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  • Allen-Bradley power supply

    My buddy has a DoAll lathe that has anAllen-Bradly 1606XL24v 1A power supply that operates the brake. Ithas a couple blown Thermisters and a blown IC UCC813N-0. Does anyonehave , or know where I can get a schematic to repair this powersupply?


    Chuck

  • #2
    Can't find a x-reference to UCC813N-O

    If Texas Instruments device it may be part of the family:
    http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ucc3813-0.pdf

    Comment


    • #3
      I might be able to help if you give me the entire catalog #. 1606XL24v is not valid as far as I can tell. If it is a brand labeled supply, I may be out of luck on the schematic. Some of these come from SOLA (hint, hint).

      Comment


      • #4
        If it is, as it seems likely actually a UCC3813, or other similar control chip, it is nearly a guarantee that it has other problems as well.

        Those power supplies, despite being relatively expensive, are actually "throwaway units". When they quit, you toss them and replace. There are tons of 24V power supplies that will run the unit as well as that did. Digi-key should have plenty of them, mostly imports, but, then, so was the one you are asking about.

        If you were to get a cheap asian one to replace, I suggest getting one of 2A, just because some of the asian units are slightly over-rated, and the brake may have a surge that an optimistic 1A rating wont cover.

        Speaking of which, before worrying about a power supply, I suggest you cobble up something, or borrow a 24V lab supply, to test the brake. Those A-B supplies are usually reasonably robust, and the failure may have been triggered by a brake problem.

        If you insist on repairing the unit, I doubt you will find a schematic. Usually they are not released for that sort of unit. I suspect, moreover, that the unit will become a time-pit, and will not repay repair attempts with restored reliable operation unless you are familiar with them and know what to look for in terms of parts and typical failure.

        I have designed a number of SMPS units up to about 100x the power level, and I would not consider a repair to be a good use of my time, in general.
        Last edited by J Tiers; 10-25-2016, 10:02 PM.
        CNC machines only go through the motions

        Comment


        • #5
          If this is a simple DC brake, they rarely if ever require a regulated supply, all the brakes and clutches I have ever used and installed I used a simple transformer and a bridge, no cap needed.
          Much more sturdy and reliable.
          Max.

          Comment


          • #6
            That is probably a house number on that IC.

            A 24V, 1A power supply is about as generic as you can get. I would just buy a new supply.

            http://www.digikey.com/product-detai...X24-ND/4486038

            Here is a list of about 250 of them. The least expensive one ($14.41) would probably be OK for your use.

            http://www.mouser.com/Power/Power-Su...ng%7c0&FS=True

            These are new products from well known suppliers so there would be no problems with warranty. And there are many, many more sources. It just isn't worth the time and effort to repair one.



            Originally posted by bob_s View Post
            Can't find a x-reference to UCC813N-O

            If Texas Instruments device it may be part of the family:
            http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ucc3813-0.pdf
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #7
              My humble apologies, the label on the supply in question has 10A on it, not 1 A. I asked the owner to recheck the part # on the tag. I think I wrote everything down, but I may have missed something.The lathe break is working with a different supply installed. My buddy would like to fix this one as a back up or for other uses. My time is my own, as I'm retired, so is my buddy. Though he is a retired tool and die maker and sometimes uses his lathe to make spare income.

              Chuck

              Comment


              • #8
                10A sounds more reasonable for a lathe.

                But the answer is the same. It's disposable.

                And the brake probably does not need that degree of regulation, although it won't actually hurt it to have that.

                You are welcome to try to fix it, of course. Be prepared to replace many things that you have not listed. And, unless you are very careful and thorough, to replace them 2 or even 3 times. All parts are important, so if you miss one bad part, you can expect to have the thing fail again, possibly in a spectacular manner that requires extensive replacement of the same parts, plus the missed bad one(s).

                Thre is also the chance that your decision has been made for you, although you do not yet know it, because the failure may have damaged the PWB in such a way that there is a missing area of it, or that there are parts which you will have to correctly identify as to type, value etc, all from the charred lump that remains of the old part, even if the PWB is OK.

                Many of those supplies are also made in a way that is not friendly to fixing. Boards soldered together in ways that block repairs unless a number of connections are removed first.

