Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sledgehammer head toolpost!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sledgehammer head toolpost!

    What more can I say?

    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/tld/5867756229.html

  • #2
    Forget the toolpost... check out the chuck.... Could he possibly have gotten it to stick out any farther? On anything thinner and more flexible looking than that?

    Is there a chuck that is thicker that he could have used instead of that one?

    Maybe it is a tailstock chuck that fits the H/S taper......that wiuld be about the seller's speed.... in any case it sticks out a country mile.
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

    Comment


    • #3
      I like the lathe bench, made from piles of firewood. And the sledgehammer handle seems to be included. Probably not a bad deal for $120, just as a conversation piece or for parts.

      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
      USA Maryland 21030

      Comment


      • #4
        Note the cross feed vise the sledge head is welded onto for acting as an X-Y setup. Rude and crude all at the same time!

        For the price the bed, headstock and tail stock are all there and seem to be in decent shape. A nice start on a clock maker's lathe restoration. If it were local to me I'd buy it for that much for what IS there.

        HEY! It would not take a very big project to make it up into a wood lathe for the time being for making file handles and the like in the metal shop. Meanwhile the hunt for a suitable metal working carriage could begin.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          A wasted opportunity. That hammer head has two sides. Should have made it pivot so it could hold a tool on each end

          Hard to be sure from the photos, but it looks like the tool will be above center height unless the "toolpost" has a slot cut into it.

          There was one on eBay a few weeks ago that used an RSJ for the bed.
          Last edited by pinstripe; 11-11-2016, 04:15 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            He sure found an elegant solution to the problem with threaded chucks unscrewing when reversing!

            Comment


            • #7
              Was going to say that using a 12lb sledge head as a tool post holder might soak up allot of chatter, till JT went and ruined that idea with the Giraffe neck style chuck hanging out in the breeze like that,,,

              Comment


              • #8
                Besides an online reputation I wonder what he's made with it?
                Len

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is the chuck sitting on a collet? And is that the unused spindle thread showing? If so you could get the chuck mounted at least 2" to the left.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Is that a glob of weld holding the chuck to the spindle?
                    Kansas City area

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by old mart View Post
                      Is the chuck sitting on a collet? And is that the unused spindle thread showing? If so you could get the chuck mounted at least 2" to the left.

                      No, I think the chuck is on a taper shank and the shank welded to the spindle.
                      Whoever did this converted a nice little lathe into a pile of scrap metal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That's my analysis of the photos. What a waste. Yes, I think it is scrap now. Sell by the pound.



                        Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
                        No, I think the chuck is on a taper shank and the shank welded to the spindle.
                        Whoever did this converted a nice little lathe into a pile of scrap metal.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just have to make a new spindle. Nothing a machinist can't do in an afternoon! Really though, it's not that difficult.

                          Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Unfortunately the lathe he messed up was a very desirable Hardinge.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The spindle looks more like JB weld to me. Kinda gray, and not shiny. That means it COULD be gotten off of there most likely. Unless the bozo buttered up the taper before slamming it in place.....

                              But being as he is a bozo, maybe he didn't clean oil off it first, and it will pop right off.

                              The hammer head looks welded-on, but that whole POS is just bolted to the bed through the slot, by the look of it, Unbolt and throw in scrap iron pile.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions.

                              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X