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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Stories? Whatever.

    I can and do turn MT shanks for tooling. It's a bit fussy to do, but most things that you want accurate are like that. No idea why you would consider it difficult or, as it seems, impossible.

    Arbor with turned taper



    Some more





    Originally posted by GEP View Post
    My opinion never use any abrasive object or tool to clean up a MT. MT reamers are made for that
    Really?

    I guess you DO realize that the tapers were ground with abrasives to begin with..... Unless they are in one of the cheapest asian products. I DID see a drill press that had a turned socket,it was as rough as a cob, they never ground that one, just roughed it.

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  • GEP
    replied
    My opinion never use any abrasive object or tool to clean up a MT. MT reamers are made for that

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  • Duffy
    replied
    A few years back, I recall a company advertising a taper socket cleaner/refurbisher. I THINK that it was a hard urethane with very fine abrasive embeded. They offered all common Morse tapers. Anybody recall the name?

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  • GEP
    replied
    I have a live center that i made from scratch years ago, with a # 2 morse taper shank i use it when ever a need a live center the MT is accurate and seats perfect. I machined it on a South Bend Lathe there is no problem turning MT on any lathe

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  • Carm
    replied
    " Okay, fire way. Let's hear all your stores about turning accurate Morse tapers. But, I won't believe a single one. "

    Okay, no stories then.
    Don't need a Monarch, don't need a DRO.
    Morse tooling is a cakewalk compared to a tapered journal 24" OD with a liquid nitrogen shrink fit $10grand bearing done an old lathe.
    Not like you can take it off centers and blue multiple times.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by becksmachine View Post
    So why would it be more or less difficult to accomplish this in a home shop environment? Many members here have world class machine tools capable of duplicating work and products that would be available anywhere else.


    Among many advantages, a DRO really makes turning accurate tapers much more of a walk in the park as opposed to a polar expedition. Using the DRO to set a taper attachment allows a person to generate a theoretically perfect taper as opposed to attempting to mount a sample arbor concentrically and then running back and forth with an indicator to achieve the proper angle.

    It can be done without a pattern using some long range dial indicators, but fiddling with multiple indicators and attempting to remember which direction the backlash should go can lead to altered states of consciousness and promote the development of anti-social rhetoric.

    Dave
    he's wrong about turning accurate morse tapers, a common enough machinists task. All that is needed is a decent lathe with taper attachment. For those not familiar, you check a taper on a sine bar on a plate with an indicator. Getting a taper dead on is a matter of iterations of tweaking the taper attachment, all with the work between centres.

    Making a reamer adds complexity - high treating and grinding. set up a master on a T&CG, and indicate it to zero while swiveling the table. The only part that isn't believable about someone making one, is why they'd bother. I've enough stuff to make one but, its such an effort i can't imagine doing so vs the cost of buying one.

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  • becksmachine
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post
    One thing to consider not doing is using home made Morse tapers in a good quill. It's quite difficult on home shop machines to turn accurate Morse tapers.

    Okay, fire way. Let's hear all your stores about turning accurate Morse tapers. But, I won't believe a single one.
    So why would it be more or less difficult to accomplish this in a home shop environment? Many members here have world class machine tools capable of duplicating work and products that would be available anywhere else.


    Among many advantages, a DRO really makes turning accurate tapers much more of a walk in the park as opposed to a polar expedition. Using the DRO to set a taper attachment allows a person to generate a theoretically perfect taper as opposed to attempting to mount a sample arbor concentrically and then running back and forth with an indicator to achieve the proper angle.

    It can be done without a pattern using some long range dial indicators, but fiddling with multiple indicators and attempting to remember which direction the backlash should go can lead to altered states of consciousness and promote the development of anti-social rhetoric.

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post
    One thing to consider not doing is using home made Morse tapers in a good quill. It's quite difficult on home shop machines to turn accurate Morse tapers.

