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OT? Siting and photos of the extremely rare ringless Goldenrod

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  • OT? Siting and photos of the extremely rare ringless Goldenrod

    Here we have a fine example of the rarest member of the phylum Dutton-Lainson, the much sought after ringless GoldenRod, in summer plumage, in the wilds of Green Bluff, Washington.

    I am so easily distracted. Give me some work that absolutely has to be done and I have no trouble spending 2 - 4 hours modifying an oil can that has been sitting there waiting for 5 years. It became a little more urgent recently as somehow I managed to loose it's big, blue twin that has left lubricating rings wherever it sat for more than 30 seconds for the last 15 years. I kept thinking I would cross paths with it but hasn't happened in the last 6 months so.......

    So I resolve to modify the unused spare unit that was discarded by someone else who had apparently used it to distribute some type of varnish or shellac and then left to dry after it was empty, thus converting it to the most reliable of boat anchors, namely those with no moving parts whatsoever.

    Given that it was really much too light for a proper anchor, the choices were to fill it with concrete or lead to complete the conversion from leaky oil can to boat anchor, or attempt to segregate the original individual parts and then reassemble said individual parts into a completely manual oil can, with none of the no extra added cost options that seem to be included with all new models of this style oilcan. It may be that other members here have benchtops and machine tables that are in constant need of oiling, and this built in feature does an admirable job of fulfilling that need. But that backhoe valve bank project I did 2 years ago seems to have provided sufficient lubrication of those areas in my shop since then and into the forseeable future.

    It only took two attempts to completely seal both the top and bottom caps to the barrel with soft solder, including the holes that resulted when the handle was ripped off the barrel when unsuccessfully attempting to separate the bottom cap from the barrel. I thought this would be necessary to clean the joint to achieve proper solder adhesion, but it wasn't wanting to come apart so I just cleaned around it and applied the solder to the top edge of the bottom cap.

    The real problem area is where the handle is in close proximity to the top cap. Using a propane torch, it proved impossible to seal both areas concurrently. Flowing solder into the joint between the barrel and top cap would loosen the solder holding the handle to the barrel and the handle would then spring away from the barrel. Reflowing the solder to re-attach the handle would cause the solder to run out of the cap-barrel joint. I was finally able to use a soldering iron to seal on area without affecting the adjacent area.

    With some added accessory o-rings I was also able to seal the plunger operating rod and spout connection so that a newly filled can will not leak even if it is knocked over and left laying on it's side overnight.

    The photos show where it has roosted overnight next to the much more common relative, the dwarf version of the ring butt GoldenRod. And for the doubting Thomases among you, I did also photograph it with the fill cap off to prove that there actually was something in the can to leak out.

    Dave


  • #2
    More photos





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    • #3
      Good job! Although, if this is a metaphor - nothing to be embarrassed about, some leakage just naturally occurs with age. If your can leaks, you cannot suffer the indignities of the dreaded 'ring butt', and all attempts fail... accept fate and consider diapers.

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      • #4
        yeah, wrap that oil can with a depends and nobody will even touch it, let alone try to steal it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by becksmachine View Post
          Here we have a fine example of the rarest member of the phylum Dutton-Lainson, the much sought after ringless GoldenRod, in summer plumage, in the wilds of Green Bluff, Washington.
          That's quite a feat - esp. considering that they are not even indigenous to the area - the smaller ones "outcropping" looks like it did battle with something before - would like to know the story behind that...

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          • #6
            Why do people think Goldenrods are so good when they leak like sieves?????
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by loose nut View Post
              Why do people think Goldenrods are so good when they leak like sieves?????
              Not leaking. Marking territory.
              Definition: Racecar - a device that turns money into noise.

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              • #8
                I found the manufacturer of the Goldenrod oil can:

                https://www.dutton-lainson.com/categories.php?cat=31

                I have an old Craftsman oil can that I worked on:



                I had to cut a groove for the O-ring:





                Initially I tried an internal groove, but that didn't work well:

                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

                Paul: www.peschoen.com
                P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
                and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

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                • #9
                  When I was in highschool, I put a 75cc Lawson engine
                  on my bicycle. For a gas tank I used 2 Campbell's
                  soup cans soldered together with a soldering iron.
                  Worked pretty well, and because the solder cooled
                  as I went along, it kinda looked like Tig beads.

