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Craigslist Ad Burk #4 Mill

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  • Craigslist Ad Burk #4 Mill

    Looks unusual. No affiliation, just saw the ad.

    http://winchester.craigslist.org/tls/5689535260.html
    Last edited by rws; 07-28-2016, 07:21 AM.

  • #2
    That is a Rusnok mill, not a Burke. It looks like a nice one with some tooling.
    Kansas City area

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    • #3
      The head is Rusnok. The rest is a Burke #4 mill. I used to own one. Not worth 3200 for a light duty basically a production mill.

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      • #4
        With 2 vertical heads, you can get some money back. There is tooling also. The Rusnok heads apparently go for biggish bucks if it was deemed surplus.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #5
          I bet he get's $2800+. It's a lot better quality& does a lot more than the chinese do nothing mills & people love benchtops.
          A benchtoppers dream machine IMHO. I'd like to have it!
          Last edited by flylo; 07-27-2016, 03:56 PM.

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          • #6
            I paid $2800 for my Clausing 8520 mill some years ago.
            It was from a school and near mint condition.
            Today I have a full shop with many larger mills.
            I still keep the Clausing, because it is so smooth and tight
            and the tables doesn't weigh so much and moves so easy
            you get great feedback when cutting with an end mill.
            It is easy to feel resistance when cutting, like when the
            flutes of an end mill are getting packed with chips or
            something like that. The only negative, is the Clausing
            8520 has exactly 4.90" of Y travel, which only is a pain
            when I was jig boring out bolt hole circles.
            I just just mentioning it as a price point comparison.

            -Doozer
            DZER

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            • #7
              I think it would be that cats *ss in the small winter gunroom shop in the house. And it's not chinese.

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              • #8
                The price might be on the high end, but it does include quite a bit of tooling, including the extra vertical head, rotary table, dividing head and a good assortment of arbors and cutters. You would probably have a hard time duplicating the cost considering the extras.

                The Burke is a good bench sized knee mill. That configuration is not a production mill.

                Edited to add, the Rusnok milling machine is still manufactured. If you wan one, the bare machine is priced at $3400-$3800. Based on that, $3200 for a much more capable machine, well tooled, is not such a reach.

                http://www.blueridgemachinery.com/im...32_revised.pdf
                Last edited by JCHannum; 07-27-2016, 07:51 PM.
                Jim H.

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                • #9
                  I'd never give that much for a small mill.
                  I learned my lesson with small machines.
                  For the same amount of money you
                  could have and do so much more with
                  a full size mill.

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                  • #10
                    I actually have to agree with that comment,
                    as I am always supporting the argument for
                    larger machines that do more, better work.
                    For me, at the time all I had space wise was
                    a basement shop, and a full size Bridgeport
                    or otherwise was not going to fit the space
                    constraints I had. But for the tradeoff of
                    function verses size, I thought the Clausing
                    was a good balance. Another good choice
                    in that class of machine is the Rockwell
                    knee mill (really stout spindle spline and
                    R-8 also) and the Powermatic knee mill.
                    I think the Powermatic is slightly larger
                    of the two. I believe the Rockwell is just
                    a small bit larger than the Clausing.

                    ---Doozer
                    DZER

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hephaestus View Post
                      I'd never give that much for a small mill.
                      I learned my lesson with small machines.
                      For the same amount of money you
                      could have and do so much more with
                      a full size mill.
                      Though I might sometimes prefer to live in a Barn or Quanset Hut, I suspect that many here live in houses with more limited shop space. Smaller machines therefor benefit from a space saving premium. Not an ideal solution, but definitely a cost effective solution for putting 10 pounds of function in a 5 pound space.
                      I hear and I forget.
                      I see and I remember.
                      I do and I understand.
                      Confucius (孔夫子)

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                      • #12
                        I have a Rockwell/Delta. It was an upgrade from a Benchmaster. My shop is in my basement. In our present home it is a walkout, the previous it was a carry in, thus my need for smaller machines.

                        The Rockwell/Delta, Clausing and the Millrite/Burke/Powermatic are close in size with the latter probably the largest. The Rockwell and Clausing can be dismantled into bite sized chunks allowing them to be gotten into smaller shops. The M/B/P has a large, one piece base and column which makes this problematic.

                        Larger machines do offer advantages, but many home shops simply cannot accommodate them. My basement does not have the headroom or physical space for a Bridgeport. I could not use one even if it were offered at no cost. Absent the imports, small, capable milling machines are limited in quantity. This is why they can and do sell at the prices shown.
                        Jim H.

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                        • #13
                          I have large machines but that little Burke is US made, very well tooled & so versatile with 2 vertical & 1 horizantal head, power feed, etc.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                            I am always supporting the argument for
                            larger machines that do more, better work.
                            I support the argument for having many, many machines. The DSG is not much good for turning the pivots on a balance staff (like .011" dia).

                            A machine like that I would expect to sell for more than a larger machine as its feasible to get down the basement stairs - there's a more demand because of that, and arguably less supply. For the model engineer that would be great set up....not so much so for the farmer.

                            Market value and size don not correlate, at least not in the positive.
                            Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-28-2016, 02:35 PM.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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