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OT - How times change us

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  • OT - How times change us

    Many years ago my wife and I enjoyed the movie 'The Graduate'

    We just watched it again - disgusting! The 'hero' is a lying, cheating stalker. We couldn't understand what we saw the first time.

    FYI - I'm 70

    Mike

  • #2
    Yeah, it's funny how that happens.

    I watched "This property is condemned" yesterday ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_P...y_Is_Condemned )

    It's a 1966 movie set in during the Great Depression, adapted from the 1946 one-act play of the same name by Tennessee Williams.

    As I watched it, I was astounded by the cavalier way that the women were harassed by the men (often drunk) of the town. The men were depicted as crude and macho. The women were all weak and swooning over their men.

    When I saw this as a young man, I was amazed that people lived such exotic lives. Now I'm amazed at how crass and abusive the characters were.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #3
      Every so often I get a hankering for a good old western. then I watch a John Wayne movie, and think "Oh my god---How hokey". Same with reruns of old Bonanza shows.--And yet, 40 years ago they were so good-----Same with a lot of books. Ray Bradbury was my hero when I was in high school. The Martian Chronicles was the best collection of short sci-fi stories ever.--I have tried to read them now, and I can't imagine why I ever thought they were so good.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #4
        I watched Easy Rider when it first came out, then again about 20 years later. Same thing.

        When we were young, watching a movie was more of an experience. Now it's old hat and we're trying to get something critical out of it- and in many cases it isn't there.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
          Every so often I get a hankering for a good old western. then I watch a John Wayne movie, and think "Oh my god---How hokey". Same with reruns of old Bonanza shows.--And yet, 40 years ago they were so good-----Same with a lot of books. Ray Bradbury was my hero when I was in high school. The Martian Chronicles was the best collection of short sci-fi stories ever.--I have tried to read them now, and I can't imagine why I ever thought they were so good.
          As a life long Sci-fi fan, I was thrilled to hear that Mr Bradbury was doing a local book signing. Alas, I owned none of his books since I used the library extensively during the period whern I read all of his books.

          When I got to the book store, there was one Bradbury title left, and not one of my favorites. I was crestfallen when I made it to the head of the line and found the great man was dressed in burmuda shorts, unshaven with what looked like bed-head for a hair style.

          I was so shaken that all I could blurt was "Love your work." as he signed the book.

          I've stopped re-reading the old classics. I hate the disappointment.


          Dan
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

          Location: SF East Bay.

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          • #6
            In my twenties, I thought one of the most gripping films I had ever seen was "Wages of Fear", involving the transport of nitroglycerin on mountain roads to ultimately extinguish an oil-well fire. Twenty years later I purchased the DVD and played it for my family.

            Every last one of us fell asleep, myself included. What happened?

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wages_of_Fear

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            • #7
              I feel lucky. Just the other day I watched hot shots part Deux again and still laughed myself sick at the chicken arrow. I guess I'm still as childish as ever. :-)

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              • #8
                Going with a not-quite-as-antiquated example ( ) I recently had the chance to rewatch some old episodes of Cheers.

                I used to love Cheers when it was on TV, as a young kid. Loved the back-and-forth banter between Cliff and Norm, the insults from Carla, etc.

                But rewatching it today? I cannot stand it. I literally can't make it through a whole episode because of the absurdly stupid situations Sam and Diane got into, the pointless lying, etc.

                If the episode has mostly back-and-forth between Carla and Diane, or Cliff and Norm, or Norm and Woody, etc. No problem. If it's another lover's spat between Sam and Diane, it's unwatchable. It grates on my nerves like a chalkboard.

                Doc.
                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                • #9
                  It's not just movies and books, it's music, too. Back in the days of my youth I listened to, and bought, the "underground" music of the times. I listened to "Subterranean Circus" on WCFL among other little known AM radio shows. And I thought this was the deepest, most intellectual music ever recorded. I bought albums by "Rotary Connection", "Cat Mother and the All Night Newsboys", and others, along with "Switched on Bach", "Chopin a la Moog", etc. It was so hip and so groovy, back then.

