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OT: Was this saw made in China?

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  • OT: Was this saw made in China?

    Like I needed another project. Wife thinks I'm nuts, but I took on this pos table saw anyway. Its a Craftsman, 113.298032, and I wish I knew how old it is. It's a mess, and lived in a storage shed since last used 5 years ago. It's rusty, dirty, loaded with dirt dauber nests, and in general appears to have been the victim of abuse. I neglected to take a picture before tearing it down, but here are some to give you the idea:


    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  • #2
    This is after about an hour with a wire cup brush on the big angle grinder, and scraping, and wiping down with mineral spirits.


    Why I suspect it was made in China. This is the arbor casting with foundry sand in the cavity between the bearing recesses:

    The bearings were sealed, but they were shot. Maybe some fine grit got past the seals.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

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    • #3
      Made by Emerson electric.

      -D
      DZER

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      • #4
        In USA.

        -D
        DZER

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        • #5
          Yeah, St. Louis, but I wonder where they got their castings from? There was a lot of industry there when I was living there in the late '60s. Must have been at least one foundry. I don't know if Emerson had their own though.
          Last edited by Dave C; 11-01-2016, 02:04 PM.
          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

          Lewis Grizzard

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dave C View Post

            Why I suspect it was made in China. This is the arbor casting with foundry sand in the cavity between the bearing recesses:
            America is capable of producing crap products just like anywhere else. We just don't do it as cheaply!

            I can't speak to this part specifically, but I've seen castings coming out of a USA foundry that had huge gas voids, sand inclusions, etc. in them. And this was for parts going on an aircraft carrier! Needless to say, we switched foundries, but the point is: made in USA is no guarantee of quality.

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            • #7
              I found the owners manual on line, and it was printed in 1984. So that makes the saw about 32 years old.
              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

              Lewis Grizzard

              Comment


              • #8
                Agree with Doozer! Emerson.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dave C View Post
                  I found the owners manual on line, and it was printed in 1984. So that makes the saw about 32 years old.
                  Dave contact this guy [email protected] his name is Robert he knows a lot about craftsman power tools. He is mostly into craftsman/atlas lathes but he help me with certain craftsman parts, don't hurt to try.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks GEP, I'll give him a shout. Meanwhile I'll be setting up the electrolysis tank to derust some of these parts.
                    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                    Lewis Grizzard

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Built by Emerson Electric. They made millions of them and aren't worth 'restoring'.

                      if the table was rusted at all, the slots for the miter gage will be too wide- the saw will never cut a perfect 90 degree crosscut.

                      You can find well-cared for examples on CL for $100- $150.

                      FYI-The foundry was in Ann Arbor. The same one that did the castings for the Craftsman 109.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
                        Built by Emerson Electric. They made millions of them and aren't worth 'restoring'.

                        if the table was rusted at all, the slots for the miter gage will be too wide- the saw will never cut a perfect 90 degree crosscut.

                        You can find well-cared for examples on CL for $100- $150.

                        FYI-The foundry was in Ann Arbor. The same one that did the castings for the Craftsman 109.
                        Well then...that's a real good excuse to make a table saw sled. I'm sure there's relatively easy methods to tighten up the stock runner, too.
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
                          Built by Emerson Electric. They made millions of them and aren't worth 'restoring'.

                          if the table was rusted at all, the slots for the miter gage will be too wide- the saw will never cut a perfect 90 degree crosscut.

                          You can find well-cared for examples on CL for $100- $150.

                          FYI-The foundry was in Ann Arbor. The same one that did the castings for the Craftsman 109.
                          It came from CL, and was less than $100. The miter gage slots are in pretty good shape, and besides that, I don't plan to be making precision parts with this saw.
                          The eBay chinese bearings came today, and they look and feel pretty good. I think they will suit my purposes just fine.
                          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                          Lewis Grizzard

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                            I'm sure there's relatively easy methods to tighten up the stock runner, too.
                            That depends on if the slots are evenly worn along their length or not. Usually the right slot is somewhat tapered because, just like a lathe, all the action happens in one area.

                            Sure, you can make a wider runner but then both slots has to have the same width along their length for the runner to fit end-to-end. That's a big milling job.

                            Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                            Well then...that's a real good excuse to make a table saw sled.
                            A sled is only as good as the slots it rides in. Anything less than parallel and the sled will bind.
                            Last edited by CarlByrns; 11-06-2016, 10:00 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dave C View Post
                              It came from CL, and was less than $100. The miter gage slots are in pretty good shape, and besides that, I don't plan to be making precision parts with this saw.
                              The eBay chinese bearings came today, and they look and feel pretty good. I think they will suit my purposes just fine.
                              Just trying to save you some grief: I've been down this road before with a family heirloom table saw that sat in a dry barn for years and the slots were out-of-spec after derusting. Bottom line: the saw wasn't worth the time and effort to make it accurate. Believe me, we tried.

                              Originally posted by Dave C View Post
                              I don't plan to be making precision parts with this saw.
                              Making precision cuts is what table saws are all about. If the miter gage is off as little as .010 inch, you won't be able to cut anything to a true 90 and it will show. On my saw, I couldn't get a straight cut on a 2x4 that would be good enough for framing, much less trim. To put that into perspective, I could get a better cut with a hand-held circular saw than that table saw.

                              Measure twice, cut once.
                              Last edited by CarlByrns; 11-06-2016, 10:00 AM.

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