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OT: Was this saw made in China?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
    Seriously. The saw was good for sheet materials and not much else. The slots were rusted and worn enough that the miter gage would not sit at 90 degrees anywhere ahead of the blade and at the leading edge of the table the right one was out about .020 for the first several inches.
    So you can use a hand held circular saw and eyeball it to greater accuracy doing a 90o cut than possible on that table saw and hold a cut to less than plus or minus .010" deviation. Absolutely believable.
    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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    • #32
      Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
      If you're using the right blade (zero to negative rake), ripping is no more dangerous than on a table saw (which has it's own set of hazards).
      You've had either little or no experience using a radial arm saw. When ripping on a table saw, There is (or should be) little blade exposure, since most of the blade is below the table. With a RA saw the whole blade is in your face.
      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

      Lewis Grizzard

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      • #33
        Originally posted by oldwing View Post
        My Sawstop contractor saw is belt driven with a cast iron top. Best saw I ever had.
        I stand corrected. The cheapest one starts at $1600. Does it make a used craftsman at $100 and some work look good?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Dave C View Post
          You've had either little or no experience using a radial arm saw. When ripping on a table saw, There is (or should be) little blade exposure, since most of the blade is below the table. With a RA saw the whole blade is in your face.
          You mean the RAS in my woodshop? The one I built my granddaughter's cradle with (in ash, BTW)? And (later) her play table? Would you like pictures? The RAS I recently used to rip several hundred feet of pine to 1X1? The RAS I used to build a portable camp kitchen out of 4mm Baltic birch sheet? That saw? Yeah, I actually have a lot of experience with one. The next project is going to be rebuilding a staircase.

          BTW- I have both eyeballs and all ten fingers.

          Originally posted by Dave C View Post
          When ripping on a table saw, There is (or should be) little blade exposure, since most of the blade is below the table.
          That's one of those stupid shop rules that is only sometimes true. Some sheet goods (melamine, thin ply) and some softwoods need more blade height: if the blade is too low, sheet material can be pushed out of the saw- 1 inch height is recommended for thin/sheet material. That will also cut down on chipping. Some softwoods need more blade height so the gullets clear the work, allowing better sawdust ejection and preventing burning.

          Originally posted by Dave C View Post
          With a RA saw the whole blade is in your face.
          Only if you put your face near the blade. I don't.

          You know, I posted about the miter slots as a friendly warning: I'm sorry you took it personally. Next time you post about some money pit you bought, I'll be sure to stay silent.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Arcane View Post
            So you can use a hand held circular saw and eyeball it to greater accuracy doing a 90o cut than possible on that table saw and hold a cut to less than plus or minus .010" deviation. Absolutely believable.
            Who said anything about eyeballing the cut? I use a speed square as a guide. Old contractor's trick.

            The .010" slop was in the miter gage slot- when the distance from the slot to the blade and the width of the work is figured in, that slop stacks up to about 1/32" for a 2X4. That's not acceptable.

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            • #36
              CarlByrns : You know, I posted about the miter slots as a friendly warning: I'm sorry you took it personally. Next time you post about some money pit you bought, I'll be sure to stay silent.
              I never intended this thread to start a pi$$ing contest. The original question was posed more tongue in cheek than anything. I appreciate everyone's input with relative information about the saw, including your friendly warning about the miter slots. What I take exception to is the comments that buying the saw was a mistake. As to your "money pit" remark, I won't have much $ in it other than a few dollars for bearings and paint, and it will be just fine for chopping the end off the occasional broomstick, with the added advantage of not throwing sawdust in my face. Stay silent if that's your wish, but don't do it on my account. There is always something to be gained from reading peoples posts including yours.
              Last edited by Dave C; 11-09-2016, 12:41 PM.
              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

              Lewis Grizzard

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              • #37
                Originally posted by H380 View Post
                I stand corrected. The cheapest one starts at $1600. Does it make a used craftsman at $100 and some work look good?
                It won't cut my fingers off.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by oldwing View Post
                  It won't cut my fingers off.
                  It also won't do squat to protect you from the most common table saw related injury, kick back.
                  -Dan S.
                  dans-hobbies.com

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