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I'm liking the power hacksaw article in Sept-Oct 2016issue a lot.

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  • I'm liking the power hacksaw article in Sept-Oct 2016issue a lot.

    Not that I intend to build one, cuz I do not.

    What I like is the return to the old-style magazine, with interesting builds. Castings, yet....!

    OK, no blade lifter... but some old ones didn't have it either. It's good looking, and useful. You probably could do gears instead of chain if you wanted.

    It's just a nice type of article. More what I liked the magazines for originally.

    The boring head is another such. Ambitious, useful, stuff that seems more like the "Modelmaker's Dividing Head", and others like it from long ago.

    I know that the articles are only as good as the author submissions, but I can still give George and the rest a "well done" for it.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    I've have Graham Meek's book with several interesting designs and have been thinking about that boring and facing head. It took some reading and re-reading to figure out the feed business, but when I did it was ingenious. It's on my list of things to start on sometime soon. Maybe redraw it in imperial dimensions or at least copy the drawings and add in inch dimensions next to the metric. Yeah, I know my digital calipers can switch inch/metric at the push of a button but I still visualize with in inches.
    .
    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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    • #3
      There's at least one other boring and facing head from back in the "Model maker's dividing head" days, IIRC.

      I already have one boring head, that I don't use, so I don't need to make one. But I like that level of complexity and "maker-ness".

      I would sure hate it if the magazines ever got to be just a vehicle for reviews of the latest Asian machine, the way all the Audio magazines went 30 years ago. And to an extent, the way Home Power, and other ones did later. Those industries got all UL and regulated to where you need a string of certifications to blow your nose..

      So far that has not been the case for home shops, and I hope it doesn't happen.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        I agree great issue.

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        • #5
          I'm personally excited to try a variation on that taper jig from Ted Hansen. If it works on a mini-lathe, it shoud work on my beat-up old 10F.

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          • #6
            I know of a power hacksaw that is for sale for $ 150.00 it runs. Has about 12" cutting stroke with a coolant tank. Don't remember the make. I was not interested i have all the horizontal saws i need.

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            • #7
              I am with J Tiers on the idea of "complexity and maker-ness".

              I built Kermit, my Gary Martin Shaper just to build a complete mechanism from raw castings. It was a very enjoyable project that mostly sits on the shelf waiting patiently for the one job it might excel at. The real pleasure was the challenge in deciding the order of operations and developing any skill sets needed to make each part.

              My current project is building the Downriver Tools Turret attachment for a Sherline lathe. This is a fairly "complex" device that requires accuracy in order to operate. So far the two largest parts are built, so they become the constraints for all the parts that follows. There are 18 B-sized sheets of well done drawings which gives an idea of the number of parts.

              Pete

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              • #8
                I agree that this is an excellent issue. Not only the saw and boring facing head, but the final article on the IH engine.

                I am tempted by both the B/F head and the engine. The saw is a good project and the castings appear to be of very good quality.

                I built the Metal Lathe Accessories boring facing head several years ago, not because I needed one, but because it intrigued me. It was a moderate difficulty build, but doable. I used it once to prove it worked. The building of these projects is no different than engine or model builds. It improves skills, presents challenges and is far better than watching the TV. I am presently building a quarter scale carronade. There are no plans, I am working from drawings, photos, an 1832 reprint and pencil sketches. It will have absolutely no practical value when completed.
                Jim H.

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                • #9
                  I just went through the hacksaw build article last night in more detail. To my mind, some of the most interesting aspects are the setups for machining all the castings. Castings are notorious head scratchers for set up. You've got to decide what features to use to locate on, and then they've all got draft and surface irregularities so nothing is flat or square.

                  So, in photo 15 for instance he's got one part hanging out of a vice, then a second part clamped to an angle plate bolted to the table and the whole thing jigged up to get the feature he wants drilled in the right relationship to something else. In photo 12 he's got a machinist jack set up to do a job where I'm usually digging through the scrap bin for a chunk about the right size and shape to do the job. It's one of those "why didn't I think of that?" moments. And look at photo 21 where he's grabbed the part in a grinder vise, then flopped that over on the drill press table to get at an awkward location.

                  Whether one builds the thing or not, it's an education thinking through the operations as he describes them and learning from things in the photos he never mentions in the text.
                  .
                  "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                  • #10
                    Guys, thanks for the feedback. It can be a guessing game at time trying to gauge reader satisfaction and threads like this really help.

                    We have no intention of simply using industry supplied content to fill the pages. We have had advertisers contribute, but it's always made clear that the article has to be of value for those who will never buy their product. Most get that, but I have had a few memorable exceptions.

                    The lack of big project-type articles can be attributed to a lack of submittals from authors, but lately it's been more because of a lack of time available. For instance, the Titan article from Doug Kelley had some of the best drafting work of any article I've worked on, but there is still a lot of double checking that needs to be done before it hits the pages. When I could find time, I modeled up the components and assembled them in SolidWorks, allowing me to pull exploded views and also check for interferences and clearance issues. Working with Doug to verify the components and get the drawings into a size and shape to fit the columns of the magazine took about a year and a half of on and off work.

                    Fortunately, the other half of the magazine production, Kelly Wagner is doing a great job and I've been able to devote more of my time to the big projects lately. With any luck, this will continue and we'll be able to get some of the others that have lingered too long into the magazine. I'm still not sure I'll be able to get it done in time, but I'm hoping to have a dividing head article in the N/D issue of HSM.

                    Speaking of Doug's engines; I've worked on three of them, the Snow, the Bruce McBeth, and the Titan. I had hoped that one of these days I might build the Snow, but after working on the Titan, I'm leaning more in that direction. I've seen all three running at the shows and the Titan looks to be a great runner. Of course, “one of these days” is going to be a long time from now so that may change.
                    George

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                    • #11
                      I built and sold a similar hacksaw made from a kit. I think it was a Struck brand. I still have the plans somewhere in my files. Maybe tonight when I get home I will look..... I started to build one made from weldments but put it aside when it started to look too clumsy for it's capacity. Some cold winter day maybe I will get back to it!--Mike.

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                      • #12
                        I agree that the hacksaw is a great build, (being in the "late" north, I got my copy yesterday.) One observation though, is why a 10" blade. I dont even know who carries them, while EVERYONE has 12" blades, usually in 14, 18, 24 and 32 tooth counts, either carbon, high speed, or bi-metal.
                        Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Duffy View Post
                          I agree that the hacksaw is a great build, (being in the "late" north, I got my copy yesterday.) One observation though, is why a 10" blade. I dont even know who carries them, while EVERYONE has 12" blades, usually in 14, 18, 24 and 32 tooth counts, either carbon, high speed, or bi-metal.
                          My power hacksaw uses a 10" blade. Getting them is not a problem, Lowes carries ones made by Lennox. McMaster carries 10" blades too. The
                          coarsest standard 10" blades available is 18TPI, so 12" would be a better choice in my opinion since they can be had in 14TPI.

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