                  I still have many of these albums and/or the CD releases. I play them from time to time and think "How trite, how empty, how silly and pointless."

                  It may have something to do with growing up, although that's something I've steadfastly (and somewhat successfully) resisted though the years.

                  Yet I even today love "Track In A" by Cat Mother & the All Night Newsboys. Perhaps there's still hope for my soul.

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                  • #10
                    Saw the Graduate for the first time last year. Similar reaction to the OP.

                    Blazing Saddles however still stands the test of time. I doubt they would be allowed to film it today though.

                    Airplane holds up well to.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DS_park View Post
                      Blazing Saddles however still stands the test of time. I doubt they would be allowed to film it today though.
                      -Horsesh*t.

                      I've heard the same phrase used a lot even today- that "they" wouldn't allow it to be made nowadays.

                      Wait, what? What, exactly, is groundbreaking, edge-pushing or pradigm-redefining in Blazing Saddles, today? The word 'ni**er'? Watch anything by Spike Lee, or featuring Samuel L. Jackson, or anything featuring a modern rapper, and you'll hear that word four dozen times just in the first reel.

                      The unthinkable concept of having a black man in a position of power?

                      If you tried to remake the same movie today, the only thing that would even be remotely controversial might be Mongo's punching of the horse- the animal rights activists would be up in arms about that, but since almost no one listens to them anymore, that would hardly be an issue.

                      Yes, it's still a great film, a classic. And yes, it was cutting edge... in 1974.

                      There are far worse things in movies and TV today. How about Dexter? A TV show about a serial killer, presented as the killer being the "good guy". Or Breaking Bad, a TV show about illegal drug dealing on an industrial scale- and the drug dealer is presented as a good guy gone wrong. The Lord of the Rings movies showed-graphically- limbs being chopped off, people being violently decapitated, and stabbed or run through with spears. I made the mistake of wathcing a movie called "Scary Movie", which was a parody of other horror movies. In one scene, a woman is blasted up to, and adhered to, the ceiling by her lovers' ejaculate.

                      What's Blazing Saddles have? A Jewish guy playing an Indian and speaking in Yiddish? Some lady singing in a bad German accent? Some old coot on a roof trying to yell the N-word? A black guy briefly smoking some weed?

                      The horror.

                      Doc.
                      Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                      • #12
                        There's a lesson to be learned here... life is just a passing fad.

                        We recently acquired a DVD set of the Peter Sellers Pink Panther series. Back when new those were non-stop laughter. Watched the first one a few months back, with visiting daughter and son in law, and none of us ever cracked a smile.

                        Now the Andy Griffith (Mayberry) reruns with Barney Fife, however, do seem timeless.
                        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                        • #13
                          Time is something that forges true classics.

                          Some movies I think hold up well (and there are many others)

                          Dr Strangelove
                          Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
                          The Right Stuff
                          Ben-Hur (1959)

                          For books I agree with the Ray Bradbury thoughts. I read his Fahrenheit 451 in high school and liked it. I've reread it and don't care for it.

                          George Orwell's 1984 on the other hand is timeless.
                          www.thecogwheel.net

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                          • #14
                            I still like all the old mystery/detective movies, like the Thin Man series, The Shadow ones, movies like that. And the Monty Python films stand the test of time. Don't make me throw the Holy Handgrenade!

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                            • #15
                              Any of you ever watch Fury on Saturday mornings when you were a kid? I did EVERY Saturday. I had mentioned to our daughter what a great show it was so she bought me a DVD set as a present recently. Although somewhat hokey I still liked watching the shows. But not obsessed like I was when a kid.

                              Brian Rupinow you should be ashamed of yourself calling any John Wayne movie hokey.......that just ain't right man!

                              The movie The Sting is still a good movie I think. With Robert Redford and Paul Newman.
                              Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                              How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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