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Sterling machine as school project

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  • Sterling machine as school project

    I truly hate school projects

    I searched BBS for half an hour, sterling machines here are amazing pieces of machining, but I need to guide and help my kid to build one as high school project - machining is not really an option.

    Anybody has a fool proof way to build working sterling machine? I tried soda cans and that pringle style and I am starting to feel like an idiot.

    Ideas?

  • #2
    Do you mean a Sterling "hot air" engine?
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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    • #3
      A Stirling engine made of sterling is certainly a possibility. Good heat conductivity where it's needed but aluminum would be much more economical.
      .
      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        First of all, its Stirling (pet peeve). I'll get over it .

        Second, a Fluidyne would be good for a no machining school project.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluidyne_engine is a place to start.

        Edit: A Fluidyne is considered a Stirling engine.
        www.thecogwheel.net

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        • #5
          No machining here and there are more examples.


          http://www.scraptopower.co.uk/can-st...tirling-engine
          Helder Ferreira
          Setubal, Portugal

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          • #6
            Yeah, Sterling, stirling, lol. Sometimes I wonder, thank you for all suggestions.

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            • #7
              Sterling engines generally have a very low power output, even under favorable circumstances. So, there are several key issues to watch or they just won't run.

              1. Minimal friction, so this means proper material selection

              2. zero binding, everything has to be straight and square and proper tolerances if anything fits close. There can't be any rubbing or scraping

              3. The bigger the temperature differential from the hot side to the cold side, the more motive power you have to work with.

              4. good sealing, but without inducing friction


              Good luck, we're rooting for you.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Prokop View Post
                Yeah, Sterling, stirling, lol. Sometimes I wonder, thank you for all suggestions.
                Reverend Dr Robert Stirling. Its a mans name after all.. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Stirling

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                • #9
                  A syringe, test tube and some marbles...

                  http://3dpnexus.com/3d-print-friday-...irling-engine/

                  make for fascinating eye candy.

                  The ratchet wheel can be sawn/carved from thin plywood.
                  Regards, Marv

                  Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                  http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                  Location: LA, CA, USA

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                  • #10
                    Prokop, shouldn't it be your son asking the questions? Otherwise it is just a project his Dad did.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Normanv View Post
                      Prokop, shouldn't it be your son asking the questions? Otherwise it is just a project his Dad did.
                      True, he is doing his research, but I want to look smart too

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Prokop View Post
                        I truly hate school projects

                        I searched BBS for half an hour, sterling machines here are amazing pieces of machining, but I need to guide and help my kid to build one as high school project - machining is not really an option.

                        Anybody has a fool proof way to build working sterling machine? I tried soda cans and that pringle style and I am starting to feel like an idiot.

                        Ideas?
                        Have a look at Morris Dovey's work:
                        http://www.iedu.com/Solar/

                        Here's a pump built out of PVC pipe I'm not sure what your exact requirements are, but perhaps this will help you get started.
                        http://www.iedu.com/Solar/Engines/Fl.../Fluidyne.html

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