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  • Fire in and and recall of Samsung Galaxy Note7 mobilephones

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=s...-BApIQ_AUIBigB

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=g...ile+phone+fire

    Has anyone had the fire/s in and recall/s of Samsung Galaxy Note7 affect them?

    What is/was their solution/s - or wasn't there one/any?

    Has it affected any or all other Android phones/devices?

    I consider this to NOT be "OT" as many use their mobile phones in many ways for work in and related to their shop.

    It didn't affect me as I have an Apple6s smart phone and it works very well and is very well supported by Apple and my supplier.
    Last edited by oldtiffie; 10-12-2016, 08:57 PM.

  • #2
    The problem is that specific device. And it doesn't seem to be just the battery, as the replacements are also catching on fire. Some have speculated that it is because the battery is getting squished a bit that is causing some of them to fail, but this is difficult to determine as the battery is glued to the inside of the phone, and then the shell of the phone is glued together. And it's not charging-related, as several phones have combusted while disconnected (one was just on a nightstand, burned while the person was sleeping, another on a plane, person was trying to turn it off and then it burned [not sure if it was in progress or was turned off]).

    They also tried, using software, to reduce the current going to the battery while charging, but that did not eliminate the problem (they tried it before the first recall, as a way to make the phone "safe" until it could be replaced).

    Comment


    • #3
      And how does/did having the phone pretty well "self ignite/destroy" and/or have it recalled by Samsung affect any users here? Or others too?

      What of the loss of data on the phone as well as not having the phone for an extended period - or at all - and is there any way or chance that Samsung will re-install your data to a new phone - providing they make or can or will supply a similar phone for your use?

      And if a replacement phone was provided in a reasonable time - just how confident in or of it would you be?

      As near as I can see many providers left Apple and went to Samsung based on performance and a lesser price than the Apple iPhone.

      If so it seems that was at least an unfortunate choice.

      How many would have had insurance to cover this loss in full or in part?

      Comment


      • #4
        I didn't buy one, but I received a couple of emails from shipitto stating that they weren't accepting returns from their customers. They said that the phones cannot be sent by air (understandable), so they couldn't return them to the US. I doubt that Samsung Australia is replacing phones that were bought from the US.

        I don't know if there was anything that they could have reasonably done, but the email came across badly to me. They probably have no legal obligation to help their customers in this situation, but it didn't look like they cared. There will be some unhappy customers that will think twice before using their service again.

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        • #5
          Re: Samsung Galaxy Note7 smart phones - recent "catching fire" problem/s.

          Thanks pinstripe.

          My supplier - Telstra - seemed to advertise pretty well all Samsung i-phones to pretty well the exclusion of Apple iPhones but Telstra are still supplying very good survive to me at least and I presume all their other Apple clients/customers in Australia.

          I have the new Apple/ANZ "tap and go" facility on my phone and Apple has advised that I can down-load the new iPhone operating system (OS) - - without needing to buy new iPhone. I will get Telstra to do the work as well as installing a couple of new applications (aka "Apps) - for free.

          Many - for a variety or reasons - real and perceived - regard Telstra as being really "on the nose" with a lot of people but all that I can say is that their service has been - and continues to be - first class.

          The Telstra shop is in the main street in the town near where we live (about 5 kM - say 3 miles) and we are in the shops pretty well every day - so its has worked out well for us.

          Some Samsung android apps seem to be able to be installed on Apple iPhones as well - but can the data on the Samsung apps on Samsung phones be transferred/copied etc. to the Apple iPhones?

          Does Samsung have iPhones that still work OK and are serviced by Samsung? If that is/was so then those owners of those android phones etc. may have come through this OK.

          Any advice will be appreciated.
          Last edited by oldtiffie; 10-13-2016, 07:34 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
            ...
            Does Samsung have iPhones that still work OK and are serviced by Samsung? If that is/was so then those owners of those android phones etc. may have come through this OK.
            ...
            Two family members have the Samsung Galaxy S6, and one has the Samsung Galaxy S5: all three continue to function correctly.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
              Re: Samsung Galaxy Note7 smart phones - recent "catching fire" problem/s.