    Okay, fire way. Let's hear all your stores about turning accurate Morse tapers. But, I won't believe a single one.
    It might be quite difficult BUT...after seeing some of the work done by some of the members here, I have absolutely no doubt that they can turn an accurate taper.
    Last edited by Arcane; 11-03-2016, 04:40 PM. Reason: spelling

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  • DR
    replied
    One thing to consider not doing is using home made Morse tapers in a good quill. It's quite difficult on home shop machines to turn accurate Morse tapers.

    Okay, fire way. Let's hear all your stores about turning accurate Morse tapers. But, I won't believe a single one.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    A reamer can be forced to the side as it cuts the burr, so it can slightly egg the gtapered hole. If you can guide the reamer accurately down center, and feed it slowly so it can only cut high spots, it will work, though.

    The best thing to do other than re-grinding is to attack the individual issues, if possible, with hand held stones. Low spots do not matter much, but anything that sticks up is bad. Or bore the taper and then either grind or ream, so that you are cleaning up a basically accurate hole. Not always possible to do the latter things in the home shop.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 11-03-2016, 01:55 PM.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    Somthing I saw once, it was a brass I think, or possibly phos bronze plug, MT, it had a slot in it and a 1/4" slip stone was in the slot, loose, there were a couple of springs to push the stone, I would assume the plug be stuck in the hole and rotated, it was home made but looked well done, similar idea to a sunnen hone, I often thought about making one to clean my tailstock which is a bit gnarly, just an idea
    the problem with using abrasives of that sort in taper of course is that there is no axial movement between work and cutting tool. If you held a sunnun in exactly the same spot you would likely not get an accurate result. This is why you need an internal grinder or as Jerry suggests a hand held stone. Without something with axial movement, the big burr quickly/instantly goes through the sandpaper or chips the stone away, fixing of the problem promptly stops while uncontrolled material removal from other place continues. Taken to the extreme, the whole taper could end up like a stack of rings. A reamer otoh, if it can cut, doesn't change shape so avoids this.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 11-03-2016, 02:02 PM.

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  • boslab
    replied
    Somthing I saw once, it was a brass I think, or possibly phos bronze plug, MT, it had a slot in it and a 1/4" slip stone was in the slot, loose, there were a couple of springs to push the stone, I would assume the plug be stuck in the hole and rotated, it was home made but looked well done, similar idea to a sunnen hone, I often thought about making one to clean my tailstock which is a bit gnarly, just an idea
    We often had MT spindles out for regrinding in work, bloody nuisance, some ended in the bin, it was easier to replace the spindle than grind it, or if it had been already taken to the limit previously, I often thought that the machines should have a wear limit figure on them like brake disks!, there wasn't a 3 1/2 MT ! Though one of the grinders did just that for me, took the hole out halfway between sizes and inserted a sleeve he ground, it was pressed in and a grub screw to hold it then the internal reground to size, clever guy, old hands take a wealth of experience out of a shop when they leave, the odd one your glad to see go, I suppose I might have fallen in that category, at least with the accountants and purchasing departments.
    Mark

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  • fishfrnzy
    replied
    My experience was 50/50. Bought import from Enco to clean up SB TS. It was bad reamer as I found out. Use a 2.000" piece of aluminum. Make a gauge and mic both sides or fully inspect reamer dimensions before using. Doesn't help to have a larger messed up TS bore.

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  • johansen
    replied
    put the tailstock quill in the spindle and wrap sand paper around a MT taper.

    the sand paper needs to be spiraled around the right way, and you need to use lubrication. 600 grit was about right for my sb 9 quill. i did not need to remove much metal.

    320 grit worked but it was very sticky.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Do not do that.

    Look in, or put marker on a male piece and try it in there. See if there are not actual identifiable spots that are high. Reach in with a SMALL stone on a stick, and take them down. Just the bumps, don;t work elsewhere. The stone will not care if it is hardened.

    That should help a lot, unless the thing is just wallowed out from spinning tools in it.

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