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My ArtPrize entry

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  • My ArtPrize entry

    My daughter and her family live in Grand Rapids Michigan. The city sponsors the Grand Rapids ArtPrize, a competition open to anyone to submit works of art to display in various venues (museums, businesses, halls, etc.). Prizes are awarded for various categories. Some REALLY BIG, like $200,000 big, and it is possible to win 2 of the $200,000 prize categories.

    When my daughter and her family attended a few years ago, they said "Daddy could do this."
    Well, now that I'm retired, I decided to give it a shot.

    The piece is actually a clock. Seconds tick off with the rotation of the motor. The globe rotates once per hour and motion is visible with each tick of a second. A third wheel, just inside the equator, rotates once per day to display the hour.
    All the entries:
    http://www.artprize.org/entries

    My entry page:
    http://www.artprize.org/63522

    If you are in Grand Rapids between September 21 and October 9, you might want to have a look, and I would appreciate your vote.






    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

  • #2
    Very interesting indeed, you've my vote.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      SWEET Weston! I'd vote YES!

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      • #4
        Lovely.

        Of the details that jump out from the initial photos, the spiders that act as hubs for the hoops and the 'wrought iron' look of the mount that attaches the 'clock face' to the diameter of the main chassis are two I find particularly attractive.

        The main chassis ring is a built-up piece, yes?

        .

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        • #5
          dang! It's amazing what you can make with a drill and hacksaw, right? Joking aside, that's some beautiful work even if it makes my head hurt looking at it

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          • #6
            Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
            ... The main chassis ring is a built-up piece, yes?
            The big ring or gimbal is a single piece, a flame-cut piece of 3/4" steel. the base plate was the drop from the center of the ring. Those pieces were left in their natural condition, mill scale and oxides and all, with no other surface treatment, as were most of the rest of the parts. The exceptions were the blue parts - those being heated to naturally oxidize to blue.
            Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
            ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
              ... the spiders that act as hubs for the hoops and the 'wrought iron' look of the mount that attaches the 'clock face' to the diameter of the main chassis are two I find particularly attractive...
              The spiders were turned from brass disks and then profiled on the CNC mill. The "wrought iron" detail was machined flat on the CNC, then the arms were brought to red heat with a torch and "wrought" to shape.
              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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              • #8
                Absolutely incredible!
                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                • #9
                  Nice work, Wes. I expected to see a version of the magnetic clock, but you have reverted to common gears. Is it on permanent display or can we expect to see it at NAMES in April? You certainly have been busy since you retired. Bob.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Fisher View Post
                    Nice work, Wes. I expected to see a version of the magnetic clock, but you have reverted to common gears. Is it on permanent display or can we expect to see it at NAMES in April? You certainly have been busy since you retired. Bob.
                    I don't know that I "reverted" to gears, I just got good enough at making them. The motor that drives the clock is of the basic magnetic clock design, but with double coils, 6 instead of 3, for a little extra power.

                    It is listed for sale at ArtPrize. Perhaps some lawyer or businessman will buy it to place in his lobby. If I don't sell it, I will indeed bring it to NAMES.
                    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Beautiful craftsmanship Wes! I looked at a bunch of the other entries. In my mind, yours far exceeds all the ones I saw. I hope you are well rewarded for your efforts.
                      Kansas City area

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                      • #12
                        Very impressive. Wish I was close enough to vote for it.
                        David Kaiser
                        “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
                        ― Robert A. Heinlein

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                        • #13
                          Another view - the gear train.

                          I have to deliver the piece to the venue in a week. The basic structure is done, but I will be adding small refinements.

                          Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                          ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                          • #14
                            That ain't no clock, it's a time machine, which a clock is I suppose, but when you say time machine everyone thinks HG wells, which definitely has the same look, sort of Victorian high tech, brass glass and bling, can't fail to impress the judges, and if it doesn't they need to have thier heads examined for lesions on the brain (a lot more common than I thought apparently)
                            i love a mechanism like that to my name, perhaps one day, we can dream even if they rarely materialise.
                            Any chance of plans one day?
                            Mark

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                            • #15
                              I love it, lets hope the artsy fartsies can appreciate the machine work over some splattered paint.

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