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Wire mesh basket for burning pellets in woodstove (Pelleteer)?

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  • Wire mesh basket for burning pellets in woodstove (Pelleteer)?

    I am planning to get some compressed wood bricks for my woodstove, as I did last year and before, and they are available at Tractor Supply for $3.49 for 20 pound packs. They also sell 40 pound bags of wood pellets for $5.19, so I was wondering if they can be burned in my woodstove.

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/sea...%20fuel%20pack

    Upon researching this, I found a product called a "Pelleteer":

    https://www.thepelleteer.com/front_loading.html



    Prices range from $110 to $130, plus $10 shipping. But it seems that something similar could be fabricated easily enough. It could probably be made from a 24" square of expanded steel, although possibly stainless steel might last longer. I found some at McMaster-Carr for something like $30-$50.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#expanded-metal/=14m48y4

    I'm not sure what opening size and thickness would be appropriate. The picture looks like the openings might be about 1/4" x 1/2", and metal perhaps about 1/16" to 1/8". Some possible candidates:

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9302t618/=14m7wif: Raised steel mesh, 1008: 0.38" x 0.94", 0.06" metal, $30.12

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9302t619/=14m7ysj: Raised steel mesh, 1008, 0.31" x 0.94", 0.09" metal, $32.26

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9303t92/=14m7zqi: Raised mesh SS, 304, 0.44" x 0.94", 0.06" metal, $62.48

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9302t636/=14m81eo: Flattened mesh steel, 1008, 0.31" x 1.00", 0.06" metal, $28.62

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9303t77/=14m83i0: Flattened mesh SS 304, 0.63" x 1.75", 0.07" metal, $62.89

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#1337t95/=14m85i0: Flattened mesh SS 316, 0.63" x 1.75", 0.07" metal, $49.94

    Another possible material is perforated metal:

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9358t46/=14m88xa: SS 304, 18 gauge, 0.048", 0.1875" holes. 51% open, $57.09

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#9255t785/=14m8b7k: Steel 18 gauge, 0.048", 0.1875" holes, 51% open, $30.19

    Home Depot has 24" x 24" x 1/8" steel mesh for $20, but hole size and gauge are not specified:
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-...1427/204225784

    Has anyone tried burning pellets in a woodstove?

    Some discussion:
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/w...-stove.105617/
    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

    Paul: www.peschoen.com
    P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
    and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

  • #2
    Usually, pellet stoves have a hopper and a small screw conveyor to slowly feed the burner. I can't imagine the effect of dumping a lot of pellets in the stove at once.
    You could try to press the pellets into a bigger log and use this way. Maybe you could experiment mixing with some recycled paper pulp in the log forming process. A tube with a slight taper for demoulding and a 20 ton bottle jack should do the trick.
    Helder Ferreira
    SetŮ’bal, Portugal

    Comment


    • #3
      I used pellets for a number of years and hated them every day. I found that the quality varied with each batch. Pellet stoves have a feed auger that supplies a small amount and are burned very intensely with the aid of a blower. I don't think that at any given time there is more and a cup of pellets in the burn chamber. I can't imagine them burning in a large container full without some kind of blower. I think your going to have a very smokey fire.
      _____________________________________________

      I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think I'll buy a bag of pellets when I get the 1/2 ton load of compressed wood bricks. I have burned some "sawdust" from the wood bricks that got wet or otherwise crumbled, and it seemed to burn OK. I found that a mix of wood bricks and firewood worked well, especially if the wood was not well seasoned. I have some large cherry trees that came down last year and they should be ready to cut, split, and burn.
        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

        Paul: www.peschoen.com
        P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
        and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Harvest the cherry for lumber and sell it. then buy twice as much firewood with the profits.

          Comment


          • #6
            According to my calculations of a cord of hardwood, you are paying $700 a cord equivalent for the bricks.

            What is cordwood selling for in you area?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
              Harvest the cherry for lumber and sell it. then buy twice as much firewood with the profits.
              Funny you should mention that. A while ago I had some very nice cherry trees blow down, so I talked to some people the run a sawmill who looked at them and agreed to give me $1600 for them. A few days later I was in town for the day and my son in law stopped by to cut fire wood, by the time I got back all that cherry was cut and split.

              Up here firewood is currently going for $150 a cord, pellets and bricks are running $200-$230 a ton, coal is about $250 a ton. I normally keep some coal and bricks around just because.

              Comment


              • #8
                That expanded metal can be hand bent to make fire baskets using a vise, some wood and a hammer (and heavy gloves!). It cuts well with a cut off disc, or even sawzall. It is easy to fold the ends to lock a shape. If using bolts, beware zinc and cadmium fumes.

