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  • OT moving a shop

    Any input on how big of pain it would be to move a 24 x 60 foot pole barn it has a concrete floor so I would say the poles are set with concrete. It would be a total tear down and moved 30 miles. I am thinking twice as much crane time as to build a new one and jackhammer/air compressor rental. One plus I do have a trailer I can haul it on.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by riverhawk View Post
    Any input on how big of pain it would be to move a 24 x 60 foot pole barn it has a concrete floor so I would say the poles are set with concrete. It would be a total tear down and moved 30 miles. I am thinking twice as much crane time as to build a new one and jackhammer/air compressor rental. One plus I do have a trailer I can haul it on.

    Thanks

    Prolly just depends. How many guys you gonna have helping you? Im not familiar with how pole barns are constructed. My assumption is that there are a bunch of big beams concreated into the ground then you just screw the sheet metal to the outside walls and roof trusses. My guess would be double the amount of time that it took to build.

    With that said you mentioned a jackhammer. Are you seriously considering removing the existing beams set in concrete ? Seems it would just be more economical to just buy new ones. Jackhammer / air rental / labor would surely be more $$ than buying new.

    But heck if I know thats a SWAG at best

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    • #3
      I put up a 40 x 60 pole barn about 6 years ago. Up on the Olympic Peninsula in WA State, not far from you.

      Earthquake country in the Pacific NW with complex building codes concerning how deep to set the poles and how much concrete to place in support of the poles. You most likely have earthquake codes in your area. The poles will be deep and have a lot of concrete!!! I think we set ours 8 feet down into the earth. Each surrounded by a 24 inch Sono Tube, then concrete poured into the tube and outside the tube to fill up the rest of the hole.

      So you need to visit your building permit agency and find out what the codes say.

      Put it up without permits? The other contractors, electricians, plumbers, etc, will not touch the building.

      After saying all that, I would not even think of tearing down and relocating a pole barn. Cheaper to build new.

      Crane time, the cost is out of sight. And you will need 2 times the cost.

      We had 6 guys putting the roofing on: Two moving the sheets from the staging area, two on scaffolding transferring sheets to the roof, and two guys on the roof placing sheets and screwing them down. Setting poles used up 5 guys: One on the crane, three spotting the poles, one guy doing the alignment measurement.

      Lots of work in the framing for the sidewalls. 4 man crew for two weeks. Each guy using a big framing nail gun. I would not even attempt a pole barn build without a nail gun for each guy. We used up 5 cases of galvanized framing nails. 5000 to a case. 25,000 nails.

      Setting rafters was a boom truck with operator, 4 guys on the ground and two guys up on the top of the walls. 14 foot eve height.

      Jack hammering concrete would be a big expense. Ever heard of hair pins? They connect the concrete floor to the concrete supporting the poles.

      We bought a pole barn kit from a supplier in Canby, I will dig out the contact info if you need it. They staged all the materials at the building site when delivered. All engineering was done by the supplier, obtaining permits was a piece of cake with the drawings they provided.

      What ever you do, insulate, insulate, insulate. Otherwise it will rain inside the building. We put 6 inches in the walls and 6 inches under the roof.

      Edit: M&W Building Supply Company, 22175 S. Highway 99E, Canby, Or 97013

      Jack hammering: Think of a slug of concrete 3 feet in diameter and 8 feet long around the base of each pole. You gonna jack hammer that off? Yea.
      Last edited by SilveradoHauler; 10-22-2016, 02:14 PM.

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      • #4
        Paying for labour is a huge factor. If you are doing this yourself in your spare time and can do much of the removal yourself before calling in a crane to lift the heavier timbers that is a big savings in cost and could justify such a job. But if you're paying an outfit to do the work for you I've got to wonder if it would not be cheaper to build from new.

        And yeah, I gotta agree with SiveradoHauler about the cost of a crane. Does it need to be a pole barn structure? Can you use some other construction style that might cost less in the end overall because it doesn't use any big machinery?

