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Looking at building a 12 Disk sander

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  • Looking at building a 12 Disk sander

    I have a motor and I am thinking I can build the rest. The mount, the tilt table, and the 12 " disk. Has anyone built one? How thick should the plate be? Thought on turning this? Weld on a motor mount or screw it on, then true it...?

    My plans are pretty much the grizzly. Unless someone knows of a better design?


    http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-D...campaign=zPage

    I look here for good advice.

  • #2
    I built a disc sander using a saw blade for the disc. Worked fine, but I've come to not like the disc- the drum is much nicer to use. Also I switched to a zirconia belt, a 4x36 to fit my drum, and can see no reason to use alox again. These are about 3 times as expensive to buy, but last more than 3 times as long so they are actually cheaper in the long run. I have not worn out the first belt yet.

    One difference between the disc and the drum is that the disc is flat while the drum will make a concave. In practice this doesn't happen because I'm always moving the workpiece around on it and can control where I take material off. My drum has a soft surface under the belt- some foam rubber. I wrap some string around it to compress it, slip the belt over it, then pull the string out. The belt has some give to it, so this also tends to help decrease any gouging you might do by accident.

    This is probably my favorite shop machine, used almost everyday. I still have the disc sander but never use it now.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #3
      I built a twelve inch. then hardly used it.
      But I used a 3600 rpm motor and it wanted to burn instead of sand.
      I always went to the combo belt and disc to do everything. Seemed more versatile.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
        I built a twelve inch. then hardly used it.
        But I used a 3600 rpm motor and it wanted to burn instead of sand.
        I always went to the combo belt and disc to do everything. Seemed more versatile.
        Exactly. Look up spare parts for disk sanders. The large ones use a specially wound motor to have a non standard RPM. So buying a broken disk sander is worthless unless you have the specific motor for direct drive or use some type of home made reduction for a common motor.

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        • #5
          Consider too that it's really tough to change grits easily on a disc sander unless you get one of those new fangled magnetic mounts that allows you to swap plates. Then you can have multiple thin plates with different grits.

          You may also want to consider how expensive a disc is on a cost per square inch of usable surface vs something like a 2x72 inch belt.

          The upside to a disc sander if you can justify buying or making one of the magnetic plate mounts is that it will be much more compact. A belt sander tends to take up a lot of space.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            I have a 12" and DD 24" if your going to all the work of building from Scratch I would build a 15 to 20".My 12"Kalamozoo has a 1740 rpm 1hp works well but table is poor design,the DD24" Max has 1140rpm 3hp 3ph that works fantastic and built like a Tank.You could run a jack shaft and pulleys to get desired rpm.Both have zirconia abrasive and will not be using oxide again,there is green abrasive that suppose to be step above zirconia might try that next time I order.

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            • #7
              I have 12 new 1140rpm 3HP 3 phase motors, they weigh 115# each Williams drill presses uses them so I bought some spares. I had a 15" disc & the plates were 3/8" or at least 5/16". I ended up with a 2HP 12" disc/6" belt 240 sng phase, much happier.

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              • #8
                I was hoping this would be a sander with 12 different discs, all a different grit.

                A local knife sharpener has a rig somewhat like that, but with belts.

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                • #9
                  Don't waste your time on the disk sander. I built a 12" disk sander about 10 years ago. It worked as planed. I used a 1.5 HP motor and a Shop Smith sanding platen. Then about a year ago I built a 2 x 72" belt sander. It is a much more versatile machine. Changing grits on a disk sander is a PIA. On a belt sander it's a quick 15 second swap. I use the belt sander nearly every day and regularly find new uses for it. There are also numerous attachments you can make for it.
                  With a free treadmill from the trash, it cost me about $200 to build it.
                  Randy
                  Do yourself a favor and see if your TV carrier has America One News Network (AONN). 208 on Uverse. It is good old fashion news, unlike the networks, with no hype, bias or other BS.

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                  • #10
                    2X72 is the way I'll go then. Does anyone have a thought on what to do with a 1750 1hp with a 1 inch shaft? I would to use it on the 2X72 but the 1" shaft is stopping me.
                    Yes , I can put the shaft, weld on to it and then turn it down... Thoughts on that or is that a really dumb thought?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by randyjaco View Post
                      Don't waste your time on the disk sander. I built a 12" disk sander about 10 years ago. It worked as planed. I used a 1.5 HP motor and a Shop Smith sanding platen. Then about a year ago I built a 2 x 72" belt sander. It is a much more versatile machine. Changing grits on a disk sander is a PIA. On a belt sander it's a quick 15 second swap. I use the belt sander nearly every day and regularly find new uses for it. There are also numerous attachments you can make for it.
                      With a free treadmill from the trash, it cost me about $200 to build it.
                      Randy
                      I agree the abrasive on disk machines are a pain to change compared to belt grinder which is on my to do list,have components to build a 6" belt grinder.The one thing that is very handy with the disk machine is the large table and large grinding surface.They are very accurate when set correct,I guess that is why the pattern makers and Aircraft manufacturers used them extensively in the past.

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                      • #12
                        Nothing at all wrong with a 1" shaft on the motor. The larger output bearing will more easily take the side loads of the belt tension. You just need to find or make up the proper output pulley to get the right SFM for the belt.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Yea, I was wondering why the heck anyone would need 12 disks on a sander. I mean, coarse, medium, fine, extra fine; that about does it.



                          Originally posted by Glug View Post
                          I was hoping this would be a sander with 12 different discs, all a different grit.

                          A local knife sharpener has a rig somewhat like that, but with belts.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          Make it fit.
                          You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                          • #14
                            In my experience the disc sander is slower but much more accurate than a belt sander because the disc stays flat and the abrasive firmly stuck to the disc. Belt sander the abrasive squirms around and is backed up by a worn platen so it does not make as accurate work. If that matters to you.

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                            • #15
                              If I were to build a disc sander
                              I would size the disc to match the
                              sandpaper discs they sell for the floor sanders
                              like they rent at Lowes and Home Depot.
                              You know you can always buy the sanding
                              paper discs there. I think they are 18" or 22"
                              or something like that.

                              --D
                              DZER

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