Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Baileigh PL-1022VS lathe missing parts - thoughts on how to proceed?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Baileigh PL-1022VS lathe missing parts - thoughts on how to proceed?

    Greetings

    I picked up a used 10x22 baileigh lathe from craigslist for $200. Seemed like the deal of the century until I get home and discover it should have come with more change gears, a 4 jaw chuck, face plate, & steady rest. I've reached out to the seller to search his shop & offered more $ - no response so far.

    I called up Baileigh replacement costs are steep:

    chuck $150
    gears $450 ouch!
    Face plate $100

    This is my first foray into machine tools - I also picked up a small grizzly G0704 mill at the same time (also $200) - fortunately the mill seems to be complete save for 1 table wheel.

    Seeking the collective wisdom - should I pay the piper on replacement parts? Sell the lathe and keep looking? Make my own gears (will need cutter, dividing head etc. estimate >$600) Alternate sources for gears? (Grizzly has change gears from $12 -$20 each for similar sized lathe, unknown if same pitch).

    Intended use for these machines is to augment my hobby welding projects - generally things for my tractor or metal art. Planned projects include grapple for my tractor, a new welding cart, etc.

    Appreciate any and all help!

  • #2
    Sounds like a great deal if the lathe is in good condition. I wouldn't sell it just because of the missing parts. You might not use them anyway. Get them if/when you need them.

    Comment


    • #3
      Depending on how many gears you need those prices sound pretty reasonable.
      Mike
      Central Ohio, USA

      Comment


      • #4
        It probably came with those parts, but people loose stuff all the time. Or maybe he kept them for another machine he had, who knows.

        Just looked the lathe up, amazon has it for $2k. If you really need the extra stuff, just save up and buy it. Depending what threads it can already cut, you may not even need the gears. I would get a 4 jaw chuck, but you won't need a faceplate right away.

        Also, find out what spindle mount it has, and maybe you can find a different 4 jaw/faceplate elsewhere.

        Comment


        • #5
          If you don't plan on doing threading (or using tap/die to do it instead), you can make do without the change gears, as long as there are some on the lathe now to be able to drive the lead screw/power feed. You can't set the speed of them as much, but you should still be able to get a usable setting.

          The faceplate and the 4-jaw chuck, that depends on the parts you want to make.

          As to whether you should dump it and look for another lathe, it depends on the condition of the lathe itself and how likely you think another similarly sized/priced lathe is going to show up in your area that includes the missing parts.

          Comment


          • #6
            I would be willing to bet that it is a Grizzly 10x22 clone, there are actually quiet a large number of various 10x22 metal lathes out there that all seem to be very similar. Do a search on Grizzly's site for info on their version, (owner parts manuals) as well as your lathe to compare specs, lead screw pitch etc., I'll bet they are the same.

            Chuck with backing plate aren't priced too bad, face plate is not bad either but change gears are strictly Hollywood prices, I'm sure with a bit of research you can do much better.

            Keep trying to contact the seller though, that stuff has got to be somewhere and is no good to him.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking up that lathe indicates that it's a fairly new machine with a quick change box. And given that you live in the US I'm going to guess that the gearing under the end cover is set up for SAE threading. If you are missing gearing it would likely be the ones needed to perform metric threading.

              So start by opening up the end cover and see what gearing is inside already. Then compare what you have to the lathe manual or any configuration plates on the cover to see what the lathe is set up for cutting at the moment. You might just have enough to do the SAE share of the threads and just not bother with metric threading.

              Besides 99% of threading done in the lathe can be done using holders that are guided by a shaft stub in the tail stock. Using the tail stock and suitable die and tap holders provides you with "good enough" axial centering for all but the most demanding of needs. And even then there's a trick or two you can use to aid in making such tools cut even more axially true. So if you are set up for at present for cutting SAE threads then I would just let it go at that and not worry about the missing gears too much.

              The 4 jaw chuck at $150 is actually a great deal if it comes with the correct back plate on it already. A quick look at Grizzly.com shows that an 8" plain back 4 jaw is up around $120. And then you still need a back plate. Either a machine your own $60 blank or which ever ready to use option is needed. A simple 8" threaded plate being $90. So if they are willing to sell you a ready to use 4 jaw chuck with proper mount at $150 I'd call them back RIGHT NOW! I'd rather have an 8 inch 4 jaw for your size of lathe but if they are offering a 6" at that $150 price point and with the proper mount then that is still a great deal.

              The information about this lathe I can find online does not indicate what sort of chuck mount is in use. But depending on what method it uses you could make it a project to machine your own faceplate. But just know that an 8 inch blank hunk o' cast iron to use for such a job is still $60 plus any shipping cost for a rather heavy hunk of metal. So $100 for the ready to use faceplate is not a bad price at all. If you really MUST have it NOW then I'd say suck it up and buy these two items. Otherwise shop around for a while and see what turns up.

