffering action can tend to prevent saturation and condensation. If water does not actually condense, then rusting is much reduced. Wood commonly has a low moisture content.

                  Since wood can absorb quite a bit of water, and airflow through the closed box is low, the buffering action is likely to have more capacity than is needed to keep down the humidity and avoid condensation. Wood boxes indeed do not seem to be prone to much tool rust, so the theory is supported to some considerable extent.

                  Wood is also an insulator, and it is likely that it tends to prevent large temperature swings of the tooling contained in a wood box, which will also reduce condensation and resulting rust.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • #10
                    I read this article several years ago. It is a very good review of the 'rust preventers' on the market. Some are good - some are trash. It was surprising seeing some of the pics in the test.

                    You'll have to sign up for free to read it. It is worth the trouble.

                    http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-t...reventers.aspx

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I know the pva wood glue gives off water vapour for ages, it is about 80% water I was told, I did think of doing a weight test but no balance available, someone with a balance could do that easily, dry a weighed sample in a toaster oven or somthing, rust is a major problem for me too, pisses me off somthing terrible!, machinists and toolmakers boxes have traditionally been made of wood, I had a couple that were fairly oily, stuff still rusted so I got a bag of silica gel, oven dried it (changed colour to show dry, blue I think as it made me think of anhydrous copper sulphate) I got some little tins, ointment ones, punched holes and put one in each draw, no more rust, annual drying was nessecary, I would recommend that solution.
                      Monitoring warehouse humidity and temperature where new rolled steel coil was stored was a chore in work, we had literally hundreds of thermo hygrometers, they had horsehair filaments to detect moisture and move a pen on a roll chart, I got to change the horsehair regularly, pain in the arse but not as much as a pia as it was for the horse I suppose.
                      Not all oil coatings are good either, the lighter oils whilst making a film easily have so much volatiles that they don't stay coating for very long, once the VOC goes airborne there's just patches of protection, I've had moderate success with synthetic engine oil I had left over from the cars oil change.
                      I was told that cedar wood is good to fend off moths ( I love moths myself, but not so keen on clothes variety), gives off some smell?, I'm learning woodwork so anything that isn't pine is new!
                      Perhaps there are better woods?, im doing a cabinet making course in September lasting a couple of years, toolmakers boxes was on my list of projects, ones that include a desiccant compartment in each draw,
                      Mark

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                      • #12
                        JT covered most things nicely. Just to add it's best to stick with softwood as hardwoods are variable. Oak is bad and very unsuitable for toolchests except the drawers were made of softwood and the contents used daily so oiled too. Beware sweat which is acidic. On the absorber front cover machines with cotton sheets or wool blankets which breathe and absorb moisture like wood not plastic which sweats.
                        Here's a thought - if metal must be used would zinc sheet provide galvanic protection to tools placed on it?

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                        • #13
                          On the sweat thing, the girls packing in the old Ali works had to wear gloves to protect the Ali from them, apparently ladies sweat becomes even more corrosive every 28 days, if you see what I mean, a finger print eaten into a bit of an airplane can ruin it, it was easy to identify the culprit though.
                          Mark

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                          • #14
                            Something to think about.
                            Wood is good. Even the tannins in oak (which can cause corrosion of steel) can be sealed.
                            Oils were mentioned. They can develop a disagreeable odor over time in a closed space.
                            Shellac won't. Easy to apply and re-apply, seals anything, won't stink.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              I found that white and yellow wood glues were a potent rust producer, even after curing for weeks. But hide glue does no such thing.
                              Hide glues can be reversed with some heat; that could be good in the future when a drawer rebuild is needed.

                              Gorilla Glue requires moisture in order to cure. I wonder if this would be a good choice of if it has some other undesired side effect.

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