Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

14" Bandsaw trunnions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 14" Bandsaw trunnions

    Anybody here make some? Finally moved the last of my woodworking tools from Dad's garage to mine over the weekend, and broke a trunnion. Up until now I had no idea they were so cheap and cheesy (diecast potmetal). Saw is a 14" delta from around 2000, so it's virtually the same as all other Taiwan imports, and the trunnions appear to be the same for all.

    It would cost about $50 to order some by the time they got to my door, and they'd be the same junk that was on there before. So I'm looking at making a pair, and just wondering if anybody else has had a go also. Stuck between making a weldment out of steel, or just machining a solid aluminum piece. I'd really like to go steel, because it would be more fab work which I like (and don't get to do enough of), but I could crank em out easier and with less effort from solid. Really leaning towards solid, as it would be the least time sucking at the moment for me, and I'd really like the saw back in order.

    My google Fu is weak on this one, and only turned up 1 other forum post where a guy brazed together a replacement out of steel. I'm just curious if anybody else has made one. I find it had to believe more people haven't made better replacements for such a weak and easily broken part.

    I should have it done by the end of Thursday, and post some pictures regardless which way I choose.

  • #2
    I made one. The saw is a 36" Colladay, only has one, cast iron, supporting maybe a 12' sq.ft. table.
    Trunnion was cracked when I got the saw, made in 1913.
    I fabbed the trunnion out of steel, had the table top Blanchard ground, spotfaced the backside, and scraped in the sliding trunnion contact on the column since there is but one, 1" stud & nut holding the whole shooting match at desired angle.
    Waste of time in hindsight, I use angle jigs instead of horsing the table around.
    So, go for it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Check R&D Bandsaws there just down the road from you and are great people to deal with

      Comment


      • #4
        Seems like cutting up some lighter gauge 2 inch angle and welding it together to make a new base or just a trunnion replacement would be far less work and WAY faster than machining out a big hunk of aluminium.

        We're talking about the front and rear "legs" when you wrote "trunnion" right?

        Not all of them are cheap die cast. Mine is cheap sheet metal that flexes like a soap bubble in a wind storm.

        Comment


        • #5
          A trunnion is a part the table rides on when tilting, normally a semi circle that guides a half circle:
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6162836701/

          Edit:
          On my old saw which was worn out, not broken, The iron was worn partway as well so I scraped it and installed automotive style bearing shells between, then turned thick wall pipe to fit inside the shells, cut in half lengthwise and welded a plate 3/8 inside the ends for mounting.
          Could turn/mill etc from solid, but at time it was the easiest way for me.

          Edit two:
          Or for fun duplicate the trunnion on this saw: http://www.recordpower.co.uk/product...w#.V6EZNS0pC9I
          Click on features.
          Last edited by kendall; 08-02-2016, 06:07 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            OK, I had a "Senior's moment" Likely something to do with turning 63 just today....

            I was thinking metal cutting bandsaw and not wood cutting or an upright metal bandsaw. What's worse is that I see he actually WROTE "wood working". So I've got no excuse other than a total web related blackout That changes everything needless to say.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jim pelly View Post
              Check R&D Bandsaws there just down the road from you and are great people to deal with
              Thanks for the link. Pretty much same price as everywhere else, and around $50+ for the pair. My time, and material are "free" on this, and I really don't want to buy another cheap diecast part. I'll check back to them for blades though. Thanks again. Plus I really don't want to have to drive to Brampton.......bleh.

              Originally posted by kendall View Post
              A trunnion is a part the table rides on when tilting, normally a semi circle that guides a half circle:
              https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6162836701/

              Edit:
              On my old saw which was worn out, not broken, The iron was worn partway as well so I scraped it and installed automotive style bearing shells between, then turned thick wall pipe to fit inside the shells, cut in half lengthwise and welded a plate 3/8 inside the ends for mounting.
              Could turn/mill etc from solid, but at time it was the easiest way for me.
              Been flip flopping all day, but now I think I'm just going to turn a 4"od "ring", split it, and weld on the "ears". I'll be able to do more of it at home instead of my planned machining at work. I got busier today than I thought I was gonna be, and machines will be tied up for longer than I thought too. I've modeled it, so I got that far ha ha.

              Originally posted by kendall View Post
              Edit two:
              Or for fun duplicate the trunnion on this saw: http://www.recordpower.co.uk/product...w#.V6EZNS0pC9I
              Click on features.
              Actually machining that one (and the delta one) is more in my wheelhouse than precision fabrication. I'm a way better machinist than a welder, but I'm trying, and learning. Kinda why I now wanna weld up a steel one out of 3 pieces, instead of a machining one out of a solid chunk of aluminum. Plus it will be stronger that way, which is kinda the whole point of not buying one anyway. We'll see what tomorrow brings.

