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  • kendall
    replied
    Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
    Recent pole barns I have worked in did not have solid posts anymore. They were laminated up from 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 material. I was told by a builder that it was done so the pressure treatment went clear through the post, not just the outside. Back when I was contractor with a digger derrick I would sometimes get called to drill alongside rotted away posts and drop a new post along side which we through bolted to the old post. Worked well.
    Old style preservation method was to bore a 3/4" hole at a steep downward angle just above grade then pour an ounce or two of used motor oil into it at every oil change. alternate was to use naturally rot resistant wood when building. (sass, ceder, redwood etc)

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  • flylo
    replied
    I cut all my lumber (northern Hemlock) in the UP & had the post pressure treated .060 foundation grade KDAT. In the heated 12'x54' section I put 6" of Iso foam R 7.2 per inch so R 43 Then 1" over the entire inside so R50 so it heats well. I have electric baseboard, LP & waste oil heaters. It's a great way to build. The reason most post rotted was setting the post the putting concrete in the hole around the post so the post would rot off there. A 16" or 24" concrete disc or 2 in each gile with gravel around the post as Tundra did is spot on the right way. Just like a house that has to have gutters is built wrong.

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    My shop is pole style and happy with it,laminated treated 2x8 with R28 between the post then 1-1/2 R5 styrofoam on both sides of the wall.It is metal clad both sides,posts sit on concrete plug then gravel tamped tight around post.

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  • garyhlucas
    replied
    Recent pole barns I have worked in did not have solid posts anymore. They were laminated up from 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 material. I was told by a builder that it was done so the pressure treatment went clear through the post, not just the outside. Back when I was contractor with a digger derrick I would sometimes get called to drill alongside rotted away posts and drop a new post along side which we through bolted to the old post. Worked well.

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  • Boostinjdm
    replied
    Pole building...

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by Alistair Hosie View Post
    Excuse old-ish man's ignorance but I have heard the term pole barn before, but what is it exactly. ? Alistair
    Imagine a really big car port with roof trusses supported by posts and connecting beams around the top. Add 2x4 or 2x6 horizontal "strapping" to the posts and screw or nail on big sheets of corrugated metal siding/roofing. Windows, small and large doors are then added to allow a dash of light to get in and let people and contents move in and out.

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  • flylo
    replied
    They we're started in WW2 when material was in short supply. 4x6 or 6x6 post 8'OC with a 2x8 treated bottom board & 2x4s girth bds on the walls 2'OC with a double 2x12 or LVLs on the top of the post to set the trusses on, usually 2'OC for plywood & shingles or 4'0C with 2x4s 2'OC for steel. I like steel with trusses 32"OC. The link shows the post anchors & how they're built. DO NOT surround the post in concrete as they will rot right off as post are usually hearwood wich is dead cells which will not take treatment bus is rot resistant.
    http://www.nfba.org/About/default/whatispostframe.html
    Last edited by flylo; 10-22-2016, 05:41 PM.

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Excuse old-ish man's ignorance but I have heard the term pole barn before, but what is it exactly. ? Alistair

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  • flylo
    replied
    If the steel is screws on won't be a problem, if the post are set on pads won't be a problem just pull them up. If done the wrong way & concrete poured around them, cut them off & pour sono tube with 6x6 brackets at the new site. Use several guys with sawsall with steel cutting blades & it will go quick. You shouldn't need a crane with a 24' building.
    Last edited by flylo; 10-22-2016, 05:29 PM.

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  • Boostinjdm
    replied
    I'd leave it and just buy a new one. Somebody asked to buy my 36'x56' to move. I told them it isn't worth the trouble. A new one is $10-12k as a kit. Mine is dirt floor.

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  • Tony Ennis
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Wouldn't a pole barn add to the value of the property being sold?
    What are you talking about? The OP is stealing it!

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  • RB211
    replied
    Wouldn't a pole barn add to the value of the property being sold?

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  • kendall
    replied
    Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
    Jack hammer? How about a chain saw and make the new shop shorter?
    That's the best option is the posts have been anchored, dig below grade and cut them off, then bury.

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  • 1-800miner
    replied
    Jack hammer? How about a chain saw and make the new shop shorter?

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  • Mr Fixit
    replied
    Hey riverhawk,

    I and a friend took down a 20x40 pole barn in 2 weekends. We were only salvaging the metal skin, framing 2x6's and manufactured trusses 12' eaves. this was all done with hand tools and a sizer-lift that he owns and trailered to the job site. He didn't salvage the poles just got replacements. This was a 3 bay building with swing barn doors and coregated 3x12 sheets. We did have his teenage daughter and boyfriend as ground people for the roof removal the first day.
    May want to consider other options is all I'm suggesting. one thing too is the price, my fried's was free you hall!!

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

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