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  • Marking/Layout blue recipe

    Hello all.

    As a real tightwad I have been reluctant to purchase a bottle of Marking blue. I have tried the Sharpie and spray paint methods, neither of which did a decent job. I had a flashback to my apprenticeship days at Zimbabwe Alloys when Terry Byrne our Mechanical Instructor made up a can of blue for us. He used shellac flakes, methylated spirits and gentian violet in unknown ratios.

    My solution has been to buy a can of shellac at the hardware store, dilute some of it at 1:2 with denatured alcohol and add gentian violet until it becomes dark enough. It dries quite quickly and is fairly durable. More shellac should increase wear resistance. The rest of the clean shellac is useful on your wood-working projects.

    Engineers blue or Prussian blue is a non drying paste used when scraping mating surfaces - it never dries. Put some on a telephone earpiece and see who gets a blue ear!

  • #2
    You must be tight a small bottle would last me years.

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    • #3
      Just my opinion but Red Dykem beats the blazes out of the Blue. But the best layout fluid period is Blue Vitriol. Will not flake off. Will not dissolve due to the application of cutting fluids

      http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/se...-vitriol.shtml
      Last edited by Spin Doctor; 07-15-2016, 05:22 PM.
      Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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      • #4
        Sounds like it would cost more to make than it would to buy
        Mike Hunter

        www.mikehunterrestorations.com

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        • #5
          I bought a litre of Dykem for £20 posted, dispensed into 30ml dropper bottles it should last me a while, the spill-proof bottles of blue make great gifts for friends too.

          - Nick
          If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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          • #6
            Have you tried using the purple primer fluid for PVC pipe?

            http://www.homedepot.com/p/Oatey-8-o...5633/100347769

            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

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            • #7
              Who uses layout dye anymore? That's what the DRO is for...

              If I did use the stuff I sure as heck wouldn't bother making my own...
              Keith
              __________________________
              Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                Have you tried using the purple primer fluid for PVC pipe?
                Have you??

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                • #9
                  "Who uses layout fluid anymore ? Me for one, easier to see scribed lines when walking the milling cutter around complex shapes. DRO for marking on machine is good and great for hole positions, for fancy curves still nice to mark out.

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                  • #10
                    I haven't tried using the PVC purple primer. I have plenty of Dykem and it's only $8 on Amazon. And if I have a jar of the primer it has probably dried up by now. But if you are going to make your own, the primer might be a good start. It already has an applicator, and the fluid is probably compatible with adding shellac to make a thicker coating.
                    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                    USA Maryland 21030

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                      I haven't tried using the PVC purple primer. I have plenty of Dykem and it's only $8 on Amazon. And if I have a jar of the primer it has probably dried up by now. But if you are going to make your own, the primer might be a good start. It already has an applicator, and the fluid is probably compatible with adding shellac to make a thicker coating.
                      So I guess the nest time I need to fix my water line I will use the Dykem to prep the PVc before gluing
                      Ed
                      Agua Dulce, So.California
                      1950 F1 street rod
                      1949 F1 stock V8 flathead
                      1948 F6 350 chevy/rest stock, no dump bed
                      1953 chevy 3100 AD for 85 S10 frame have a 4BT cummins motor, NV4500
                      1968 Baha Bug with 2.2 ecotec motor, king coil-overs,P/S

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                        I haven't tried using the PVC purple primer. I have plenty of Dykem and it's only $8 on Amazon. And if I have a jar of the primer it has probably dried up by now. But if you are going to make your own, the primer might be a good start. It already has an applicator, and the fluid is probably compatible with adding shellac to make a thicker coating.
                        Shellac or Lac is dissolved in alcohol not Acetone which is the primary solvent in purple primer.
                        You could make this:
                        A solution of copper sulfate, distilled water, and a few drops of sulfuric acid can be used on machined surfaces
                        But why bother.

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                        • #13
                          Most any solvent based paint or primer applied in a thin film and dries quick works for lay-out paint. It aint rocket science.

                          When I was an apprentice we used a 1 lb cut shellac with a tablespoon of gentian violet per gallon. It was runny but vivid. On forgings and casting where the surface was scaley and dark we first applied a thin coat of white lacquer for background contrast it produced a vivid white scribed line in the violet field .

                          My go-to preference is dark gray any brand hot rod spray primer. It's dark, opaque, dries in a minute, adheres to most any clean surface, has a flat finish, holds up well to coolants, and shows the marks well. And a side benefit, it doesn't make a ragged line if you use a blunted scriber (so it won't scratch a surface to be polished later.) it's cheap and always available. I always have a can in-cycle - and the spray nozzles are easy to un-clog.

                          No need in the world for official made-for-the-task lay-out ink by my way of thinking.
                          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-16-2016, 06:43 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
                            Shellac or Lac is dissolved in alcohol not Acetone which is the primary solvent in purple primer.
                            You could make this:
                            A solution of copper sulfate, distilled water, and a few drops of sulfuric acid can be used on machined surfaces
                            But why bother.
                            Adding a data point here. Although acetone is "primary" in terms of % contents the real workhorse in "purple primer" is tetrahydrofuran.
                            Likely all PVC/CPVC "cleaners'" are acetone, apt for the purpose.
                            Additives in the primer vs. cleaner actually dissolve a surface layer of plastic.
                            Noting this only so that the unknowing don't conclude acetone is a sufficient solvent and go from there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Carm View Post
                              Adding a data point here. Although acetone is "primary" in terms of % contents the real workhorse in "purple primer" is tetrahydrofuran.
                              Likely all PVC/CPVC "cleaners'" are acetone, apt for the purpose.
                              Additives in the primer vs. cleaner actually dissolve a surface layer of plastic.
                              Noting this only so that the unknowing don't conclude acetone is a sufficient solvent and go from there.
                              The point being made is don't throw out a suggestion if you haven't tried it yourself. A Wag could get someone injured. Will shellac flakes dissolve in Acetone? If you don't know, don't suggest it.

                              PVC Clearner
                              Acetone 60-90%
                              Methyl ethyl ketone 10-20%
                              Cyclohexanone 3-10%
                              Tetrahydrofuran 0-10%

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