              At any rate you clearly got one helluva deal on that lathe and on that mill.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • #8
                Uhm... Make your own?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                  Looking up that lathe indicates that it's a fairly new machine with a quick change box. And given that you live in the US I'm going to guess that the gearing under the end cover is set up for SAE threading. If you are missing gearing it would likely be the ones needed to perform metric threading.
                  This lathe does not have a quick change gear box. It is simply a variable speed version of the Grizzly 10x22, I believe Grizzly has a variable speed version as well, as do others.
                  Threading is set up for imperial threads due to the imperial lead screw, meaning you do not have to leave the half nuts engaged as when metric threading.

                  What many perceive to be a quick change gear box is simply a quick change feed rate gear box. This is also used to change thread options after the external threading gears have been changed.

                  Chuck mount is probably 1-3/4" x 8 TPI.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Willy, I saw the three dials sitting on what would otherwise be a quick change box and leaped to what I thought was the proper conclusion.

                    So the gears inside the end cover set the pitch for a range of related threads then the three knobs double, triple, etc the rate to get multiples of the basic pitch? Like set up gearing for 8TPI then the knobs let you cut 16, 24, 32, 40 and 48?

                    Chuck mount is probably 1-3/4" x 8 TPI.
                    Which is one size I did not see in the listing for threaded back plates at Griz.

                    BTW, I love your sig line. So true... so true....

                    EDIT- Looking closer at the Baileigh and Grizzly 10x22's there's a number of significant differences in the bed casting, tail stock castings and the labeling on the controls. I don't think there's much in common after all.
                    Last edited by BCRider; 10-05-2016, 03:09 PM.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                      EDIT- Looking closer at the Baileigh and Grizzly 10x22's there's a number of significant differences in the bed casting, tail stock castings and the labeling on the controls. I don't think there's much in common after all.
                      There are a number of different factories in China producing this same basic design, and yes, as you noted they are not identical, but obviously from the same mother.
                      Although I haven't got the time at the moment to do an extensive search, it would be time well spent to get more detailed information on the Baileigh lathe. Unless I missed it no owners manual was available from their support page???

                      I'll try to have a look later today or tomorrow when I'm not so busy.

                      Yeah the sig line, not mine and I can't locate the exact origin as there seem to be a number of conflicting sources as to from who it belongs to.
                      Irregardless it does address the painful lessons earned on the road to wisdom.
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Chuck mount is probably 1-3/4" x 8 TPI.




                        Which is one size I did not see in the listing for threaded back plates at Griz.
                        Yes strange indeed, because that is what the Grizzly 10x22 lathes use. However there are a number of sources for these, or heaven forbid one could probably buy a blank and make their own. That is if they have the required change gears. LOL
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          dang, you got a deal there! People around here want $500 for an old HF X1 mill without tooling.

                          As for the missing stuff, buy it as and when you need it. I would prioritise the 4 jaw chuck first and then worry about the other stuff later. As others have said, this lathe is made for and sold by several different outlets in the US and most likely you'll be able to pick up what you need easily enough. Grizzly's prices are pretty reasonable.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Really appreciate the helpful replies.

                            Baileigh sent me an owners manual in PDF. The chuck mounts on three studs. I've attached some pictures. The specifications do not indicate a threaded spindle rather a MT 4.

                            I measure the Lead screw at 8 TPI over 4". The change gears appear to be metric with a MOD of 1.5. The keyed bore is 14mm and the inner bore 10mm.

                            Inch calculations would be a diametric pitch of near 17 which is weird size.

                            Hmm having trouble attaching a picture from my iPad. Below is link to some pix and the owners manual in PDF on my google drive

                            https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/f...ERpN3JvLUhqNUU
                            Last edited by hazmat; 10-05-2016, 09:18 PM. Reason: adding pictures

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you have more time than money and need a gear or two, then you can cut them on the lathe without a dividing head. The keyway can also be cut on the lathe, but it's going to be hard on the machine as it's a small lathe. The video below shows one method of cutting gears on a lathe.

                              There is also a book in the Workshop Practice series called "Dividing" which shows you how to divide without a commercial dividing head.

                              The chuck mount you have can be bumped into position to give you better alignment, just like a set-true chuck. More fiddly, but I have seen Stefan G do it in a video. He keeps the studs a little loose and taps it until the indicator needle stops moving. There are other reasons for getting a four-jaw, but if concentricity is your only concern, then the three-jaw might be enough.



                              Optimum sells a lathe that appears to have an identical headstock to yours. This one has a metric lead screw. If they sell the inch version of this lathe in the US, then you might be able to get gears off them for less.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X