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Threading problem on 9X 20 lathee

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  • #16
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Well it's water under the bridge... My point is that theres better lathes that cost less than can be bought brand new, IE... The 8x12/14 lathes by HF and Lathemaster. I have an 8x14 from LatheMaster, and my SB 9c is nothing special to write home about... I would like to get a bigger lathe, preferably CNC. I used to own an Enco 9x20 lathe, I do not remember it having a powered cross feed.
    Then why didn't you post that info in the first place and leave it at that, as opposed to your previous posting which contributed absolutely nothing useful, beyond identifying you (again) as an ass.
    Location: North Central Texas

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Joel View Post
      Then why didn't you post that info in the first place and leave it at that, as opposed to your previous posting which contributed absolutely nothing useful, beyond identifying you (again) as an ass.
      Please give RB a break. His second post was quite civil and on topic. No need to start a fight.

      Dan
      P.S. I'd love to have a larger, better lathe, but no room for it. To make room for a tool room sized lathe I'd have to remove two of my wife's storage racks, and that's just not going to happen. The 9x20 does the job, and the 7x12 works for second ops, so that's what I have.
      Last edited by danlb; 10-07-2016, 12:05 AM.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #18
        There's a mechanical interlock to prevent closing the half nut when the carriage or cross feeds are engaged. Some machininghave a narrow "gate" for this interlock to clear. Make sure your feed levers on the apron are open,neutral, ect.

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        • #19
          It's not unusual for the half nuts to strip, they engage OK but since there is no thread left, nothing happens.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Forrest Addy View Post
            There's a mechanical interlock to prevent closing the half nut when the carriage or cross feeds are engaged. Some machininghave a narrow "gate" for this interlock to clear. Make sure your feed levers on the apron are open,neutral, ect.
            Not every machine has that. There is no interlock on a Logan between turning feed and crossfeed, for instance, and the Logan is not a minimum cost machine. I don't know if any interlock exists between turning and threading feed on the "automatic apron" versions, as I do not have one, but I would assume so.

            If the 920 has an interlock, it must be the "joint plate".
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Joel View Post
              Then why didn't you post that info in the first place and leave it at that, as opposed to your previous posting which contributed absolutely nothing useful, beyond identifying you (again) as an ass.
              Because I was in a rotten mood, couldn't commute home to Florida due to the Hurricane, and if I somehow managed to get home, getting out to start my new job might of been dicey, so... I am in Detroit for quite a while as I conduct my training which will prevent me from seeing my wife, and children for quite some time.
              Of course the stupid storm was over exaggerated and I could made it home easily and and back again... What ever, so I took out my frustrations in one of two of my favorite ways. Calling small Chinese lathes boat anchors, or posting an idea that bicyclists would find to be in poor taste.

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              • #22
                First off, I din't intend to start the everlasting argument about American iron vs Chinese. My Jet is an older model, made in Taiwan and a quite well finished machine. It also has a Dorian QGTH and good quality chucks, read Buck and Craftsman. I also own a 1945 Logan and a Unimat,so I know my way around a lathe. The feed lever is not engaged and the threading lever does not want to move at all. I kind of resent my lathe being called an anchor, it is a way better machine than the Craftsman 6X 18 that it replaced. So much for American iron as far as I'm concerned. Bob.

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                • #23
                  I don't LIKE the 9 x 20 machines, from what little I have as experience, but they are certainly capable of being used. I don't LIKE everything about the Logan either, but it was a good size, good price, and available. I've modified it a fair bit for better performance and usability.

                  I would NOT classify the 6 x 18 as "good old 'murrican iron". It is, in some ways, lighter built than the 109/AA machines, and has never looked to me like a good investment. It's virtues are availability and lowish cost, as well as being overall a tad above the 109, as it has real back gears (quiet), and sensible feed design, both lacking in the 109. The folks I know who have had one, quickly decided to buy something bigger and heavier built.

                  Originally posted by Bob Fisher View Post
                  .......The feed lever is not engaged and the threading lever does not want to move at all. ...
                  Check to see that the "joint plate" and the "control block" are not stuck in the "lockout" position, assuming they DO form the lockout.

                  See if any swarf can possibly have gotten in to block movement.

                  Nothing in there is that complex, although there are a bunch of springs etc involved with the "control block". Should be reasonably obvious, although it may not be visible when it is all assembled.

                  I think a mirror could be used to check, looks like there is room. You may end up pulling off the apron if you can't see any issues, and it does not get solved by any other means applied externally (blow off with air, brush off, add oil, etc).
                  Last edited by J Tiers; 10-07-2016, 05:00 PM.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #24
                    Thanks to all who have added constructive comments. Especially J T, I shall try those first chance and get back with the results.Bob.

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                    • #25
                      Bob, I think JT is on the right track. You being most familiar with this machine will have to ask yourself, is there a subtle difference in "feel" when engaging the threading lever? It has to feel somewhat different from when it was functional, stickiness, gritty feeling, short travel, something along those lines. Did this happen suddenly or has this been creeping up slowly?
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post
                        Bob, I think JT is on the right track. You being most familiar with this machine will have to ask yourself, is there a subtle difference in "feel" when engaging the threading lever? It has to feel somewhat different from when it was functional, stickiness, gritty feeling, short travel, something along those lines. Did this happen suddenly or has this been creeping up slowly?
                        Willy, it wasn't a gradual thing, does't move at all. Like it's rusted in place. Guess I will have to pull the apron, can't see anything with a mirror. Bob.

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