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  • New Lathe

    So if you had $4500.00 too spend on a new lathe what would you buy Brett

  • #2
    I'd probably look for one of those Hardinge 2nd operation lathes discussed in a recent thread.

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    • #3
      What do you want?
      More importantly, what are your expectations, experience level and requirements.
      A Hardinge second operation would be a nice addition to an already functional shop, but a bad choice as a first machine. A 16" x 8' machine would be good for a person into restoring traction engines, but not for the apartment dweller.
      Make a checklist of your requirements, and go shopping. Don't forget to get an adequate supply of tooling.
      With a budget like that, a very good, well tooled setup for a home shop can be acquired.
      Jim H.

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      • #4
        JCHannum makes a critical point: what do YOU want to do with it? It may not be what I'd want to do with it.

        But, in my case, I'd probably look for a used South Bend "Heavy 10" in really good condition.

        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          First off I don't like that new word. Only thing you will be able to buy new for that money will be Asian or dinky. Asian machines work, but I haven't really warmed up to them yet. There are some really good Asian made machines such as a Mori Seeki, Takawhachi, or however you spell them. I haven't run a High Class Asian machine myself.

          TOS is a posibility, they look good in pictures. Slavic made.

          That money will buy a good used American or European made machine. Shop carefully, tooling is expensive, will sometimes cost more than a bare machine.

          Heavy 10 SB or a 12 Clausing with tooling are good posibilities. Depends what size of work you plan. These are good small to medium machines that are user friendly.

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          • #6
            Good points so far. You must decide what uses you wish to get from the machine, and purchase one to fill those needs. However, this is probably like buying a first motorcycle. At first, that little pipsqueak looks like the endall of your fantasies. The next thing you know, you will be wanting more iron between your legs. Plan ahead. Mike

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            • #7
              I'll throw my two bits in here. You can make little stuff on a big machine, but not vice versa. Sometimes big stuff is even cheaper because it's harder to unload. My experience is there is alot of pressure on the used 9" to 12" machines, but there are some nice 13" and up's for similiar or less bucks. I got my 16/24 South Bend for $1/lb, and the only time I regret it is on moving day. Like everyone else said, size up your needs first, but all else being equal a heavier machine will turn out better work and be more versatile in the long run, for not much more bucks. I dunno 'new' market, only thing I buy new is this electronic crap

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              • #8
                If you get that large lathe giz is talking about, find something with some r.p.m. to it.
                I'd hold out for 1000 minimum.
                Hard to do small work on a slow machine.
                mite

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                • #9
                  One thing you may not have considered is accesories. They can easily double the price of a big machine, triple a small one.

                  I would look for reliable used machine in good shape - you will have more money left to buy the other accesories, tools, and materials.

                  I have a 7.5"x18" lathe with 2,800 rpm. It is a small precision toolroom lathe - great machine, but I wish I had room for a 17"x60". Like most things in life we all make comprimises and tolerate what we have to.

                  Play safe, have fun,

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                  • #10
                    Iam looking at the enco 13 by 40 Gear Head lathe 16 speed part number au111-3310 What do you think Brett

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                    • #11
                      Brett
                      I cannot help you there, we do not get Enco stuff in Canada - they don't like sending catalogs (nor Grizzly). Myself, I would still look for a good used machine - more bang for the buck. Patience and attention to auctions. industrial sales, surplus outlets. You never know what will turn up,

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                      • #12
                        I think the AU111-3310 is a lot of lathe for $ 3,500. You do not list any requirements for the machine, so specific recommendations are difficult. Hi Tony.
                        Location: North Central Texas

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                        • #13
                          Yeah, I would check out the Grizzly or ENCO 13x40 and spend the rest on tooling. Let someone else more into the restoration business wait for the good used lathe.
                          JR

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