                  ---Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by becksmachine View Post

                    The real problem area is where the handle is in close proximity to the top cap. Using a propane torch, it proved impossible to seal both areas concurrently. Flowing solder into the joint between the barrel and top cap would loosen the solder holding the handle to the barrel and the handle would then spring away from the barrel. Reflowing the solder to re-attach the handle would cause the solder to run out of the cap-barrel joint. I was finally able to use a soldering iron to seal on area without affecting the adjacent area.
                    One suggestion is to use solders with different melting temperatures. Higher temperature solder for the handle and position it first.

                    I was going to suggest that a "Little Torch" will offer better heat control than a garden variety propane torch. On reflection, the precision of the "Little Torch" likely is not of benefit in this application.

                    Enjoyed the avian reference.

                    .
                    Last edited by EddyCurr; 07-29-2016, 03:01 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Or, just get a lesser named, but superior can that DOES NOT HAVE A BOTTOM SEAM.

                      There are many cans without a bottom seam. For instance, old Eagle cans usually have no bottom seam. The rule of these things is that oil always get through a seal. The only thing that oil does not generally get through is any solid metals, including solder. Pinholes let out oil. Rubber seals let out oil. Oil can seals let out oil. Most oil can seals seem to be metal crimped around some form of vulcanized fiber gasket, which in itself is not a "seal", as it is somewhat porous.


                      As for soldering close to other things, several methods work. The best are different temperature alloys, and use of a small hot source of heat. A small acetylene torch is good, that seems to be what radiator shops used, back when there WERE radiator shops.

                      With a small hot torch, or possibly an iron, you can get in and out quickly, melting what you want to, and not what you do not. You can build-up solder if you want to, melting each layer into the last. Not so with a big propane torch, or an iron that is not much hotter than solder melting temp.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #12
                        What he said.
                        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am nothing if I am not persistent, or is that pedantic? I suppose stupid and stubborn is in there somewhere also.

                          After modifying the previous unit to fix the leaks, I decided to splurge so I ordered a brand new one from McMaster Carr about a month ago. Partly because I could rationalize needing another one, and partly to test my theory.

                          The theory is that all the cans of this style that I had leaked because they were all used or hand me downs, due to me being
                          such a cheap bastard, and naturally no one would give up a GOOD one, so by the process of natural selection I would end up with all the leaky, POS rejects that no one else wanted

                          Anyhow, I digress.
                          I ordered the same style, one quart, heavy duty pump oiler and, with high hopes, filled it with some relatively light hydraulic oil. It took about 10 days for it to leave tell the tale ring on the bench top. Well crap, I hate it when JTiers is right!

                          I knew that I would have no problem returning said unit to McMaster Carr for replacement, but if they send another one that leaks.......

                          So I composed an impassioned email to the Dutton Lainson company which no one replied to.

                          Hi Folks,

                          I have used your oil cans for many years, and being the admittedly cheap SOB that I am, all of them were hand me downs or acquired second hand.

                          It seemed they all had leaks or other issues that I attributed to their second hand status.

                          Some weeks ago, I decided to splurge and purchased one of your model 120 A1 QT pump oilers from McMaster Carr, so I would have at least one oil can that I would not have to spend hours modifying to prevent it from doing an accurate job of imitating a 1970’s era Harley Davidson and leave an oily ring wherever it sat for 15 minutes.

                          Imagine my dismay to find that the new version is only marginally better as far as leakage is concerned. It is filled with a light hydraulic oil and it seems to be weeping from the seam where the bottom cup is attached to the barrel.

                          I have no doubt that I can return this item to McMaster Carr for either refund or replacement, but I thought I would contact you first to see if you had any advice or interest in how best to remedy this problem. I would prefer a replacement, as I like the pump action style, but if they will leak, I may as well continue finding them second hand and modifying them myself to mitigate this issue.

                          Thank you, David Beck Beck’s Machine Shop
                          Ok, here comes the persistent part, I called the Dutton Lainson Co. and talked to a nice lady, Linda, in customer service. I told her the sad story, and with really no prompting or proof of purchase /from me, she asked me for my address and said a new one was on it's way.

                          Now I suppose there are no guarantees that this replacement will be any less leaky than the others, we shall see. I may just have 2 brand new units on which I can practice my soldering skills, instead of the usual hand me down versions.

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the update Dave, greatly appreciated. We'll be watching this spot with great anticipation.

                            Again, the saga continues.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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