                The BBQ crowd uses it to form baskets for charcoal. By using loose mild steel baffle plates you can force the charcoal to burn slowly, snaking along a path. Pieces of wood mixed in create smoke, and it burns for many hours. The basket also allows you to maintain the fire outside the smoker, reducing airborne ash and the amount of time the smoker is open.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Question of nomenclature

                  I don't know how much word borrowing there might be between different fields, but if the pellet burning stove is indeed a "pelleteer", would the leading front of the burning pellets be called the peleton?

                  Inquiring minds are just curious.
                  .
                  "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you fire the stove regularly, let's say a couple times weekly, that basket will be burnt out in a season.
                    I used 1/4" hot rolled angle for a grate when it was handy and lacked time for a better grate.
                    Gone in short order. SS probably better, but thickness is the trick.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Carm View Post
                      If you fire the stove regularly, let's say a couple times weekly, that basket will be burnt out in a season.
                      I used 1/4" hot rolled angle for a grate when it was handy and lacked time for a better grate.
                      Gone in short order. SS probably better, but thickness is the trick.
                      I have developed the habit of keeping an eye open for BBQ grills and kitchen stoves whenever I go to the scrap yard, the better quality ones of them have nice heavy cast iron grates

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Last year I contacted a couple of local sawmills, but they were not interested, even if I brought the logs to them. The downed trees are rather twisted so there might not be any straight sections longer than about 4 feet.

                        From last year:








                        The trees are located about 3/4 way to an upper meadow and access is via a steep, narrow trail, or from above via a rough, steep dirt road that is currently blocked by some dangerous leaners and is partially washed out with deep ruts. Firewood is going for about $200-$300 a cord delivered and dumped. One ton of compressed wood bricks is about $300-$350/ton and is about equivalent to a cord of average mixed firewood.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png

                        Paul: www.peschoen.com
                        P S Technology, Inc. www.pstech-inc.com
                        and Muttley www.muttleydog.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Paul,

                          I bought a pallet of the bricks from TSC.

                          What I noticed after the fact is they are lighter than the ones I bought last year from a different supplier.

                          Link to another supplier http://www.envirobrick.net/

                          I guess this seasons burn, will tell me whether to stay with TSC's vendor (close to where I work), or drive an hour one way to my original supplier's distributor.

                          I also use the bricks with firewood combo, easy start, then the wood ash insulates the brick core so hot coals allow for am restart.

                          Greg

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "Last year I contacted a couple of local sawmills, but they were not interested, even if I brought the logs to them. The downed trees are rather twisted so there might not be any straight sections longer than about 4 feet."

                            Too much reaction wood to make grade. If you knew a bandmill owner they would likely cut it for you, usually $x per bd/ft.

                            Little factoid for the wood burners, per pound, all woods yield the same BTU.
                            Don't recall where I saw that, Forest Products Lab or elsewhere.
                            Assumes typical air dry M/C.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here in the u k many years ago right up to the end of the sixties they used to sell coal briquettes. MY father used to make them as follows you need to get from your coal merchant as much Dross as he can supply you(within reason of course. This is basically the very small chips left on their floor when they sort out the bigger good stuff which is graded according to size etc. this should me mixed with some common cement concrete used for building.in equal amounts if your really tight and of course during word war 2 they were very much short of all things. He told me to spread it thinner knock up a good electric pair of heavy duty cutting blades , and fit this in a cement mixer type of metal bin/garbage can. You can then add straw hay old wood fibers sawdust etc when you mix a good batch just make a kind of wooden form just like a hand brick maker would use, after all looks are not important here.
                              Tapering the box for easy retrieval and a bit of fine coal dust to act as a not so fine release agent. You should mix this first of course very sparingly with water till it is damp not wet. This helps to bind. we used to buy these when I was a boy by the dozen. They burn nice and slow giving off a nice heat with not a bog flame. It is also a very world friendly way of using dross.

                              Although I am sure the millions of tons of this every year will no longer be tipped on coal heaps as it once was here in the UK coal mining regions . Then very sadly came the Aberfan disaster in South Wales , one terrible day exactly fifty years ago, one of these coal slags (during a heavy rainy spell ) came tumbling down a steep slope of this sludge directly on top of a children's school killing nearly all inside both teachers and parents.. Ah now maybe next time we curse the health and safety boards which were obviously non existent then, and also the building inspectors who allowed a school to be built below such a monstrous thing , and then of course the British coal board who very quickly washed their hands of the whole affair. Ah some say the good old days I can't see it myself. kindest regards to all my old friends once again
                              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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