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  • Move compressor to outside building

    Hopefully this winter ill be adding a carport to either the rear or side of my garage. I figure since ill already have a roof why not frame off a small area to keep the compressor.

    Anyone see anything bad about this? It will not be heated or cooled so it will be subject to the typical KY climate swings. The garage is currently not heated or cooled so I cant see why this would be a bad idea. It would get me some room back and also be quieter when running.

    thanks

  • #2
    As long as it has plenty of ventilation it should be fine. I had mine in a closet sized shed for a couple of years. One side had an old panel from an a/c condenser and the other side had a 20" box fan mounted to draw air through the shed. I wouldn't just close it up as they generate a lot of heat.

    You don't say what size but a lot of noise comes from the intake. If it doesn't already have a good filter, adding one will quiet it down some too.

    Added: I also made an extension for the drain and mounted a valve outside of the shed so it was easy to drain.
    Last edited by CCWKen; 10-24-2016, 02:48 PM.

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    • #3
      I've got mine located in the barn and piped over to the shop (about 30 feet). I can still hear it but the noise is not irritating in the least.

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      • #4
        Water (condensate) can freeze in the tank in the winter. This may/will prevent draining the tank. Could damage the drain valve. I guess you could add a small heater.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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        • #5
          Water accumulation in the tank and dampness / temp swings / condensation and a sweating compressor would be my first concern but if you shop isn't heated or dehumidified probably not much diff. I would insulate the room to minimize temp swings and sweating. It'll also help with the sound.
          I got to wonder, a lot of you guys complain about noise. How much does your compressor run throughout the day??? unless your running air sanders or bead blasting.
          Mine is in the back room, I can hear it but it never really bothered me....... not like the phone ringing all the time.

          JL....................

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          • #6
            I know you say the enclosure won't be heated or cooled but you may have to if your area experiences severe temperature extremes. You shouldn't operate your compressor outside of its oil's temperature range.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • #7
              When was the last time you had a hard freeze in Beaumont?

              If you're using the compressor, the tank will stay warm enough to not freeze.

              Drain the water after each use or at the end of the day. You don't have to empty the tank of air. Open the drain valve until it blows air. I've had my drain valve freeze in the middle of summer while draining. You can hear it hissing then it stops. About a minute or two later you hear a pop from the ice plug blowing out and hissing starts again. Mine will do it several times while draining the entire 80-gallon tank.

              If you won't be using it for a while (days, weeks, etc.) then drain the tank of air.

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              • #8
                If you're like me, and find it troublesome to regularly crawl under the tank to open and close the drain valve, spend the $10 to get a drain valve with a cable, so that you can just walk up to it and pull on the cable, which opens the valve and then release it to close the valve.

                If you make it easy to do, it's easier to do it regularly (which the tanks like)

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                • #9
                  I agree with Dave R about the drain cable but I would also put a block heater magnetic or wrap style in case of a freeze to warm the oil.

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                  • #10
                    So I was considering insulating the building... more for sound deadening but it would also help with temp swings. what im curious about is why the need for a heater or worry about the oil temp. The compressor oil is a synthetic oil for compressors so I cant imagine the viscosity is all that much different at 20* vs 80*. But I cant say ive checked.

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                    • #11
                      Also my compressor has an auto take drain so I could just run the line outside of the building.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Axkiker View Post
                        So I was considering insulating the building... more for sound deadening but it would also help with temp swings. what im curious about is why the need for a heater or worry about the oil temp. The compressor oil is a synthetic oil for compressors so I cant imagine the viscosity is all that much different at 20* vs 80*. But I cant say ive checked.
                        As far as viscosity goes, here's a graph of how SAE 30 changes with temperature; from http://www.viscopedia.com/viscosity-...es/engine-oil/



                        Here's anther graph from http://blog.nulon.com.au/uploads/2013/10/Temp-graph.jpg



                        As you can see, at higher temperatures there's not near the difference in viscosity amongst different weight oils as there is at lower temperatures.

                        When it's cold oil viscosity increases which impedes it's ability to wick into the bearing surfaces on a connecting rod that's lubed by the splash method which is how most air compressors are lubed. This can lead to a seized bearing. High viscosity oil also causes very hard starting which in turn is hard on the motor. All in all, there's much more chance of damage from a lack of lubrication brought on by using a heavier weight oil that is better suited for warmer ambient air temperatures.

                        This chart from http://www.machinerylubrication.com/...ose-engine-oil shows different weight oils recommended for the low/high ambient air temperatures which vehicle engines operate at and since it's viscosity that's important you should be able to use the same chart as a guideline for choosing what oil to use in your compressor.

                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                        • #13
                          I have my air compressor mounted in a remote shed. I ran a control wire to solenoid on the compressor output so the air doesn't flow unless my shop lights are on. I put another solenoid on the tank drain, wired it to the compressor power. Put a restriction in line and You have an automatic drain valve.

                          Mike

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                          • #14
                            I mounted mine outside as I'm moving my shop, here it is a common practice to have the compressor outside, and lot of home auto shops do that, in fact the plant is work in has the air compressors mounted in unheated buildings so it will work.

                            Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk

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                            • #15
                              I have a Sullair 5hp 80 gallon two stage compressor sitting in my auto shop for the last 10 years or so and it runs from time to time with no heat and hasn't been a problem so far.

                              There are also many garages that keep the compressors outside.

                              One thing to keep in mind though is that the noise that isn't in your shop is now outside and if you live in the city or it is next to a wall where someone is looking for peace and quiet that might be a problem.

                              Brian
                              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                              THINK HARDER

                              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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