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Bought a 16" G & E Shaper Yesterday

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  • Bought a 16" G & E Shaper Yesterday

    I've wanted a small to medium sized shaper for sometime now but was always a day late when one came available in my area. That is until about a week ago when a 16" G & E went up for auction. I've never used a shaper and only know the basics about how to operating one so I'll have another learning curve to deal with but I'm excited. It wasn't cheap but considering the model and condition it's in I think it's not bad, $740 + 12.5% buyers premium. As always (with my purchases anyway) no tooling other than the vise was included.

    If anyone has first hand operating experience with one of these G & E shapers I'd be interested in learning all I can from you. Thanks in advance.

    Ron

    Here's a couple photos.








  • #2
    Sweet looking shaper! Here's some good info if you're new to shapers: http://www.galleyrack.com/images/art...-work-1944.pdf. Have fun with it.

    Jim

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    • #3
      Jim2

      Thank you very much for the link to the shaper training manual. I just downloaded and it's great, I can't think you enough.

      Ron

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      • #4
        I just hope you didn't buy a boat anchor looking at the packing list bag hanging on the back that's half filled with water , this almost looks like our military auctions where stuff sits out side for years then sold , usually paint that has sat outside for a while looks like yours .

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        • #5
          Good catch! Getting the vise with a shaper is kind of a big deal, especially a big one like that! Fun times ahead.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by duckman View Post
            I just hope you didn't buy a boat anchor looking at the packing list bag hanging on the back that's half filled with water , this almost looks like our military auctions where stuff sits out side for years then sold , usually paint that has sat outside for a while looks like yours .
            Way to piss on a guy's parade duckman.
            “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

            Lewis Grizzard

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            • #7
              I would remove the large side cover shown in the third pic. Remove all the oil, water and gunk. Refill with fresh oil.

              I went through this with a 28" G&E. I opened the side cover and the oil level was way too high. Thinking that there was water under the oil, I took a piece of clear tube and plugged the end of the tube with my finger, then I put that end of the tube in the bottom of the sump. Then I removed my finger for a few seconds, and after replugging the tube, I removed it to find out that there was indeed a lot of water in the sump. Not a big deal if you clean it out BEFORE you run it.

              There should be an arrow on the belt guard to show you the correct rotation, it matters.

              There is an army manual floating around for these shapers, I will look it up and post a link.

              Link to manual, Mitts & Merrill bought out G&E http://neme-s.org/Shaper%20Books/Mic...8%20Shaper.pdf


              ME
              Last edited by Michael Edwards; 07-19-2016, 06:39 PM. Reason: added link to manual

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              • #8
                I'm sure you'll find a few skeletons in the closet as you dive into restoring this beast. At best the rusted "bright" metal areas will come back as dark grey surfaces with some "measles" of pitting. But I don't see why this rig can't be restored and look forward to a lot of valid work to come. You're in for a lot of fun learning the machine along the way.

                It can be easily argued that modern milling machines are superior in just about any way we care to consider. But for us machine heads doing our projects for fun instead of profit using a shaper is such a totally different experience that it's worth having one around. You'll quickly find yourself doing some work on the shaper just for the interesting method that is so totally different from a mill.

                That G&E is a LOT larger than my Alba by Elliot 10 inch stroke model. I foresee postage stamp sized chips of metal will soon be flying off that thing....
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #9
                  Running crank-type shapers is pretty much the same small to big. I'm not 100% sure that is a crank-type shaper. I suspect it is a hydraulic shaper, and that's a different beastie.

                  metalmagpie

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                  • #10
                    More shaper references:

                    Nemes shaper page:
                    http://www.neme-s.org/Shaper%20Books..._book_page.htm

                    Hathi Trust shaper books:

                    Planing, Shaping, and Slotting by Fred H. Colvin
                    Mcgraw-Hill, 1943
                    https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?...view=1up;seq=7

                    "How To Run A Metal Working Shaper", South Bend, 1954
                    https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?...view=1up;seq=3
                    Last edited by tlfamm; 07-19-2016, 08:36 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Almost the same as mine. If you have a question, shoot me a line.

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                      • #12
                        I have a 16" or 18" G&E but I'm sure mine has 2 sets of belts all the same brand & height off the pulleys. I bought it from a weld who's dad had a machine shop years ago & I was buying machines, vised, etc for scrap price. He claimed his dad used it on one job but I think mine is older at least it looks simpler. Has a giant vise & handle. Congrats!
                        "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                        world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                        country, in easy stages."
                        ~ James Madison

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
                          Running crank-type shapers is pretty much the same small to big. I'm not 100% sure that is a crank-type shaper. I suspect it is a hydraulic shaper, and that's a different beastie.

                          metalmagpie
                          It's a crank shaper. It has the solid ram, so it's a latter model, probably 16 speed.
                          Last edited by Michael Edwards; 07-19-2016, 09:17 PM.

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                          • #14
                            A good man from my distant past could have made you a feather duster on this machine. Looks just like the one in the shop at the lumber/plywood mill I worked in, circa 1972. I didn't do any machine work, I had to fix forklifts........... Old Alex was, I think, 68 at that time. He was good. He could still weld, and you could tell he had been really good at one time. Later I discovered he had a 2x or so cheater in his hood. Kinda like I have now. Anyway, I guess he was my first mentor, and one of the reasons I have a home shop.

                            TC
                            I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                            Oregon, USA

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                            • #15
                              Looks like it's a nice heavy built machine. Good that it came with the vise. They are hard to find. Provided that there are no "unobtainium" parts missing or broken, you should be able to get it going. Hopefully, any needed parts can be built with tools you already have.

                              Since you said you have no experience there is one piece of advice that I can give you. Figure out how to jog the machine in super slow speed or better yet how to cycle it through a stroke by hand. Shapers are absolutely unforgiving of poor setups or anything that gets in the way. Better to find this out in a controlled manner before carnage ensues. That's one of the first lessons I learned.

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