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  • Not facing

    What do you call the lathe operation when, instead of 'facing' a piece of stock mounted into a chuck, you plunge into the face? I have a piece of 4" steel mounted up and I'm trying to carve out a cylinder about 2" deep from the face while leaving a 3/4" stud standing out from the center.

    I'm trying to do it with a HSS steel cutter with a flat face (appropriate relief angles ground into the cutter).
    I'm trying to get the hole roughed out enough that I can use a boring bar for final clean up....but dang this isn't going well. LOT's of chatter and shaking.

    Anyone have a hint?

  • #2
    Trepanning?
    edit: try googling images for trepanning, the majority is about skull drilling :-)
    Last edited by ikdor; 10-25-2016, 02:53 PM.

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    • #3
      Face grooving?

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      • #4
        Well its not trepanning (looked it up) because it's leaving no core piece..it's coming out in chips. It must be called face grooving.

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        • #5
          Your tool needs to be a section of a tube in order to provide adequate support to the cutting edge and clearance as it plunges into the work.
          Inserted tools are available for face grooving, a limited range of diameters are supported by a given tool,
          Regards,
          Nick
          If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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          • #6
            Suitable hole saws to get deep grooves?

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            • #7
              trepanning might be to cut out the center, but you can still use a trepanning bit to do what you propose. You can grind them to cut to the left (towards OD of piece) or right (towards center). You can use the left cutting trepanning bit to cut the ID of the outer bit and face the bottom of the groove, and a LH boring bar to cut the OD of the stub.

              Lots of pics on the net of trepanning bits, they're not hard to grind, you just need to make sure the heel doesn't rub at the diameter you're plunging in.

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              • #8
                You are trying to bore, but want to preserve the core? Lot of work, just turn it into chips, or get a proper size of material.

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                • #9
                  Sounds like you are doing something like what was discussed here:

                  http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/71744-What-Could-Have-Moved-Here



                  Another option would be a rotary table and an end-cutting mill. In a milling machine, of course. But it might also work in the toolholder of a lathe.
                  http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                  Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                  USA Maryland 21030

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                  • #10
                    Tools are available to do this, here's one: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sandvik-C4...gAAOSwv-NWWLoB

                    It's on an odd mount, but they come with square shanks too. Or brew your own. They have a range of inner & outer radii in which they can work, buy / design as appropriate.

                    Ian
                    All of the gear, no idea...

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                    • #11
                      Google "axial grooving tools", you'll get lots more images.

                      Ian
                      All of the gear, no idea...

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                      • #12
                        Thanks gents! This will jump start my efforts.
                        I'm using the solid bar stock because its what I have on hand.
                        I'm preserving the center section so I can thread it. When done it will be part of a lathe tool.
                        Paul that is much like I'm trying to do except I need to go in about 1.7" deep
                        Ian I'll likely take the home made route....Iscar had some suitable (and very nice) tooling as well.

                        Bill

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                        • #13
                          trepanning . Called the same thing when done on the mill (ie cuts out a disk)....I think if you had to define it vs boring, it would be something along the lines of a making a cut that produces a circular groove in a flat surface.
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                          • #14
                            Adam Booth with a trepanning tool.

                            https://youtu.be/PbFLW0_HIAU?t=12m40s

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                            • #15
                              1.7" deep is a LONG way if the groove isn't wide enough to allow for a very stiff bar style tool. I foresee a case of near terminal chatter in your future.

                              Steel simply is not that costly to justify trying to save the core.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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