        Here again a large part of this depends on if you are in a position to supply a significant part of the labour or if you are paying a company or paying labourers to do the work for you. Not knowing the situation we can only suggests the questions you should be asking yourself and finding answers for.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Oddly I have done that several times.

          Easiest and cheapest is to use a hi-lift jack, drop the jack low and choke the post with a chain or cable, then jack it up. on very rare occasions you'll run into posts that have been cross drilled to 'lock' them into the footings or cross-drilled and 'pegged' with a length of galvanized bar/pipe for anchoring. Typically very seldom seen due to labor and cost even if code requires it. Heavy equipment skip loader, backhoe etc works, but is often slower than using a jack. In most cases the only concrete on the posts will be a pad at the bottom, they won't have concrete cast around them as a freestanding post would.

          Rest of it, just tear down in reverse order. Biggest problem will be if the panels (steel?) are nailed instead of screwed on, then it will take a long time to remove them without beating up the panels. If wood sided, use flat bars and wedges from inside to get at least one off first, then either pry or use a sawzall to cut nails.

          Just mark the panels so you which order they go back together, it's better than having to drill all new holes.


          Also, two people in reasonable shape can easily remove and install 24ft trusses. 24ft used to be the longest I would do alone.
          Last edited by kendall; 10-22-2016, 03:35 PM.

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          • #6
            Hey riverhawk,

            I and a friend took down a 20x40 pole barn in 2 weekends. We were only salvaging the metal skin, framing 2x6's and manufactured trusses 12' eaves. this was all done with hand tools and a sizer-lift that he owns and trailered to the job site. He didn't salvage the poles just got replacements. This was a 3 bay building with swing barn doors and coregated 3x12 sheets. We did have his teenage daughter and boyfriend as ground people for the roof removal the first day.
            May want to consider other options is all I'm suggesting. one thing too is the price, my fried's was free you hall!!

            TX
            Mr fixit for the family
            Chris

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            • #7
              Jack hammer? How about a chain saw and make the new shop shorter?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
                Jack hammer? How about a chain saw and make the new shop shorter?
                That's the best option is the posts have been anchored, dig below grade and cut them off, then bury.

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                • #9
                  Wouldn't a pole barn add to the value of the property being sold?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                    Wouldn't a pole barn add to the value of the property being sold?
                    What are you talking about? The OP is stealing it!

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                    • #11
                      I'd leave it and just buy a new one. Somebody asked to buy my 36'x56' to move. I told them it isn't worth the trouble. A new one is $10-12k as a kit. Mine is dirt floor.

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                      • #12
                        If the steel is screws on won't be a problem, if the post are set on pads won't be a problem just pull them up. If done the wrong way & concrete poured around them, cut them off & pour sono tube with 6x6 brackets at the new site. Use several guys with sawsall with steel cutting blades & it will go quick. You shouldn't need a crane with a 24' building.
                        Last edited by flylo; 10-22-2016, 06:29 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Excuse old-ish man's ignorance but I have heard the term pole barn before, but what is it exactly. ? Alistair
                          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                          • #14
                            They we're started in WW2 when material was in short supply. 4x6 or 6x6 post 8'OC with a 2x8 treated bottom board & 2x4s girth bds on the walls 2'OC with a double 2x12 or LVLs on the top of the post to set the trusses on, usually 2'OC for plywood & shingles or 4'0C with 2x4s 2'OC for steel. I like steel with trusses 32"OC. The link shows the post anchors & how they're built. DO NOT surround the post in concrete as they will rot right off as post are usually hearwood wich is dead cells which will not take treatment bus is rot resistant.
                            http://www.nfba.org/About/default/whatispostframe.html
                            Last edited by flylo; 10-22-2016, 06:41 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
                              Excuse old-ish man's ignorance but I have heard the term pole barn before, but what is it exactly. ? Alistair
                              Imagine a really big car port with roof trusses supported by posts and connecting beams around the top. Add 2x4 or 2x6 horizontal "strapping" to the posts and screw or nail on big sheets of corrugated metal siding/roofing. Windows, small and large doors are then added to allow a dash of light to get in and let people and contents move in and out.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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