              Comment


              • #8


                There's the "model" next to the remaining "good" one. Whenever I make a replacement part for something I always try and make it better. Afterall the original failed for a reason, no point in copying the failures. I first model up the original as is, then look for the ways to add strength. Be it a fillet here/there or increased wall thickness, material change etc. Most things now days are made to a price point. Quality is a tertiary consideration, and it's pretty easy to find faults that can be rectified in the replacements. Changing the model as I go, and referring back to the original to check clearances/fitment, etc. In this case it's pretty wide open under there, so I'm not worried about interference with anything, but when I am, I try and model the mating part too. In any case, I'm done for the day. I'll scrounge around my garage and try and find some suitable steel (couldn't find any at work). Maybe tomorrow I might be back to machining a solid aluminum chunk, but I think I've got some big solid steel round pieces at home that will do.

                What I'm trying to avoid is sucking myself into building a ring roller that I've always wanted, just to roll the 4" ring for it. We all know how deep those rabbit holes are.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  "What I'm trying to avoid is sucking myself into building a ring roller that I've always wanted"

                  You do know that you signed an agreement to do just that in order to be a member on this board. You need a ring roller. You don't just want one, you need one.
                  It is mandatory that one makes tools to make tools to do a project. I think it is written in bold in the forum rules.
                  How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                    "What I'm trying to avoid is sucking myself into building a ring roller that I've always wanted"

                    You do know that you signed an agreement to do just that in order to be a member on this board. You need a ring roller. You don't just want one, you need one.
                    It is mandatory that one makes tools to make tools to do a project. I think it is written in bold in the forum rules.
                    I thought about that the whole way into work this morning , after striking out at home not finding suitable material to turn the ring from (stuff I had was 3.5" not 4"). Also thought of a way I can bend some material to form the ring (I have a HF hossfeld baby clone), and get the radius close enough to weld up. Then bolt the two trunnions back to back on a carrier, and turn the radius between centers. I think that way will work pretty good. But first I'm gonna head to the shop next door and see if they have a piece of pipe I can turn one out of. I'm 99% sure they would, as I'd really rather go that way no.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I welded up a pair from a piece of pipe of the same radius. If anything they work better than the originals. Mine is a 14 inch delta from the early fifties.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Heh. My trunnion was a lot easier than the one you show post#8. On mine the pivot/lock bolt is parallel to the table top and neither the pivot quadrant or the arc contact surface is fussy, though the fit between trunnion and column was.

                        You won't find a piece of 4" OD pipe. Mechanical tube, mebbe. Wait aminnit, you're in Canada.
                        Could you not cut the bits out of some plate (you did say weldment)
                        And, have you determined why the original broke?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Appreciate your wish to make new trunnions yourself, as I often do the same thing myself. Especially when the part you make is superior to the original.

                          There is one source for bandsaw parts that you may not know about. It's Iturra Design, Jacksonville, Florida, phone 904-642-2802. They don't have a website, but they do have a 260 page catalog of nothing but bandsaw stuff, specializing in the 14" Delta saws. Louis Iturra knows more about those saws than anyone else, and he puts that info in his catalog for free. He stocks the trunnions - $18 for the one without the angle gauge, $20 for the one with the gauge, in 2014. He may know of other stronger and/or cheaper trunnions - well worth a call.

                          If I needed a new trunnion, I'd probably buy rather than make one. I've had my 14" Delta wood/metal saw for over 30 years, and it was far from new when I got it - having been used pretty hard in a brass foundry. I have used (abused?) that saw, milling oak logs that were so big I had to adze the top and bottom surfaces to get them under the guides (12" with riser) and needed both of my sons to help me get them on the table. Cutting rounds up to 3" 4140PH, plate to 1-1/2", 6" x 1/2" A36 angle, railroad rail - that sort of stuff. I've worried about the trunnions, but have never broken one. You said that yours broke in moving. I wonder if someone may have lifted the saw by the table, as I suspect they may be a lot stronger in compression than in tension. Just a guess, though.

                          I'd be surprised if you couldn't find other things you need in the Iturra catalog if you decide to order from them.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            there's a pair on e-bay ,thicker and reinforced,for $29.90 my time is worth more than that !!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dennis 49 View Post
                              there's a pair on e-bay ,thicker and reinforced,for $29.90 my time is worth more than that !!
                              Ah but the experience and fun of doing it is worth more than $29. Not to mention, if you buy it, you're gonna spend more than $29 worth of time anyway

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X