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sheet metal bending question

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  • #31
    I see what you mean. If I can get some time it would be interesting to see if something acceptable could be done.

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    • #32
      Just looking I'd guess a box and pan aka finger brake could do that, it may even be possible on a beam brake if the throat will open wide enough for a jumper plate the size of the flange to fit, the beam clamps the jumper, the jumper clamps the stock, I can do flanged bends on my old Edwards up to about 1".
      Your just treating the folder as a big bending bar, it's useful to get some blocks to allow flanges to be folded with the flange turned up, a square edge is all that's needed.
      I may be proved wrong trying but I'd guess it would work.
      Mark

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      • #33
        When I was doing this stuff the common practice was to bend up the flanges first. But in this case the shape is causing a problem with that method. We can't bend even one flange without the bend extending onto the other "flat" areas that we do not want bent if we are using a finger brake. At least not unless we have a finger brake that has a clear jaw end so the majority of the plate can overhang the front bending leaf.

        The only way to do this shape on a finger brake is to bend the box joints first to shape the truncated pyramid shape. Then bend the flanges as far as we can before the box fouls up on the fingers. Then finish the flange bends by hand given that 'magpie has mentioned that he is using thin easily bent stock.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #34
          Geez, you guys are turning this into a career. I could bend that up on my 3n1 in a few minutes after a finger setup. I've made a number of battery boxes of similar design. The "pyramid shape" makes no difference. If the short side flanges were odd dimensions, It would take me a couple of more minutes to step the bend across. (My fingers are even inches.) I'd do the long side flanges by hand and last since they look opposed to the short side and would interfere with the V-die. Done. Spot weld it up and paint it!
          Last edited by CCWKen; 08-04-2016, 08:47 AM.

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          • #35
            If your 3in1 has a solid bottom die you will have more trouble than you think......

            The original issue was seeing if it would be doable on a B & P bender. Answer is either "almost" or "maybe".
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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            • #36
              Not trying to keep this going unnecessarily long, but I wanted to point out that NONE of these bends are 90 degrees.

              I am pretty good at shop math but calculating the bend angles has thus far escaped me. Each panel is 12" wide at its narrow end, 22" wide at its wide end, and 12" tall. Note that the base is 10" wider than the top, so the two triangles on each side are both 5-12-13 by random luck.

              metalmagpie

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              • #37
                Well, after I cut the sheet into 4 parts the rest was pretty straightforward. Thanks to all. Here's one last picture. In it the shape is just roughly clamped together, but you can see it's going to work. Sorry for all the raggedy protective wrap, it's going to come off next.

                metalmagpie

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