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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by garagemark View Post
    Was there only three weeks ago. It rivals any museum I have ever seen, including the Smithsonian.

    As an aside, I had a long chat with one of the attendants watching over the cylinder head mill area (your second picture). He was explaining the machine operating concept, and how often the facing tools had to be replaced during a shift. He told me that this was long before carbide, and that they had quite a shop set up for sharpening all their tools. I then showed him the carbide face mill on the display (you have a fine shot of it as well). If what he said was true, the display was not a tool used in that era. But I have NOT fact checked what he said about carbide tools per se.

    Anyway, It cannot all be seen in a day trip. We'll most certainly go back again.
    I don't know if anyone caught it, but the very first picture shows a stationary steam engine with the head removed, an insitu boring mill bolted to the head flange, which is powered by a smaller steam engine. These things had to keep running to keep the factory going, fixing it on the spot was much easier.
    I believe the mill and grinder were donated to the museum.

    Leave a comment:


  • garagemark
    replied
    Was there only three weeks ago. It rivals any museum I have ever seen, including the Smithsonian.

    As an aside, I had a long chat with one of the attendants watching over the cylinder head mill area (your second picture). He was explaining the machine operating concept, and how often the facing tools had to be replaced during a shift. He told me that this was long before carbide, and that they had quite a shop set up for sharpening all their tools. I then showed him the carbide face mill on the display (you have a fine shot of it as well). If what he said was true, the display was not a tool used in that era. But I have NOT fact checked what he said about carbide tools per se.

    Anyway, It cannot all be seen in a day trip. We'll most certainly go back again.

    Leave a comment:


  • gambler
    replied
    cool pics thanks for sharing.

    Leave a comment:


  • justanengineer
    replied
    One of the Challengers was on display at the Henry Ford in the same area as Goldenrod and the hot rods last year. The wife and I usually spend most of the morning at the NAMES show then head over to the museum and village as they tend to be empty that weekend, as mentioned you can spend days exploring the property and then some. Rather ironically, I always joke that I should get a job at the old airport/Ford Tech Center across the street so I can spend my random free hours (lunch, before/after work, etc) at the museum and village, and recently had a job offer there. JMO but the museum/village is an engineer's version of Disney and definitely should be on most guys' bucket list to visit. For those unaware, Ford had his own school district at that site until 1969 with two one-room schoolhouses (elementary), a middle and high school (the museum building, "Edison Institute" and IIRC they taught 1st year college students on-site too through an agreement w/another school.

    Also in the area and Ford related is Ford's home at Fairlane which is currently closed for repair and Edsel's mansion across town is pretty spectacular too. On a similarly excessive scale and somewhat close too in Union IL is the Illinois Railway Museum, another great site for machine enthusiasts.

    Leave a comment:


  • v860rich
    replied
    Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
    The photo of Goldenrod, Summers Bros' record-breaking Bonneville streamliner was a surprise.

    The last time I read about this car, it was parked exposed to the elements out in front of the NHRA museum in Pomona.

    Searches bring up a couple of Hot Rod articles about the restoration, but this iPad I use is too crippled and obsolete to view them.

    What a treat to see GR looking good and under cover. I wonder where Mickey Thompson's Challengers wound up?

    .
    Mickey Thompson's son set a new record at Bonneville this year in his dad's Challenger.

    THANX RICH

    Leave a comment:


  • sasquatch
    replied
    Thanks also for the great photo tour! Very interesting!

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by DS_park View Post
    Guess you were inside buildings all day during one of the nicest fall days in SE Michigan.

    Okay, you've inspired me. Google claims I can get there from my office in less than 30 min.
    Some time this winter I'm going to call in sick and take a trip to the Henry Ford.
    There was so much more to see but I had to rush, had to make it back to the passport office. The outside village alone looks to be an entire day, and the 2.5 hour long tour of the F150 final assembly line would of been nice!

    Leave a comment:


  • DS_park
    replied
    Guess you were inside buildings all day during one of the nicest fall days in SE Michigan.

    Okay, you've inspired me. Google claims I can get there from my office in less than 30 min.
    Some time this winter I'm going to call in sick and take a trip to the Henry Ford.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    Thanks ever so much for the beautiful photos inside the Ford Museum.
    Amazing amount of beautifully restored iron there of every description. I can only imagine the incredible logistics involved in getting some of the irreplaceable machinery in there without damage, ya don't just slide a 800,000 lbs. Allegheny into it's slot without a bit of planning!

    Nice to see Bill Elliot's car, the '33 Willys of Ohio George Montgomery brings back memories as does the Summers bros. Goldenrod. Pleasantly surprised that Ford would honor a car with 4 Chrysler hemi engines but good to see that business and politics didn't play a part in history and or running a first class museum.

    Thanks again for taking the time to post the photos, much appreciated.
    I love steam locomotives but have to say, the giant stationary engines and power plants they have inside make the 1601 look very trivial in terms of logistics. I have to wonder if the museum was built around the power plant they have inside.

    Leave a comment:


  • browne92
    replied
    Love the little drag car. When the engine let go you could tell how bad it was blown by the amount of oil and fire in your face.

    Thanks for all the pics!

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Thanks ever so much for the beautiful photos inside the Ford Museum.
    Amazing amount of beautifully restored iron there of every description. I can only imagine the incredible logistics involved in getting some of the irreplaceable machinery in there without damage, ya don't just slide a 800,000 lbs. Allegheny into it's slot without a bit of planning!

    Nice to see Bill Elliot's car, the '33 Willys of Ohio George Montgomery brings back memories as does the Summers bros. Goldenrod. Pleasantly surprised that Ford would honor a car with 4 Chrysler hemi engines but good to see that business and politics didn't play a part in history and or running a first class museum.

    Thanks again for taking the time to post the photos, much appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    The photo of Goldenrod, Summers Bros' record-breaking Bonneville streamliner was a surprise.

    The last time I read about this car, it was parked exposed to the elements out in front of the NHRA museum in Pomona.

    Searches bring up a couple of Hot Rod articles about the restoration, but this iPad I use is too crippled and obsolete to view them.

    What a treat to see GR looking good and under cover. I wonder where Mickey Thompson's Challengers wound up?

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Interesting notes, that Nascar was the one Bill Elliot went 212 mph in,
    ... at Talladega in 1987, and Mr Elliot also ran 210 at Daytona that year.

    Bear in mind that these were lap speeds, averaged over the length of the track. Elliot was reaching peak speeds well above 212 down the straights. I forget and will look for numbers but will offer up guesses in the order of 240+/- for Vmax.

    That's a lot of speed for an '86 T-Bird. Too much, it was decided, after Bobby Allison's wreck that same year at Talladega that saw him sail into the fence and injure a number of spectators.

    Changes to slow the cars on the super speedways brought in the requirement for restrictor plates at Talladega and Daytona.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • flylo
    replied
    I love that place as well as Greenfield Village. One of my favorite places & can't wait to take my grandson there, maybe on Amtrack which has a stop right at Greenfield but it's not a long drive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stu
    replied
    Smithsonian, American History Museum.

    Leave a comment:

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