Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

need information on camel backs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • need information on camel backs

    I started to steal someone thread and figured I better start my own.

    On a camelback, how is the keyed shaft connected to the morse socket?

    The shaft was bent above the bevel gear from the fire. I heated it up and straightened what I could. Then cut the excess off as close to gear as possible. It is still tight getting it through the gear. If I could send it the other direction I would be pushing the bent part away from the gear.

    But while I am looking at it I can't imagine they would have manufactured the shaft, quill and morse socket as one unit. Way too much machining.
    I cannot see any sign of it being two pieces but I would think it should be two parts.

    My other option is to cobble up a mag drill on top of the bearing supports and drill the shaft out of the gear.

    I will buy some keyed shafting and invent a way to connect it to the socket.

  • #2
    Not sure what you mean by "quill".

    Usually, the socket, the long shaft of the spindle, and the spline (or key drive) are indeed one piece. Maybe on some the socket is shrunk on to save metal, but either I have not seen one, or else it looked like one piece.

    Many old drill presses have the JT taper as part of the spindle (a construction I do not particularly like), and for best concentricity, it makes sense to have all that one piece, either socket or taper.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

    Comment


    • #3
      One hump or two.
      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

      Comment


      • #4
        On my circa-1909 Rockford, it certainly appears as though the spindle is one piece. From the Morse socket to the tip of the splined drive rod, near as I can see it's all one unit.

        And that, of course, rides inside a cast iron quill. The portion inside the quill is only a little bit larger in diameter- by maybe 1/8" to 3/16"- than the splined drive rod.

        Keep in mind that back then, making the part from a forging didn't cost that much more than having to turn it from a solid, but was less wasteful of expensive material. Although the largest portion of my spindle is perhaps 3", so I could easily see it being turned from solid bar of the day.

        I suppose it's possible the nose flange was forge-welded or interference-pressed into place, but I really kind of doubt that's what they did. I'm fairly certain it's a single piece.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
          On my circa-1909 Rockford, it certainly appears as though the spindle is one piece. From the Morse socket to the tip of the splined drive rod, near as I can see it's all one unit.

          And that, of course, rides inside a cast iron quill. The portion inside the quill is only a little bit larger in diameter- by maybe 1/8" to 3/16"- than the splined drive rod.

          Keep in mind that back then, making the part from a forging didn't cost that much more than having to turn it from a solid, but was less wasteful of expensive material. Although the largest portion of my spindle is perhaps 3", so I could easily see it being turned from solid bar of the day.

          I suppose it's possible the nose flange was forge-welded or interference-pressed into place, but I really kind of doubt that's what they did. I'm fairly certain it's a single piece.

          Doc.
          I am afraid you are right.
          I had no choice but cut the keyed shaft. my plan is to get it apart and clean it. Then buy some keyed shafting and splice it by cutting a male taper on one piece and a female on the other. fit them, then cross drill for a couple of pins,
          Hopefully I can do this beyond where the keyway ends so I don't have to deal with aligning keyways.
          I am open to opinions and options.

          Comment


          • #6
            Or, possibly, if you have the capability to cut the tapers, you might just cut a spigot and a mating hole with a "V" between on the OD. Then weld the two and turn down, as Sir John is fond of doing with motors.

            Yes, you might have some warping, but if the added part is a bit on the large side, it can be cut to diameter to straighten it. That assumes you can also cut the keyway. I assume you have use of a shop you can do the work at for the moment.

            I like the weld better, because it is more metal holding the shaft, it is all at the OD where it is the most effective, and it is a solid connection with strength in all directions. The pin is too much like a shear pin, and is also at a small diameter, where it torque is multiplied. A camelback is just too useful as a drill for large holes to limit it like that if you can avoid doing that in any way.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

            Comment


            • #7
              I will have to look closer at Sir John.
              There is one nice thing about having no shop. I get to visit friends with shops a lot more.
              I figure if I hang around enough he will sell me his extra lathe at my price, just to keep me away.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                ....

                But while I am looking at it I can't imagine they would have manufactured the shaft, quill and morse socket as one unit. Way too much machining.
                ...
                Consider it may have been a forging, made more to net shape,
                but turning a good lot of stock into chips is what machining is about.
                Making a profit was easier back in the day.

                -Doozer
                DZER

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm no expert on these, but seen your question on my thread, so I'll put in my $0.02. I'm with the others in that the spindle is probably one piece. I'm assuming that you have already cut this and still cannot get the spindle to drop through the drive gear. Have you removed the feed handle and pinion gear? If so can you move the whole quill assy up enough to remove a bit more of the spindle or at least grind the high spots off?

                  lg
                  no neat sig line
                  near Salem OR

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mine is the larger version the entire feed mechanism rides on a dovetail on the column. So the keyed shaft was much longer than the smaller ones. The bevel gear is seven feet from the ground and the keyed shaft extended two feet above that. Yes the feed handle and rack are out.
                    Unfortunately the shaft was all the way up when it bent, no room at all to go up.
                    I drove it down through the gear about inch and half but it is extremely tight.
                    I think I have enough to cut the shaft below the gear. Then take it to the press and push it out the other direction.
                    I just want to be sure I have enough material left to marry to a new keyed shaft.
                    Working while standing on the drill table and a ladder is a real pain.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X