Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Centering a threading bar

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Centering a threading bar

    How is the best way to center a threading bar? I just use a scrap pice that I faced and go off the center tit.

  • #2
    Best way? I'd say that's to use a gauge that is preset to the center height of the lathe. I've seen them as simple as a piece of aluminum that sits on the cross slide with a line that was scratched on it by a carbide scribe held in the chuck.

    I've seen as complex as a magnetic base with multiple ledges that are set at the center height as well as a known amount below and above it.

    But your idea of using a freshly faced piece as a reference is good too.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      I us a steel 6" scale pinched between the piece and the tool bit. If the scale is plumb vertical it is good. If it leans to front or back you are high or low. Try it it works.

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        The tail stock barrels on several makes of lathes I have ran had the center height marked by a line on the side of the barrel.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
          The tail stock barrels on several makes of lathes I have ran had the center height marked by a line on the side of the barrel.
          And on those which are not marked in this way it would not be that hard to set up and make such a mark.

          Comment


          • #6
            I had a lathe with a nifty shop-made pointer. A piece of 1.5" mild steel with a recess turned in the base to prevent rocking, a cone turned in the other end with a small hole drilled and tapped in the top of the cone. The pointer was a piece of thin rod with a long thread one end, a point turned in the other and bent 90 degrees. You sat it on the cross-slide and adjusted the point to centre height then locked it with a lock-nut. It could be used to set any tool height and moved quickly out of the way.
            Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

            Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
            Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
            Monarch 10EE 1942

            Comment


            • #7
              .....
              DZER

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by sewingmachine View Post
                I us a steel 6" scale pinched between the piece and the tool bit. If the scale is plumb vertical it is good. If it leans to front or back you are high or low. Try it it works.

                Dave
                I was taught this method by an old tool & die maker and used it for 30+ years. Quick, easy and accurate.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I like scribing the TS tube. As far as pinching a scale, do that too hard with a carbide insert, and its toast. Go ahead and ask me......

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I use a piece of stainless filler wire cut to the right length just stand it up on the saddle to indicate tool height easy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rws View Post
                      I like scribing the TS tube. As far as pinching a scale, do that too hard with a carbide insert, and its toast. Go ahead and ask me......
                      I was thinking the same thing with breaking the carbide insert especially with a pointy threading one.


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X