Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tool or machine to cut moss efficiently?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    How about one of these?


    Take off the wheels and the handles. Motorize and mount the mechanism on blocks on your bench so that you can fill a try with your moss and slide it under to be nicely clipped.

    Incidently, although this type of machine is recognised as a lawn mower they were originally developed for clipping fabric.

    Leave a comment:


  • MossBoss
    replied
    bump

    Leave a comment:


  • MossBoss
    replied
    Hello again. Thank you for all the suggestions. Here's an update on the lichen project. I started with EddyCurr's idea with the rotary cutter and self-healing mat. The process was indeed more efficient but after a while I still felt like I haven't reached the best solution for the cutting process.

    @Moxiedad2001 - yes you are absolutely right. These are lichen's, not moss and educated myself on them after reading your post. Very much appreciated.

    @JRouche - What's the name of the tool and where can I buy one?

    Furthermore, if anyone is willing to build something for me, similar to what EddieCurr suggested using sheet metal for the blade to cut the bottom portion of the lichen, and using a frame to hold the moss, I would be willing to pay you for your services and materials. I will provide the lichen for you.

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • kitno455
    replied
    Build your art backwards. Place the pretty side of the moss downward into a shallow tray of water, and freeze it. Scrape the backside flat, thaw and drain water, while leaving moss in tray. Coat your backer board in glue, and drop it on the back of the moss.

    allan

    Leave a comment:


  • Baz
    replied
    AS mentioned by Moxie it seems to be lichen, possibly the rubberised lichen sold for railway modellers in HO scale to simulate bushes. One way to make it firmer and easier to cut by some methods is to freeze it though too low a temperature might make it all shatter. Experiment worthwhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Works for animal moss, might work for veg moss?? JR


    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by MrSleepy View Post
    I have a similar issue with my car , moss from the trees gets into the cars seams,openings etc and its spread by the very act of cleaning it off.
    Your car ?



    .

    Leave a comment:


  • MrSleepy
    replied
    Originally posted by macona View Post
    Waterjet
    A good way to transplant moss onto bricks ,walls etc for ageing.. is to put it in a blender and blitz it for a few minutes,then paint it onto the stone. It grows back really well . Imagine that in an expensive waterjet. .

    I have a similar issue with my car , moss from the trees gets into the cars seams,openings etc and its spread by the very act of cleaning it off. Even when using strong bleach or iron based moss killer , the damn stuff still returns.
    Last edited by MrSleepy; 10-15-2016, 03:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    How resilient is the moss? Meaning if you stuff a bunch of them with the part to be cut off into a bottom plate with holes and then cover the top of the moss with a holding plate will it ruin the moss? Because if not then do that and get yourself some cheese graters and push the frame across the graters.

    Not to be a snob but people actually buy them as art objects! No accounting for taste I guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • macona
    replied
    Waterjet

    Leave a comment:


  • Toolguy
    replied
    Harbor Freight sells a miniature chop saw that should work nicely for this. You could make up an end stop and maybe a support piece for the stalk next to the blade. Although you would still be doing one at a time, it would be cheap, fast and easy to get exact lengths.

    Leave a comment:


  • kendall
    replied
    For slicing the roots off, I believe the deli slicer John H. mentioned would be most effective from from a 'production' standpoint.

    Be careful where you collect the moss, many national and state parks/forests etc as well as cities have serious fines for things even as trivial seeming as picking up rocks, driftwood, and plants on public property.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Moxiedad2001, can lichen be presented in a framed wall hanging as a living organism?

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • Moxiedad2001
    replied
    Neither here nor there about your question . . . but you should know that you are working with lichen, not moss, and the difference is far from trivial. It probably makes no difference to you or your customers, but you really ought to know if this is what you do for a living.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    HMMMM - that's allot of work for something that resembles a carpet sample.

    kinds looks like a medium loop berber to me...

    if it's not a carpet sample I think it should be - maybe you can sell that pattern and color combo because its really quite stunning... suitable for framing id say.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X