                If you must, you must, but I suggest you take a very good look at the innards of the thing first, to be sure that there is nothing that precludes a repair right off the bat.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

                Comment


                • #9
                  Chuck, H.D. has a couple of 24vac transformers that I have used in the past with no problems for a small clutch and a brake.
                  Just add a bridge.
                  Just measure the coil resistance this will tell you the current at 24vdc.
                  Max.
                  Last edited by MaxHeadRoom; 10-26-2016, 10:21 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I might be able to help if you give me the entire catalog #. 1606XL24v is not valid as far as I can tell. If it is a brand labeled supply, I may be out of luck on the schematic. Some of these come from SOLA (hint, hint).[/QUOTE]

                    Had the guy look again at the tag, the whole part # is 1606XL240E.

                    Chuck

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good luck getting anything out of A.B. they won't give out anything and are usually Way over priced.
                      Max.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The only thing that I can suggest is to look-up the FCC ID for the device and see if anything has been filed with the patent application.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I agree that it is easier and probably less expensive to replace it, even at 10 Amps. Check out the links I provided above. Just change the search terms on those sites.

                          The power supply OEM is probably well aware of this and that is why the service information is hard to get: no one wants it. And for something as simple as a power supply, any good electronic tech will be able to figure out the circuit in his head and will also know what components can be easily replaced with generic ones. As for that IC, if it is bad the unit really is a boat anchor or a paper weight or a source of parts for other things.



                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          10A sounds more reasonable for a lathe.

                          But the answer is the same. It's disposable.

                          And the brake probably does not need that degree of regulation, although it won't actually hurt it to have that.

                          You are welcome to try to fix it, of course. Be prepared to replace many things that you have not listed. And, unless you are very careful and thorough, to replace them 2 or even 3 times. All parts are important, so if you miss one bad part, you can expect to have the thing fail again, possibly in a spectacular manner that requires extensive replacement of the same parts, plus the missed bad one(s).

                          Thre is also the chance that your decision has been made for you, although you do not yet know it, because the failure may have damaged the PWB in such a way that there is a missing area of it, or that there are parts which you will have to correctly identify as to type, value etc, all from the charred lump that remains of the old part, even if the PWB is OK.

                          Many of those supplies are also made in a way that is not friendly to fixing. Boards soldered together in ways that block repairs unless a number of connections are removed first.

                          If you must, you must, but I suggest you take a very good look at the innards of the thing first, to be sure that there is nothing that precludes a repair right off the bat.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I would imagine this is a transformer based power supply. As such it's probably going to be very basic in its initial circuitry, in other words a secondary winding, bridge rectifier and filter capacitor. I wonder what it's supposed to do other than that- does it regulate the output voltage down to a certain level and hold it there, or does it have a bit of smarts in that it might apply full voltage to the brake, then ease back the current after a few seconds to help keep the brake from overheating-

                            I'm wondering also about the age of it- if it's for a Doall it's probably not very modern. It probably would have been quite sophisticated for its day, having an IC and all. If that's a voltage regulator IC it might have been the precursor to the 723 regulator which is one of the early ones also. In this application there's no need for the level of precision that these ICs provide. A simple three terminal regulator and one power transistor would give more than enough control and is an easy circuit to build. You could probably scrap the pc board in there and cobble together a working replacement circuit without needing a pc board at all.

                            Yes, endeavors like this take time and are prone to exciting failure modes if not executed properly. Were it me, I'd dive right in- but I do have an extensive electronics background and I don't mind putting some time into such projects as I do somewhat enjoy it still.

                            Would like to see a picture of the insides-
                            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by darryl View Post
                              I would imagine this is a transformer based power supply. As such it's probably going to be very basic in its initial circuitry, in other words a secondary winding, bridge rectifier and filter capacitor. ...
                              Not hardly...

                              SMPS DIN rail power supplies. Your first clue is ANY IC with a UCC number. That's Unitrode, and they (part of TI now) make SMPS controllers.

                              Look up the number

                              http://ab.rockwellautomation.com/Pow...Power-Supplies
                              CNC machines only go through the motions

                              Comment

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