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Bailingwire fix

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  • Bailingwire fix



    Smacked a small deer last night, then noticed R/H headlamp was 'looking' down at the road. This morning unscrewed, removed, backed off, whatever, 23 fasteners of all sorts to remove the sealed, fancy, projector type headlamp module. Appeared the vertical adjustment system had become compromised and a complete headlamp module would be required from Ford at 455 bucks versus 234 for aftermarket module from Rock Auto.

    A 1/8 in. dia. hole was drilled in the backside of the module case, then a 1/16 inch dia. target starter hole in the top of the hinged frame which mounts the projector eye and the conventional reflector. A long deck screw was installed, facilitating the vertical adjustment of the headlamp aim. There is no horizontal aim requirement.

    Several wraps of bailing wire around the deck screw make for a fine, final adjustment.

  • #2
    Good fix. I've seen some weird combos holding parts on after deer or moose collissions.Lol

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    • #3
      You have to be old enough to know that Hay and Straw bales were rectangular and tied with wire before your fix makes sense. Today most bales are large cylinders wrapped with plastic sheet.

      Had a little "oopsie' with the wife's Jetta resulting in some body panels flapping in the wind. Stopped at Walmart and asked for "Automotive Duct tape", the clerk did not hesitate or question. He just handed us a roll. It was pretty embarrassing driving the 100 miles home with the front end sheet metal held together by 2 rolls of duct tape.

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      • #4
        FWIW, a near enough substitute for hay wire/baling wire is rebar tie wire. Soft iron wire about 16 guage, available at your local building centre in 1 lb rolls. If you want to get fancy, it is available in coated and bare versions. The bare versions often have a lot of oily residue from the manufacturing process.
        Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Stepside View Post
          You have to be old enough to know that Hay and Straw bales were rectangular and tied with wire before your fix makes sense. Today most bales are large cylinders wrapped with plastic sheet.

          Had a little "oopsie' with the wife's Jetta resulting in some body panels flapping in the wind. Stopped at Walmart and asked for "Automotive Duct tape", the clerk did not hesitate or question. He just handed us a roll. It was pretty embarrassing driving the 100 miles home with the front end sheet metal held together by 2 rolls of duct tape.
          If you'd bought the camouflaged tape, no-one would have seen it last time I mentioned a baling wire fix to someone they had no idea what I was talking about.

          Edit:
          I keep a coil of camdigger's rebar wire in my truck tool box all the time.

          And his sig reminds me of a job site I was on where one of the measurements was marked 'hammer fit', but that was just a weird job site where all elevations were marked from sea level.
          Last edited by kendall; 10-01-2016, 04:03 PM.

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          • #6
            When I was a kid it was called Haywire. Most older cars were held together with --Spit and Haywire--If somebody had a mental breakdown, they were said to have gone Haywire. If you were fixing anything mechanical and it all flew apart, it was said to have gone Haywire.---Haywire was just one of those multi-use words 60 years ago!!!
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #7
              Very true Brian, I been classed as HAYWIRE myself a few times!! LOL!!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Stepside View Post
                Today most bales are large cylinders wrapped with plastic sheet.
                Those hay bales should be outlawed - the animals can't get a square meal.

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                • #9
                  Brian
                  Thanks for reminding me of the term "Haywire" only to be followed with "Going Gunny Sack". This is when stupidity overrides common sense, usually in concert with "mind enhancing" substances.

                  When Haywire was available, it was the fix for broken tire chains during the winter months. Now like others there is a roll of tie wire in my toolbox.

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                  • #10
                    I keep a couple of rolls of electric fence wire around for fixes and paint hangers. That's about as rare as bailing wire since they went to that ribbon stuff for electric fences. Some Gurl must have come up with that idea.

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                    • #11
                      Reminds me of a line in a song "my daddy is gonna straighten you out like a piece of wire"
                      When is the last time any one straightened and reused wire?

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                      • #12
                        I'm not a farmer or rancher, but having lived in a small town in Iowa for some years, I believe I saw some good, old fashioned, rectangular hay bales. I did not examine them closely, but I am sure they were wrapped with wire; baling wire, that is. I would bet that places like Orschlen or Tractor Supply still sell it.

                        Here you go:

                        https://www.shopping.net/shopping?q=...rpSearchTopBox

                        Of course, for us city boys there's always coat hanger wire. And it is free.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Stepside View Post
                          ...Today most bales are large cylinders wrapped with plastic sheet...
                          The round bales wrapped with plastic are actually "haylage" with a moisture content closer to that of silage. Unwrapped round bales are dry hay. And square bales are far from obsolete--millions and millions are still made every year...
                          Keith
                          __________________________
                          Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                          • #14
                            I don't know about grass hay, but I've occasionally bought bales (rectangular) of wheat straw and it's always tied with polypropylene cord ...usually orange, but sometimes black.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                              I don't know about grass hay, but I've occasionally bought bales (rectangular) of wheat straw and it's always tied with polypropylene cord ...usually orange, but sometimes black.
                              When I was a kid we had 3 or 4 hay bales in the back yard. We used them (stacked) as a backstop for our archery practice. I have no idea what kind of "hay" it was, but it was interesting for a 12 year old to bury a "field point" arrow 6 inches (or more!) deep into the heart of the target. For comparison, the hay was dense enough to stop a .22 bullet. Stabbing it with an arrow by hand seldom went more than a few inches.

                              This worked even when we moved from the country to the Chicago suburbs. We were the envy of the neighborhood boys.

                              Dan
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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