              Thanks pinstripe.

              My supplier - Telstra - seemed to advertise pretty well all Samsung i-phones to pretty well the exclusion of Apple iPhones but Telstra are still supplying very good survive to me at least and I presume all their other Apple clients/customers in Australia.
              Samsung does not make iPhones, or i-phones... Do you mean smart phones? iPhone is Apple, and as such, designed properly.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the "catch" RB211 - it was silly of me to have it happen.

                I note that Samsung is recalling all their Galaxy Note7 smart phones and so far as I recall they are not to "re-work" them and re-distributing them.

                I guess that all current Galaxy Note 7 owners have limited recourse or certainty.

                It must be a worry.

                I realise that - so far - the problems relate to very few of the vast number that seem to be continuing to work correctly - so thus far it seems that the risk are few or minimal.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
                  Thanks for the "catch" RB211 - it was silly of me to have it happen.

                  I note that Samsung is recalling all their Galaxy Note7 smart phones and so far as I recall they are not to "re-work" them and re-distributing them.

                  I guess that all current Galaxy Note 7 owners have limited recourse or certainty.

                  It must be a worry.

                  I realise that - so far - the problems relate to very few of the vast number that seem to be continuing to work correctly - so thus far it seems that the risk are few or minimal.
                  Well, from my point of view as an airline pilot, well cargo pilot now, they should be treated as a potential hazard, if not on the airplane, then inside your house. I would think Samsung would refund or replace with a different model phone.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think the count is up around 100 Galaxy Note 7 phones that have self destructed. Out of 2.5 million, that's not a bad failure rate statistically but the pyrotechnic phones/batteries can't be identified. They either go up in smoke or they don't. Samsung has ceased production of the Note 7 so no replacements will be offered. You either take the refund or keep it. Samsung is well into the production of the next version anyway. Perhaps "Galaxy S8" that is rumored to be out in March 2017? Don't bet on it now until the production problems with batteries are solved. As reported by news media, many owners of working phones are keeping the S7. They are that good. I was about to buy one myself until the fire storm hit the air.

                    The aftermarket accessory companies must be taking a bit of a hit too.
                    Last edited by CCWKen; 10-13-2016, 10:01 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I might mention that in my search for an alternative to the S7, it seems many "refurbished" S6s are hitting the market. Amazon is gearing up for re-sales of the S6.

                      And no, I won't even consider an iPhone or a Google phone. iPhones won't sync to anything unless plugged in and Google phones... Well, it's Google. I hate Google's business practices.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How it seems it is to be in Australia anyway:

                        http://www.samsung.com/au/galaxynote7-notice/
                        Last edited by oldtiffie; 10-13-2016, 11:29 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                          Well, from my point of view as an airline pilot, well cargo pilot now, they should be treated as a potential hazard, if not on the airplane, then inside your house. I would think Samsung would refund or replace with a different model phone.
                          It's my understanding that Samsung is refunding the money for all Note 7 phones, full price. Depending on where you are, they may even be offering additional money for you to buy another, different Samsung phone.

                          I would say anyone keeping one of these phones instead of returning it for a full refund is, well, stupid. The phone has been shown to burst into flame at any time, with no warning, whether or not the phone is being charged or not, at a rate far higher than other phones, and Samsung still doesn't know the cause.

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                          • #14
                            I think the count is up around 100 Galaxy Note 7 phones that have self destructed. Out of 2.5 million, that's not a bad failure rate statistically but the pyrotechnic phones/batteries can't be identified.
                            I would be interested how many of those hundretsomething where charged with a cheapass-aftermarket-charger.
                            Personal website

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                            • #15
                              I don't have a "smart phone", and my LG306G with $8/month TracFone service is really all I need or want. I have several laptop computers and a WinBook tablet for anything other than mobile phone calls and occasional text.

                              As for problems caused by cheap aftermarket chargers, I would think the phones would be designed so as to prevent any problems other than extreme conditions. Cheap chargers might have lower capacity or poor regulation, but I doubt they would have enough voltage or current to cause damage, and the phone should just refuse to charge and indicate an improper charger.
                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

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